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Re: Two Compartment HO Scale Tank Cars: Who Made Them?

william darnaby
 

I have one of those Globe 2 compartment cars running on the railroad and it is lettered UTLX 87xx if I remember correctly.  No doubt a foobie but I still like it.  I also have a mint kit of that 2 compartment car in a Globe box lettered for GATX.  I should probably give it to a hobby shop museum.

Bill Darnaby

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Photo: Southern Automobile Boxcar 311006 (1938)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Southern Automobile Boxcar 311006 (1938)

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A715.3841794.CP/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Applying Miller Lube Packing To A PRR H-21 Hopper (1955)

william darnaby
 

I got to meet Mr. Miller some 40 years ago at the Miller-Felpax plant in Winona and he must have been about 90 at that time.  I was the project engineer at EMD responsible for the wick lubricators that applied the oil to the bronze traction motor suspension bearings.  The company got its start with what you see in the photo and they transitioned to locomotive support bearings, especially as they saw the transition to freight car roller bearings.  They had a patented and very secretive process...they would not even tell us or GE how it worked...to maximize the wicking of oil in the wicks that were made of felt.  Of course, that same roller bearing technology caught up with them for new locomotives too but I am sure there is still quite an aftermarket for old locos.

Bill Darnaby



On Monday, October 19, 2020, 12:43:40 PM CDT, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: Applying Miller Lube Packing To A PRR H-21 Hopper (1955)

A photo from the Hagley Digital Archives

https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_20735?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=36c2adf3539191ccdf0d&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=36&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=6

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

 

Hemet, CA

 


Photo: Applying Miller Lube Packing To A PRR H-21 Hopper (1955)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Applying Miller Lube Packing To A PRR H-21 Hopper (1955)

A photo from the Hagley Digital Archives

https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_20735?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=36c2adf3539191ccdf0d&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=36&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=6

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

 

Hemet, CA

 


Re: [External] Re: [RealSTMFC] Some day those on-the-shelf factory painted kits will be sought after

naptownprr
 

I remember Hoffman's character going under water with  googles, but I don't think he was under water when he got the message about getting a job in plastics.  He couldn't have heard the message under water!  

.

Could we revert to other materials for modeling? Could we go back to Silverstreak? I've still got a couple of those old models on my layout. 


Jim Hunter


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...>
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2020 12:54 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [External] Re: [RealSTMFC] Some day those on-the-shelf factory painted kits will be sought after
 
This message was sent from a non-IU address. Please exercise caution when clicking links or opening attachments from external sources.

I always interpreted the movie line to mean get a job in the plastics industry...If I remember correctly Dustin Hoffman was literally underwater when it was delivered at a party thrown by his parents to celebrate his college graduation. Of course that's where he meets Ann Bancroft's character, the infamous Mrs. Robinson and....

I have always used this comment line as bit of humor to puncture the reverence given resin kits in this and several other forums,  but Tony's comment is reality. Though insignificant in terms of the worlds volume of plastic output and less likely to pollute the oceans and beaches, there is a tinge of ethical guilt in our modeling using both materials which come from carbon based sources. Could we revert to other less problematic materials these days. We should probably not think to deeply about this or it might force us to give up physical modeling entirely and move to pure virtual models (dusting off the electronic train simulators populated by CAD images?) where we will have to satisfy our imaginary railroad worlds solely with agitated electrons. 
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Some day those on-the-shelf factory painted kits will be sought after

Ken Adams
 

I always interpreted the movie line to mean get a job in the plastics industry...If I remember correctly Dustin Hoffman was literally underwater when it was delivered at a party thrown by his parents to celebrate his college graduation. Of course that's where he meets Ann Bancroft's character, the infamous Mrs. Robinson and....

I have always used this comment line as bit of humor to puncture the reverence given resin kits in this and several other forums,  but Tony's comment is reality. Though insignificant in terms of the worlds volume of plastic output and less likely to pollute the oceans and beaches, there is a tinge of ethical guilt in our modeling using both materials which come from carbon based sources. Could we revert to other less problematic materials these days. We should probably not think to deeply about this or it might force us to give up physical modeling entirely and move to pure virtual models (dusting off the electronic train simulators populated by CAD images?) where we will have to satisfy our imaginary railroad worlds solely with agitated electrons. 
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Two Compartment HO Scale Tank Cars: Who Made Them?

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 10/18/2020 5:50 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
if you wanted him to use better material so his castings would last 70 years.

    Interesting enough is Red Ball (type material, lead) seems to have lasted 70 years and is still going :-D!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Model progress

Eric Hansmann
 

I’ve shared progress updates on a few models in my latest blog post. Details are from a couple months ago but some detail techniques may help you along. Enjoy!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2020/10/19/workbench-update-august-and-september-2020/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 


Re: Ann Arbor 73750 to 73998 door hardware?

Jack Mullen
 

On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 03:26 PM, Robert kirkham wrote:
My impression is that the door post has two castings mounted to it - the upper and lower - and so the door latch fits into them.  
Rob,
There are two distinct mechanisms, each having a casting riveted to the door post. The upper is the door starter and closer, which uses a lever (the vertical handle) to force the door tightly closed, or start it opening.
The lower is the latch. A slotted hasp retained by the long strap on the door fits over a loop or eye projecting outward from the casting on the door post. Then a vertical pin or wedge secured to the casting is dropped thru the eye, securing the hasp.
This division into two separate components is pretty common in the period. Various manufacturers' products may differ quite a bit in detail and appearance, but mostly similar in principle.
The Focus on Freight Cars books on boxcars will have some helpful photos, but not necessarily of the specific device you're looking for.
Jack Mullen


Re: Some day those on-the-shelf factory painted kits will be sought after

benjamin
 

Tony, I think he meant invest in plastic, not turn it to trash!


Re: Digital Caliper Recommendation

Matt Goodman
 

And a third on the Mitutoyo. Mentioned in passing in this thread was the battery life question. One of the reasons I chose the Mitutoyo was it’s claim that it had better power management, leading to better battery life. Coming from a series of decent dial calipers that don’t require batteries, this was an important point for me. 

I bought my Mitutoyo 6” caliper (500-196-30) in December, 2016, and am still on the same battery. I’m more impressed every day.

One other thing, and this is a bit squishy. For a short time, I had an inexpensive digital caliper that I bought for the metric conversion feature. The “feel” was sandy and crusty-like, and it lacked a thumbwheel. Both things make measuring small things more difficult.

Typing the above, I remembered I wrote about this on my lightly-used MRH blog four years ago. It still describes my feelings well (minus the unknown battery life).


Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US

On Oct 18, 2020, at 11:12 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

I second the recommendation on the Mitutoyo digital calipers. I bought one last year and have used it more than I would have expected. It was a big assist on a couple of model builds. 
 
Yes, it was pricey but good tools are worth the cost over the years.
 
 
Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN
 
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert J. Amsler, Jr.
Sent: Saturday, October 17, 2020 7:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Digital Caliper Recommendation
 
I use Mitutoyo digital calipers that you can find on Amazon.   They can be zeroed out.  They are very accurate.
 
Robert J. Amsler, Jr.
514 Dover Place
Saint Louis, Missouri 63111
(314) 606-6118  (Telephone)
(314) 754-2688  (Facsimile)
 
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mopacfirst
Sent: Saturday, October 17, 2020 4:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Digital Caliper Recommendation
 
I have a plastic analog (dial) one made by General, which had HO and O scale divisions on it.  From the looks of the letter and number style on it, I wonder if it's German.  Have had it for maybe 15 or 20 years.

It no longer has the O scale divisions on it, because I got confused every time I looked at it to try to take a measurement, so I took a black Sharpie and colored over the O scale numbers.  Crude, but.....

As an engineer, I generally don't want to see numbers that are too accurate, that are more accurate than I can reproduce or that I need.  So wherever the little pointer lands, if it says something is around 6 scale inches, for example, I'm happy with it.  If I was machining something that needed close tolerances, or I needed to stack several things whose tolerances needed to add to a specific value, that would be different, but for my modeling, in general, this is the proper degree of precision for me.

Ron Merrick 



Re: Two Compartment HO Scale Tank Cars: Who Made Them?

Tony Thompson
 

Hugh Guillaume wrote:

 I do not know who produced the Bessemer flat car but it is not Varney.  I remember building an EJ&E green Varney metal flat car when I was about fifteen years old.  

    Hugh, here is a photo of a Varney underframe on a metal flat car. Is your B&LE car like this?

Tony Thompson




Re: Some day those on-the-shelf factory painted kits will be sought after

Tony Thompson
 

Ken Adams wrote:

Lets hear it for the Plastic Kits and remember the advice to Dustin Hoffman in "The Graduate"…..

     The movie, of course, was somewhat prior to there being millions of tons of plastic trash in the ocean.

Tony Thompson




Re: Two Compartment HO Scale Tank Cars: Who Made Them?

Tony Thompson
 

Hugh Guillaume wrote:

The Globe 2-dome tank car is not easy to find.  Be careful buying one because the pot metal frame frequently falls apart . . .

     It was Zamac, NOT "pot metal," but it does fall apart if the alloy was a little contaminated. I'm sure in those days a manufacturer would have goggled at you if you wanted him to use better material so his castings would last 70 years.

Tony Thompson




Re: Some day those on-the-shelf factory painted kits will be sought after

Ken Adams
 

Lets hear it for the Plastic Kits and remember the advice to Dustin Hoffman in "The Graduate".....
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Two Compartment HO Scale Tank Cars: Who Made Them?

 

The Globe 2-dome tank car is not easy to find.  Be careful buying one because the pot metal frame frequently falls apart.  The Globe line of freight cars was state of the art at the time, as were Irv Athearn's metal freight cars.  The Mantua metal cars were good but not as good as the Globe and Athearn.  I remember buying the kits at hobby shops in Buffalo.  Many of those old kits used 410M paint.  I have one Globe 2-dome car on my model railroad along with one Athearn metal NYC Pacemaker boxcar and one metal B&LERR 50' flat car.  I do not know who produced the Bessemer flat car but it is not Varney.  I remember building an EJ&E green Varney metal flat car when I was about fifteen years old.  


Re: Ann Arbor 73750 to 73998 door hardware?

O Fenton Wells
 

Check Ted Culotta's freight car books they may have more info.
Fenton

On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 6:26 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:
Thanks Fenton - it helps.  I can figure out the various upper pieces from that.  

But that large shape at the left end of the 18” long, horizontal piece of bar stock, remains a bit of a mystery.  

My impression is that the door post has two castings mounted to it - the upper and lower - and so the door latch fits into them.  

Rob    

On Oct 18, 2020, at 2:24 PM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:

Rob, will this help AA 73918 door
Fenton

On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 4:55 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

Hi there,

I'm modelling one of these 9' IH Ann Arbor cars, and can't find sufficiently detailed photos of the door hardware: specifically the door latch mechanism bits and pieces.  Here is a link to a Jim Parker shot in the list photos section: https://realstmfc.groups.io/g/main/photo/43681/38?p=Created,,,20,2,20,0   Wondering if anyone has a higher resolution photo of one of these series of cars, or of the type of door hardware used.  

Thanks in advance for any help,

Rob Kirkham





--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...
<AA #73918 (2).jpg>



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Ann Arbor 73750 to 73998 door hardware?

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks Fenton - it helps.  I can figure out the various upper pieces from that.  

But that large shape at the left end of the 18” long, horizontal piece of bar stock, remains a bit of a mystery.  

My impression is that the door post has two castings mounted to it - the upper and lower - and so the door latch fits into them.  

Rob    

On Oct 18, 2020, at 2:24 PM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:

Rob, will this help AA 73918 door
Fenton

On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 4:55 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

Hi there,

I'm modelling one of these 9' IH Ann Arbor cars, and can't find sufficiently detailed photos of the door hardware: specifically the door latch mechanism bits and pieces.  Here is a link to a Jim Parker shot in the list photos section: https://realstmfc.groups.io/g/main/photo/43681/38?p=Created,,,20,2,20,0   Wondering if anyone has a higher resolution photo of one of these series of cars, or of the type of door hardware used.  

Thanks in advance for any help,

Rob Kirkham





--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...
<AA #73918 (2).jpg>


Some day those on-the-shelf factory painted kits will be sought after

Andy Carlson
 

Hi Folks-
We have seen a history of over production of factory painted kits which were made in quantities that the increasing movement of modelers to RTR saw kits to be over produced. These gluts lead to huge discounting; remember P2K Mather stock car kits going for only $5?

I can see that the current escalation of of retail pricing, even on reissued RTR cars from tooling made decades ago, will garner interest in finding these older bargain kits. I especially see new interest in Branchline 40' and 50' box cars, but Red Caboose and Intermountain cars should reach similar interests.

With an increasingly collective knowledgeable data base, these cheap kits offer an opportunity to do corrections that many modern RTR freight cars suffer from. Many new box cars arrive with obviously incorrect components applied from the factory. The interest in the correct components used on whole classes of box cars buoyed from those great lists made by Ed Hawkins (Who ranks up as high as Evergreen Styrene strips as to adding immensely to the importance of fine modeling). Instead of retro fitting correct components to a factory built car, the savvy modeler can incorporate them in the kit building process. The win/win aspect of this is great accurate models done at lower than market price for today's issued freight cars. An additional win is offered from the joy of kit building.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Ann Arbor 73750 to 73998 door hardware?

O Fenton Wells
 

Rob, will this help AA 73918 door
Fenton

On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 4:55 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

Hi there,

I'm modelling one of these 9' IH Ann Arbor cars, and can't find sufficiently detailed photos of the door hardware: specifically the door latch mechanism bits and pieces.  Here is a link to a Jim Parker shot in the list photos section: https://realstmfc.groups.io/g/main/photo/43681/38?p=Created,,,20,2,20,0   Wondering if anyone has a higher resolution photo of one of these series of cars, or of the type of door hardware used.  

Thanks in advance for any help,

Rob Kirkham



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

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