Date   

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Eric Hansmann
 

Elden,

 

Some customers may not have needed the cubic capacity that an H22 could deliver.

 

IIRC from a certain published source, GSD gondolas had some modifications for coke, too.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2020 9:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

Thanks for sharing that, Bill!  Very similar to PRR coke cars of that era.

 

It appears that most (if not all) coke cars of this type did have the original doors removed as here:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_13040?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=ffb3ba399698fd3b3998&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=0&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=2

 

…and that it was then a simple matter of installing the “doors” board-by-board, after which you climbed the ladder, filled the car up, took it to the customer, and bashed the boards out (in) to empty.

 

I would still like to find the correspondence as to why they didn’t use a dedicated coke hopper like attached H22.  It might have been lack of facility to center dump.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of william darnaby
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2020 10:12 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

Here is a screen shot I snagged off a Herron Rail video of an empty Monon coke car headed back to Indy on an NYC freight out of Bellefontaine, OH in 1955.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 8:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

The MONON hauled coke from the Indianapolis Gas and Coke utility to destinations all over the midwest.  In our era composite stone gons had boxcar bodies  dropped onto them.  Roofs were removed for top loading.  Door openings were boarded up for loading, boards removed as load was removed.

 

The composite boxcar bodies had boards removed and were often thought to be stock cars. 

 

As mentioned before, inadequate quenching of the coke combined with air entering the cars as they were hauled in freight trains resulted in fires.  On the Monon this usually occurred between Indianapolis and Monon on train 90 which ran in the evenings.  

 

Train crews were good at setting out coke cars that had burst into flames.  Local fire departments extinguished the flames, but typically most of the wood was lost.

 

Mont Switzer 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Is this "DowelLoc" flooring in this box car?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Thanks, Jack!

 

I have not seen the explanation on why PRR chose that flooring in doorways only, for their X53 class meant for “sensitive” coil on pallets, but it may have been from their experience with loading heavy coil through weaker doorways.  Maybe they thought this provided additional rigidity?

 

They were also DF-equipped and Insulated.

 

Must’ve been some valuable coil!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jack Mullen
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 3:37 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Is this "DowelLoc" flooring in this box car?

 

This car has wood flooring with an overlay of perforated steel floor protection plates. I don't know what brand of plates these are. 
The namesake Doweloc car flooring was 12" wide laminated hardwood planks, made from narrow strips doweled together. Doweloc was introduced in the late '50s. There were competing laminated floor planks made by gluing instead of doweling, that would probably be indistinguishable when installed.

Jack Mullen


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Thanks for providing that, Bruce!

 

I am looking for the specifics on the PRR’s coke cars, and will update when I find info.

 

I appreciate everyone’s input!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Griffin
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 2:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

Friends,

The B&O converted older boxcars into coke gons by removing the roofs and tying the sides together with steel rods (that was the method in photos I have seen). This was done over several decades and the boxcars reclassified as various subclasses of O-39.This happened from the late 20s into the early 50s with different boxcar classes including some M-8, M-13, M-15, M-24, and M-26 boxcars. Confirming Elden's scenario, I saved a post from the B&O Yahoo Group from 2006 and it tells a similar story by first hand account and added it below.
 

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
Blockedhttps://bomodeling.com/blog/

Re: Coke Car

Posted by: "Scott Trostel" blwloco@...   blwloco

Sat Jul 8, 2006 1:21 pm (PST)

I well recall the coke cars in the early 1960s, probably the M-15 series.. The few I saw came to a local foundry. It lacked a between-rails receiving pit, thus the need for a car that could be unloaded similar to a conventional box car. Those cars I saw all had steel underframes and were very much showing their age with badly faded paint, wear, some rust and dents from probably loading.. When loaded, the doors had been cross boarded on the inside with planks. The foudrymen would climb onto the top of the car with flat shovels and start shoveling into an adjacent bin. When they reached a level even with the first board, the door was slid open and the plank removed. The men shoveled directly through the door into the bin. This was repeated until all the planks were removed and the car was finally empty. The planks were returned to the car loose, and the door then closed. They might put four to six men on the car and it would be easily unloaded in a day. I recall
seeing a number of those cars, along with the wagon-top cars sitting on a scrap line outside of a steel mill in Portsmouth, Ohio, just a year or so later. The foundry went over to trucks with the end of the coke cars and is still operating today even though the railroad tracks are gone.
One thing that caught my eye about the few cars I saw in service, they had the "Linking thirteen great states with the nation" logo, which was becoming rare in western Ohio by this time. The same foundry got coal in standard twin B & O hoppers, probably a 50 ton capacity, and they dumped it right onto the track and shoveled it off. All of those cars had a standard "B & O" painted on them. Those twin hoppers, all seemed to disappear about the same time, replaced by a 70 ton triple hopper. The B & O served a stone quarry at Piqua and every day they brought from 50 to 75 empty hoppers. The newer cars were too tall to fit under the tipple, so the quarry lowered the tracks, then a bunch of them lacked what the car knocker called a "stone gussett," which apparently was a corner reenforcement to handle the weight of the more dense stone. If it lacked it, the car was rejected by the railroad agent himself, and many were.

Scott Trostel


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Good point, CJ!

 

I have seen cars with rods across the width of the car, and also those that had angles welded over the top chord to stiffen the car.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of CJ Riley via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 2:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

The C&O also had similar cars with the reinforcing rods.



Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Thanks for sharing that, Bill!  Very similar to PRR coke cars of that era.

 

It appears that most (if not all) coke cars of this type did have the original doors removed as here:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_13040?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=ffb3ba399698fd3b3998&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=0&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=2

 

…and that it was then a simple matter of installing the “doors” board-by-board, after which you climbed the ladder, filled the car up, took it to the customer, and bashed the boards out (in) to empty.

 

I would still like to find the correspondence as to why they didn’t use a dedicated coke hopper like attached H22.  It might have been lack of facility to center dump.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of william darnaby
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2020 10:12 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

Here is a screen shot I snagged off a Herron Rail video of an empty Monon coke car headed back to Indy on an NYC freight out of Bellefontaine, OH in 1955.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 8:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

The MONON hauled coke from the Indianapolis Gas and Coke utility to destinations all over the midwest.  In our era composite stone gons had boxcar bodies  dropped onto them.  Roofs were removed for top loading.  Door openings were boarded up for loading, boards removed as load was removed.

 

The composite boxcar bodies had boards removed and were often thought to be stock cars. 

 

As mentioned before, inadequate quenching of the coke combined with air entering the cars as they were hauled in freight trains resulted in fires.  On the Monon this usually occurred between Indianapolis and Monon on train 90 which ran in the evenings.  

 

Train crews were good at setting out coke cars that had burst into flames.  Local fire departments extinguished the flames, but typically most of the wood was lost.

 

Mont Switzer 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

william darnaby
 

Here is a screen shot I snagged off a Herron Rail video of an empty Monon coke car headed back to Indy on an NYC freight out of Bellefontaine, OH in 1955.

Bill Darnaby


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 8:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

The MONON hauled coke from the Indianapolis Gas and Coke utility to destinations all over the midwest.  In our era composite stone gons had boxcar bodies  dropped onto them.  Roofs were removed for top loading.  Door openings were boarded up for loading, boards removed as load was removed.

 

The composite boxcar bodies had boards removed and were often thought to be stock cars. 

 

As mentioned before, inadequate quenching of the coke combined with air entering the cars as they were hauled in freight trains resulted in fires.  On the Monon this usually occurred between Indianapolis and Monon on train 90 which ran in the evenings.  

 

Train crews were good at setting out coke cars that had burst into flames.  Local fire departments extinguished the flames, but typically most of the wood was lost.

 

Mont Switzer 

 

 

 



Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Thanks, Mont!

 

That sounds like very similar experiences from those I’ve heard of RRs around my hometown, where they generated a LOT of coke.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mont Switzer
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 8:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

The MONON hauled coke from the Indianapolis Gas and Coke utility to destinations all over the midwest.  In our era composite stone gons had boxcar bodies  dropped onto them.  Roofs were removed for top loading.  Door openings were boarded up for loading, boards removed as load was removed.

 

The composite boxcar bodies had boards removed and were often thought to be stock cars. 

 

As mentioned before, inadequate quenching of the coke combined with air entering the cars as they were hauled in freight trains resulted in fires.  On the Monon this usually occurred between Indianapolis and Monon on train 90 which ran in the evenings.  

 

Train crews were good at setting out coke cars that had burst into flames.  Local fire departments extinguished the flames, but typically most of the wood was lost.

 

Mont Switzer 

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...>

Date: 10/21/20 2:45 PM (GMT-05:00)

Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

 

Friends,

The B&O converted older boxcars into coke gons by removing the roofs and tying the sides together with steel rods (that was the method in photos I have seen). This was done over several decades and the boxcars reclassified as various subclasses of O-39.This happened from the late 20s into the early 50s with different boxcar classes including some M-8, M-13, M-15, M-24, and M-26 boxcars. Confirming Elden's scenario, I saved a post from the B&O Yahoo Group from 2006 and it tells a similar story by first hand account and added it below.
 

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
Blockedhttps://bomodeling.com/blog/

Re: Coke Car

Posted by: "Scott Trostel" blwloco@...   blwloco

Sat Jul 8, 2006 1:21 pm (PST)

I well recall the coke cars in the early 1960s, probably the M-15 series.. The few I saw came to a local foundry. It lacked a between-rails receiving pit, thus the need for a car that could be unloaded similar to a conventional box car. Those cars I saw all had steel underframes and were very much showing their age with badly faded paint, wear, some rust and dents from probably loading.. When loaded, the doors had been cross boarded on the inside with planks. The foudrymen would climb onto the top of the car with flat shovels and start shoveling into an adjacent bin. When they reached a level even with the first board, the door was slid open and the plank removed. The men shoveled directly through the door into the bin. This was repeated until all the planks were removed and the car was finally empty. The planks were returned to the car loose, and the door then closed. They might put four to six men on the car and it would be easily unloaded in a day. I recall
seeing a number of those cars, along with the wagon-top cars sitting on a scrap line outside of a steel mill in Portsmouth, Ohio, just a year or so later. The foundry went over to trucks with the end of the coke cars and is still operating today even though the railroad tracks are gone.
One thing that caught my eye about the few cars I saw in service, they had the "Linking thirteen great states with the nation" logo, which was becoming rare in western Ohio by this time. The same foundry got coal in standard twin B & O hoppers, probably a 50 ton capacity, and they dumped it right onto the track and shoveled it off. All of those cars had a standard "B & O" painted on them. Those twin hoppers, all seemed to disappear about the same time, replaced by a 70 ton triple hopper. The B & O served a stone quarry at Piqua and every day they brought from 50 to 75 empty hoppers. The newer cars were too tall to fit under the tipple, so the quarry lowered the tracks, then a bunch of them lacked what the car knocker called a "stone gussett," which apparently was a corner reenforcement to handle the weight of the more dense stone. If it lacked it, the car was rejected by the railroad agent himself, and many were.

Scott Trostel


Re: Photo: FGEX 35754 With Potato Load (1943)

Bill Parks
 

Bill - 

You are correct.  Hastings was the "epicenter" of the Florida potato industry.  Hastings was served by the FEC, but the ACL, SAL, and SOU all had seasonal salesmen assigned in Hastings to try and get as much of the business hauling the potatoes north of Jacksonville, with the ACL being the dominant player.  There is an article in the Q1 2020 edition of "Lines South" (the quarterly magazine of the ACL & SAL Historical Society) on this topic.
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Is this "DowelLoc" flooring in this box car?

James Cummings
 

Boy, that machine would be great for my leaves...lol...
James Cummings.


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

mel perry
 

what would be interesting is the unloading of these cars, with the
door on the inside, especially with no
door tracks
just thinking out loud
;-)


On Wed, Oct 21, 2020, 8:38 PM Matt Smith <flyn96@...> wrote:
That would jive with the photos I've seen and what Bruce described. These cars appeared to serve the smaller foundries once spread all across the midwest. Obviously these couldn't feed the appetite of large scale production.

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Matt Smith
 

That would jive with the photos I've seen and what Bruce described. These cars appeared to serve the smaller foundries once spread all across the midwest. Obviously these couldn't feed the appetite of large scale production.

--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Re: Photo: FGEX 35754 With Potato Load (1943)

Bill Welch
 

Speaking of potatoes, another important area for growing and harvesting potatoes is Long Island and thus the reason the Long Island RR had a contract with FGE to supply refrigerator cars, and their loading, inspection, and protection.

Bill Welch


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Mont Switzer
 

The MONON hauled coke from the Indianapolis Gas and Coke utility to destinations all over the midwest.  In our era composite stone gons had boxcar bodies  dropped onto them.  Roofs were removed for top loading.  Door openings were boarded up for loading, boards removed as load was removed.

The composite boxcar bodies had boards removed and were often thought to be stock cars. 

As mentioned before, inadequate quenching of the coke combined with air entering the cars as they were hauled in freight trains resulted in fires.  On the Monon this usually occurred between Indianapolis and Monon on train 90 which ran in the evenings.  

Train crews were good at setting out coke cars that had burst into flames.  Local fire departments extinguished the flames, but typically most of the wood was lost.

Mont Switzer 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...>
Date: 10/21/20 2:45 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Friends,

The B&O converted older boxcars into coke gons by removing the roofs and tying the sides together with steel rods (that was the method in photos I have seen). This was done over several decades and the boxcars reclassified as various subclasses of O-39.This happened from the late 20s into the early 50s with different boxcar classes including some M-8, M-13, M-15, M-24, and M-26 boxcars. Confirming Elden's scenario, I saved a post from the B&O Yahoo Group from 2006 and it tells a similar story by first hand account and added it below.
 

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
https://bomodeling.com/blog/

Re: Coke Car

Posted by: "Scott Trostel" blwloco@...   blwloco

Sat Jul 8, 2006 1:21 pm (PST)

I well recall the coke cars in the early 1960s, probably the M-15 series.. The few I saw came to a local foundry. It lacked a between-rails receiving pit, thus the need for a car that could be unloaded similar to a conventional box car. Those cars I saw all had steel underframes and were very much showing their age with badly faded paint, wear, some rust and dents from probably loading.. When loaded, the doors had been cross boarded on the inside with planks. The foudrymen would climb onto the top of the car with flat shovels and start shoveling into an adjacent bin. When they reached a level even with the first board, the door was slid open and the plank removed. The men shoveled directly through the door into the bin. This was repeated until all the planks were removed and the car was finally empty. The planks were returned to the car loose, and the door then closed. They might put four to six men on the car and it would be easily unloaded in a day. I recall
seeing a number of those cars, along with the wagon-top cars sitting on a scrap line outside of a steel mill in Portsmouth, Ohio, just a year or so later. The foundry went over to trucks with the end of the coke cars and is still operating today even though the railroad tracks are gone.
One thing that caught my eye about the few cars I saw in service, they had the "Linking thirteen great states with the nation" logo, which was becoming rare in western Ohio by this time. The same foundry got coal in standard twin B & O hoppers, probably a 50 ton capacity, and they dumped it right onto the track and shoveled it off. All of those cars had a standard "B & O" painted on them. Those twin hoppers, all seemed to disappear about the same time, replaced by a 70 ton triple hopper. The B & O served a stone quarry at Piqua and every day they brought from 50 to 75 empty hoppers. The newer cars were too tall to fit under the tipple, so the quarry lowered the tracks, then a bunch of them lacked what the car knocker called a "stone gussett," which apparently was a corner reenforcement to handle the weight of the more dense stone. If it lacked it, the car was rejected by the railroad agent himself, and many were.

Scott Trostel


Re: Photo: Rio Grande Flatcar 23018 (1956)

Chet
 

Chad

That was the first thing I noticed when I looked at the photo.  Just last night I was looking at the three I have in different
stages of construction.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Re: PE Boxcar 2417

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Dave,

Somebody else attached the photo earlier in the thread. I no long have the early messages on my computer.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 2:48 PM Dave Parker via groups.io <spottab=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Bob:

Did you attache the wrong photo to this message?  I am seeing PE 10067 (not 2417), and it's pretty clearly a 1940s pic (not 1918).  ????
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Is this "DowelLoc" flooring in this box car?

Jack Mullen
 

This car has wood flooring with an overlay of perforated steel floor protection plates. I don't know what brand of plates these are. 
The namesake Doweloc car flooring was 12" wide laminated hardwood planks, made from narrow strips doweled together. Doweloc was introduced in the late '50s. There were competing laminated floor planks made by gluing instead of doweling, that would probably be indistinguishable when installed.

Jack Mullen


Re: racks in a stock car 1940

 

How about any other kind of produce?
Andy Jackson
Santa Fe Springs CA



Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

CJ Riley <cjriley42@...>
 

The C&O also had similar cars with the reinforcing rods.




Re: PE Boxcar 2417

Dave Parker
 

Bob:

Did you attache the wrong photo to this message?  I am seeing PE 10067 (not 2417), and it's pretty clearly a 1940s pic (not 1918).  ????
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR and other coke cars

Bruce Griffin
 

Friends,

The B&O converted older boxcars into coke gons by removing the roofs and tying the sides together with steel rods (that was the method in photos I have seen). This was done over several decades and the boxcars reclassified as various subclasses of O-39.This happened from the late 20s into the early 50s with different boxcar classes including some M-8, M-13, M-15, M-24, and M-26 boxcars. Confirming Elden's scenario, I saved a post from the B&O Yahoo Group from 2006 and it tells a similar story by first hand account and added it below.
 

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
https://bomodeling.com/blog/

Re: Coke Car

Posted by: "Scott Trostel" blwloco@...   blwloco

Sat Jul 8, 2006 1:21 pm (PST)

I well recall the coke cars in the early 1960s, probably the M-15 series.. The few I saw came to a local foundry. It lacked a between-rails receiving pit, thus the need for a car that could be unloaded similar to a conventional box car. Those cars I saw all had steel underframes and were very much showing their age with badly faded paint, wear, some rust and dents from probably loading.. When loaded, the doors had been cross boarded on the inside with planks. The foudrymen would climb onto the top of the car with flat shovels and start shoveling into an adjacent bin. When they reached a level even with the first board, the door was slid open and the plank removed. The men shoveled directly through the door into the bin. This was repeated until all the planks were removed and the car was finally empty. The planks were returned to the car loose, and the door then closed. They might put four to six men on the car and it would be easily unloaded in a day. I recall
seeing a number of those cars, along with the wagon-top cars sitting on a scrap line outside of a steel mill in Portsmouth, Ohio, just a year or so later. The foundry went over to trucks with the end of the coke cars and is still operating today even though the railroad tracks are gone.
One thing that caught my eye about the few cars I saw in service, they had the "Linking thirteen great states with the nation" logo, which was becoming rare in western Ohio by this time. The same foundry got coal in standard twin B & O hoppers, probably a 50 ton capacity, and they dumped it right onto the track and shoveled it off. All of those cars had a standard "B & O" painted on them. Those twin hoppers, all seemed to disappear about the same time, replaced by a 70 ton triple hopper. The B & O served a stone quarry at Piqua and every day they brought from 50 to 75 empty hoppers. The newer cars were too tall to fit under the tipple, so the quarry lowered the tracks, then a bunch of them lacked what the car knocker called a "stone gussett," which apparently was a corner reenforcement to handle the weight of the more dense stone. If it lacked it, the car was rejected by the railroad agent himself, and many were.

Scott Trostel

10321 - 10340 of 188650