Date   

Re: GN 1948 Box Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

On 11/20/2020 12:38 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
Just what Accurail cars featured this end?



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: LV 9951 series, was: Photo: Reading Well Hole Flat Car 99009 (Undated)

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Redball used to offer a wood & metal kit of this car in HO scale. I have one. It’s a bit crude by modern standards, but with a little work makes an unusual and quite presentable model.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Nov 20, 2020, at 9:36 AM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi Ken and List Members,
 
Ken mentioned the LV 9951 series.
 
This is listed in my 12-1930 ORER as series 9951-9960, the number space allows for 10 cars, but the ORER states there is a total of only three cars in this series!
 
I have images of 9952 and 9953, so we know these two numbers are truly in use.
 
These were 1915-built cars with “no well floor”, 55ft 10in length, 220,000 lb capacity, height to "Eaves or To of Sides or Platform" was a mere 3ft 3in! I imagine the car used wheels that were smaller than 33" diameter to achieve this height for the loading platform
 
I'm attaching an image of LV 9952
 
There are two nice in-service images of LV 9952 in the book "Uintah Railway: The Gilsonite Route" delivering a narrow gauge articulated locomotive.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
Re: F37B with “no well floor” (at least that’s what I’m interpreting Elden’s comment…)
 
Note other railroads also had well cars with “no floor”.  In the Jan 1953 ORER (table in back) I am interpreting the phrase (in “load carrying platform” – “height from top of rail” column) “open pit” to mean there is no floor:
 
D&H 16160 series
LV 9951 series
NYC 499xxx series (5 separate lines)
 
I don’t know enough about these cars to know if that is truly what the ORER means…
 
Ken
 
<LV_9952.jpg>


LV 9951 series, was: Photo: Reading Well Hole Flat Car 99009 (Undated)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Ken and List Members,
 
Ken mentioned the LV 9951 series.
 
This is listed in my 12-1930 ORER as series 9951-9960, the number space allows for 10 cars, but the ORER states there is a total of only three cars in this series!
 
I have images of 9952 and 9953, so we know these two numbers are truly in use.
 
These were 1915-built cars with “no well floor”, 55ft 10in length, 220,000 lb capacity, height to "Eaves or To of Sides or Platform" was a mere 3ft 3in! I imagine the car used wheels that were smaller than 33" diameter to achieve this height for the loading platform
 
I'm attaching an image of LV 9952
 
There are two nice in-service images of LV 9952 in the book "Uintah Railway: The Gilsonite Route" delivering a narrow gauge articulated locomotive.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

Re: F37B with “no well floor” (at least that’s what I’m interpreting Elden’s comment…)

 

Note other railroads also had well cars with “no floor”.  In the Jan 1953 ORER (table in back) I am interpreting the phrase (in “load carrying platform” – “height from top of rail” column) “open pit” to mean there is no floor:

 

D&H 16160 series

LV 9951 series

NYC 499xxx series (5 separate lines)

 

I don’t know enough about these cars to know if that is truly what the ORER means…

 

Ken

 


Re: GN 1948 Box Cars

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Just what Accurail cars featured this end?



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: automobile boxcars

Guy Wilber
 

Bill,

You are most welcome, but I jumped the gun...follows is the correct date and information from an earlier post.

The ARA adopted the white stripe as an indicator for cars equipped with permanent auto racks on May 3, 1934. As originally adopted Note 13 to Figure 1 of the Manual read: Note 13-- For automobile boxcars, equipped with automobile loading racks, a 3-inch white stripe is to be painted on the right hand door, facing side of cars, extending full width of door, approximately 3 feet above the floor line and, immediately above this stripe the words, "Auto Rack" are to be stenciled in white letters 2 inches high; this marking to be applied to both sides of car. 

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada
,_


Re: automobile boxcars

Bill Parks
 

Guy - 

Thanks for the info

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Photo: WFEX Reefer 67899(1951)

 

Link to download the full resolution scan.

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p15330coll22&CISOPTR=55050&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=7000&DMHEIGHT=600081

 

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Bob Chaparro via groups.io" <chiefbobbb@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 19, 2020 at 12:28 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: WFEX Reefer 67899(1951)

 

Photo: WFEX Reefer 67899(1951)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/55050/rec/124

Click on the arrows in the upper right hand corner of the photo to enlarge it and scroll to enlarge it further.

Interestingly, this car does not have placard boards on the end or car side.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet


Re: Slide and Negative Scanners

Douglas Harding
 

I have an Epson Perfection 3170 Photo flatbed scanner with USB cable. I've had it for years. Windows 10 does not recognize it on plug and play, but I downloaded the drivers from Epson's website, installed them, and it works fine. It does a great job. I can scan four slides at once. Up to 12000dpi. This model was discontinued years and years ago. But they still show up on ebay. One caution, I did have to make one repair. The plastic support holding the pulley for the cable broke. But a hole and 2-56 took care of that pretty quick after I found a how too on YouTube. Any modeler should be able to do that in 5 minutes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Barry
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2020 9:17 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Slide and Negative Scanners

 

Charlie,

 

I have the Epson V800 and have had good success with prints, negatives, slides, documents and maps.  With the slide frame I was able to quickly scan a loaned collection of about 50 slides in a couple evenings.  The 1944 Santa Fe map of the United States is a combination of five scans stitched together.  I wrote a post about it back in July.  The Fe-U and the 1944 Railroad Map.  I also scanned the Fe-U print in that post on my V800 and straightened it with Photoshop Elements.  You can download a jpg of the map through a link in that blog post.  It also works well scanning documents for later conversion to PDF.  I usually scan to TIFF, then convert as that gives me greater flexibility for character recognition of multiple column pages.  I'm very happy with the V800 as an all around photo scanner.

 

John

 

John Barry

 

ATSF North Bay Lines 

Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

Lovettsville, VA

 

 

707-490-9696 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Thursday, November 19, 2020, 03:20:29 PM EST, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:

 

 

Charlie,

 

I use an "Epson Perfection V8000 Photo" scanner, a semi-pro machine that does a pretty good job scanning slides and negatives, as well as general copying. The software is a bit clunky, but I'm used to it now. Everything gets washed through Photoshop anyway. I paid somewhere between $400-500 for the Epson. If you've looked at photos I've shared here, you are seeing stuff done on that machine. This model has probably been succeeded by a newer version with a higher number, but the Epson machines in this range are pretty good, and good values too.

 

My scanner came with several frames, one for 35 mm negatives, one for 35 mm slides, and some others for which I have yet to find a use. When I have an odd-sized negative, I put it right on the glass. A 6" plastic ruler along the bottom edge keeps the negative square and moves it away from a void space along the edge of the glass. After I have a preview shot on my screen, I select the area of the negative I actually want, eliminating the ruler.

 

One more thing to consider. Besides Photoshop I use the powerful but inexpensive Graphic Convertor program from Lemke Software. It does some stuff that is really hard to do with Photoshop, like adding text to an image. As its name implies, it can also convert from or to a number of formats, many more than Photoshop can handle. I save everything in TIFF (which unlike JPEG is stable), except for what I convert back to JPEG for attaching to emails.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Thu, Nov 19, 2020 at 1:53 PM Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

All-

 

Does anyone have any experience with slide and negative scanners?   My all-in-one copiers can do a decent job of digitizing photo prints but, even though a couple of them have slide processing capability they are somewhat clunky to use and I have many hundreds of slides and negatives to scan.

 

An additional wrinkle is that I have about 1000 microfilm aperture cards with CB&Q locomotive, freight and passenger car drawings on them which I would also like to scan.  They are on computer keypunch-size cards 3 ¼ wide x 7 ¾ so I am hoping on getting something that can accommodate that width card or be modified to do so.  Some of the scanners look like they have carriers that be duplicated in sheet plastic to make a custom holder…if the slot is 3 ¼ wide or more.  As a last resort I could trim the width of the cards down to fit but I’d rather not.

 

I don’t want to go crazy with speed or quality and get a $5000 professional unit but I don’t want to go cheap and get the Kodak folding box gizmo or the low-end stuff that has no resolution.   I’d rather get one that can connect to my computer for post processing rather than loading to a memory card.   I already have VuScanX64 software which I have used to scan using my all-in-one.

 

If any of you have experience with scanners and can share thoughts or recommendations on brands or models to consider it would be much appreciated.

 

While the subject is technically off-topic it may be of interest to many in each group, please respond off-list unless moderators allow it to run as supporting the interests of the group.

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


Re: automobile boxcars

Guy Wilber
 

Bill wrote:

“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”

The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  

The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada



Re: automobile boxcars

Bill Parks
 

One of the comments says "The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Slide and Negative Scanners

John Barry
 

Charlie,

I have the Epson V800 and have had good success with prints, negatives, slides, documents and maps.  With the slide frame I was able to quickly scan a loaned collection of about 50 slides in a couple evenings.  The 1944 Santa Fe map of the United States is a combination of five scans stitched together.  I wrote a post about it back in July.  The Fe-U and the 1944 Railroad Map.  I also scanned the Fe-U print in that post on my V800 and straightened it with Photoshop Elements.  You can download a jpg of the map through a link in that blog post.  It also works well scanning documents for later conversion to PDF.  I usually scan to TIFF, then convert as that gives me greater flexibility for character recognition of multiple column pages.  I'm very happy with the V800 as an all around photo scanner.

John

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 






On Thursday, November 19, 2020, 03:20:29 PM EST, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


Charlie,

I use an "Epson Perfection V8000 Photo" scanner, a semi-pro machine that does a pretty good job scanning slides and negatives, as well as general copying. The software is a bit clunky, but I'm used to it now. Everything gets washed through Photoshop anyway. I paid somewhere between $400-500 for the Epson. If you've looked at photos I've shared here, you are seeing stuff done on that machine. This model has probably been succeeded by a newer version with a higher number, but the Epson machines in this range are pretty good, and good values too.

My scanner came with several frames, one for 35 mm negatives, one for 35 mm slides, and some others for which I have yet to find a use. When I have an odd-sized negative, I put it right on the glass. A 6" plastic ruler along the bottom edge keeps the negative square and moves it away from a void space along the edge of the glass. After I have a preview shot on my screen, I select the area of the negative I actually want, eliminating the ruler.

One more thing to consider. Besides Photoshop I use the powerful but inexpensive Graphic Convertor program from Lemke Software. It does some stuff that is really hard to do with Photoshop, like adding text to an image. As its name implies, it can also convert from or to a number of formats, many more than Photoshop can handle. I save everything in TIFF (which unlike JPEG is stable), except for what I convert back to JPEG for attaching to emails.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Thu, Nov 19, 2020 at 1:53 PM Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

All-

 

Does anyone have any experience with slide and negative scanners?   My all-in-one copiers can do a decent job of digitizing photo prints but, even though a couple of them have slide processing capability they are somewhat clunky to use and I have many hundreds of slides and negatives to scan.

 

An additional wrinkle is that I have about 1000 microfilm aperture cards with CB&Q locomotive, freight and passenger car drawings on them which I would also like to scan.  They are on computer keypunch-size cards 3 ¼ wide x 7 ¾ so I am hoping on getting something that can accommodate that width card or be modified to do so.  Some of the scanners look like they have carriers that be duplicated in sheet plastic to make a custom holder…if the slot is 3 ¼ wide or more.  As a last resort I could trim the width of the cards down to fit but I’d rather not.

 

I don’t want to go crazy with speed or quality and get a $5000 professional unit but I don’t want to go cheap and get the Kodak folding box gizmo or the low-end stuff that has no resolution.   I’d rather get one that can connect to my computer for post processing rather than loading to a memory card.   I already have VuScanX64 software which I have used to scan using my all-in-one.

 

If any of you have experience with scanners and can share thoughts or recommendations on brands or models to consider it would be much appreciated.

 

While the subject is technically off-topic it may be of interest to many in each group, please respond off-list unless moderators allow it to run as supporting the interests of the group.

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


automobile boxcars

mel perry
 


Re: Ann Arbor Hutchins End (was FW&D 7231 Accurail kitbash)

Robert kirkham
 

Cool!  It says something about just how splintered the industry was amongst a bunch of manufacturers constantly developing new designs and new capabilities.  I’m reminded of the conversation a few years ago about the different shapes of the ordinary dreadnought end.  

Rob

On Nov 19, 2020, at 10:59 AM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

That photo of the Hutchins end with two pressings per panel is a new one on me... learn something new every day. Hutchins must have bought a bigger press before they were forced to end production.

Dennis Storzek


Re: More boring well car stuff

Tony Thompson
 

Pete Ismail wrote:


   Thank you, Pete, glad to know where these are. It's a complete set, with not only the original Sheet 12, but the revision 12A that I mentioned.

Tony Thompson




Re: Slide and Negative Scanners

Clark Propst
 

I bought a Magnasonic unit off Amazon. It’s a little thing, doesn’t take up much space. There’s a learning curve to editing, especially color. Other than that it’s ok.

Clark Propst

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] More boring well car stuff pt 4, was: Photo: Reading Well Hole Flat Car 99009 (Undated)

akerboomk
 

Re: F37B with “no well floor” (at least that’s what I’m interpreting Elden’s comment…)

 

Note other railroads also had well cars with “no floor”.  In the Jan 1953 ORER (table in back) I am interpreting the phrase (in “load carrying platform” – “height from top of rail” column) “open pit” to mean there is no floor:

 

D&H 16160 series

LV 9951 series

NYC 499xxx series (5 separate lines)

 

I don’t know enough about these cars to know if that is truly what the ORER means…

 

Ken

 

 

 


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: Slide and Negative Scanners

Jack Burgess
 

Like others I too have a Epson scanner…a V600. It scans up to 1200 dpi so it can scan negs and has a holder for slides.

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Charlie Vlk
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2020 10:53 AM
To: CBQ@groups.io; Ry-ops-industrialSIG@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io; PassengerCarList@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Slide and Negative Scanners

 

All-

 

Does anyone have any experience with slide and negative scanners?   My all-in-one copiers can do a decent job of digitizing photo prints but, even though a couple of them have slide processing capability they are somewhat clunky to use and I have many hundreds of slides and negatives to scan.

 

An additional wrinkle is that I have about 1000 microfilm aperture cards with CB&Q locomotive, freight and passenger car drawings on them which I would also like to scan.  They are on computer keypunch-size cards 3 ¼ wide x 7 ¾ so I am hoping on getting something that can accommodate that width card or be modified to do so.  Some of the scanners look like they have carriers that be duplicated in sheet plastic to make a custom holder…if the slot is 3 ¼ wide or more.  As a last resort I could trim the width of the cards down to fit but I’d rather not.

 

I don’t want to go crazy with speed or quality and get a $5000 professional unit but I don’t want to go cheap and get the Kodak folding box gizmo or the low-end stuff that has no resolution.   I’d rather get one that can connect to my computer for post processing rather than loading to a memory card.   I already have VuScanX64 software which I have used to scan using my all-in-one.

 

If any of you have experience with scanners and can share thoughts or recommendations on brands or models to consider it would be much appreciated.

 

While the subject is technically off-topic it may be of interest to many in each group, please respond off-list unless moderators allow it to run as supporting the interests of the group.

 

Charlie Vlk

Mt. Juliet, TN


Re: More boring well car stuff

Pete Ismail
 

They’re still out there:


Pete Ismail 
Honolulu, HI


On Nov 19, 2020, at 11:51 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


If you ever find a copy of that, I would LOVE to see a copy!

   Elden, I have a copy in hand as I type. In the middle 1960s, SP issued a series of "Freight Car Specification Sheets" for all car types, 25 in all, and over time some of the sheets received supplements (many were one-page sheets, but many were longer). The heavy-duty flat cars wee on sheet 12A (one of the supplements). I can copy for you. Of course SP did not have the menagerie of specialized cars that PRR needed for its traffic.
    There was once a set of these sheets on-line, but when I went to the saved URL, they were not there. Haven't searched to see if they are out there somewhere.

Tony Thompson


_._,_._,_


Re: More boring well car stuff

Tony Thompson
 

If you ever find a copy of that, I would LOVE to see a copy!

   Elden, I have a copy in hand as I type. In the middle 1960s, SP issued a series of "Freight Car Specification Sheets" for all car types, 25 in all, and over time some of the sheets received supplements (many were one-page sheets, but many were longer). The heavy-duty flat cars wee on sheet 12A (one of the supplements). I can copy for you. Of course SP did not have the menagerie of specialized cars that PRR needed for its traffic.
    There was once a set of these sheets on-line, but when I went to the saved URL, they were not there. Haven't searched to see if they are out there somewhere.

Tony Thompson




Re: Slide and Negative Scanners

Jerry Michels
 

Charlie, Very much of interest to me.  Jerry Michels

4301 - 4320 of 183637