Date   

Photos: "New Roof" Stencil (1945-1946)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: "New Roof" Stencil (1945-1946)

Photos from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/47332/rec/35

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/47336/rec/38

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/47339/rec/40

Click on the arrows in the upper right hand corner of the photos to enlarge them and scroll to enlarge them further.

The stencils are to the left of the door near the roofline. This stencil is new to me, maybe not to others.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: automobile boxcars

Guy Wilber
 

Bob Chaparro asked,

“Was the white stripe requirement ever dropped?”

Not within the timeframe of this list.  I doubt it was ever dropped, the cars simply fell out of favor as railroads progressed with larger open rack type equipment of the late 1950s and into the 1960s. 

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

N

Not

_,_._,_


Re: automobile boxcars

william darnaby
 

My NMRA reprint of the 1/53 ORER has all of this info on page 721 just preceding a 9 page listing of all cars for all roads so equipped.  Check your ORER’s of that period.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Guy Wilber via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 11:48 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] automobile boxcars

 

Garth Groff wrote:

 

“What I didn't see mentioned in this thread (or missed) is the coding on and below the strip. Did this indicate the make and model of vehicle for which these racks were configured, or was it a pool number which would pretty much amount to the same thing? As models changed, particularly as wheelbases changed, the Evans racks had to be adjusted or modified to fit. I can't read what's on the strip, but the text below it seems to read "16F5"

 

The door marking had nothing to do with makes and models of automobiles.

 

Evans Type “F” Auto Loaders with a total of 16 chain tubes or a combination of tubes and floor brackets to accommodate five automobiles.  Typically, only in a fifty foot car.

 

Guy Wilber

Reno, Nevada


FS: Branchline ACF/URTX Wood Reefer Kits

Bill J.
 

Bought too many of the wrongs kinds of cars when I began my own, personal "Reefer Madness."  Five kits available:

Kit 1224    SOO                          Car# 50083
      1201    URTX/Milwaukee               87018
      1218    URTX/Milwaukee                87292
      1319    Wisconsin Cheese             12100
      1215     North Western Reefer       84075

$6.00 each plus shipping, etc.

Takers can contact me at jolitzwr  (at)   yahoo  dot   com

Thanks,

Bill Jolitz 


Re: automobile boxcars

Guy Wilber
 

Garth Groff wrote:

“What I didn't see mentioned in this thread (or missed) is the coding on and below the strip. Did this indicate the make and model of vehicle for which these racks were configured, or was it a pool number which would pretty much amount to the same thing? As models changed, particularly as wheelbases changed, the Evans racks had to be adjusted or modified to fit. I can't read what's on the strip, but the text below it seems to read "16F5".

The door marking had nothing to do with makes and models of automobiles.

Evans Type “F” Auto Loaders with a total of 16 chain tubes or a combination of tubes and floor brackets to accommodate five automobiles.  Typically, only in a fifty foot car.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: LV 9951 series, was: Photo: Reading Well Hole Flat Car 99009 (Undated)

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 11/20/2020 8:38 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:
soft metal overlays for the top decks, sides, and ends

     Right (memory:-[).  I got the trucks as a separate item.  My car just sits on the trucks (prototype style), no screws. 

    Found the trucks on "hoseeker.net", Lamount (Lamont).  Did a quick Google search for the trucks and found a NMRA  data sheet [https://www.nmra.org/sites/default/files/d5a.pdf] but nothing else.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: automobile boxcars

vapeurchapelon
 

When I see the bulbous end I think loading/ unloading must have been very rough... ;-)
 
Johannes
Modeling the early postwar years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Freitag, 20. November 2020 um 17:13 Uhr
Von: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] automobile boxcars

Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:
 
“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”
 
The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  
 
The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: automobile boxcars

Kenneth Montero
 

Notice the tubes sticking below the floor. Chains used with the loaders were stored there when not in used with the auto-loaders.
 
Ken Montero

On 11/20/2020 11:13 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
 
 

Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:
 
“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”
 
The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  
 
The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: automobile boxcars

Bob Chaparro
 

Was the white stripe requirement ever dropped?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: automobile boxcars

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Tim and friends,

What I didn't see mentioned in this thread (or missed) is the coding on and below the strip. Did this indicate the make and model of vehicle for which these racks were configured, or was it a pool number which would pretty much amount to the same thing? As models changed, particularly as wheelbases changed, the Evans racks had to be adjusted or modified to fit. I can't read what's on the strip, but the text below it seems to read "16F5".

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Fri, Nov 20, 2020 at 11:13 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:

“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”

The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  

The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Slide and Negative Scanners

radiodial868
 

I'll be the Epson contrarian and report I use an HP Scanjet G4050. It has the full set of apertures and you can make your own for odd sized negatives.  The more important part to me is the software. I use VueScan from Hamrick Software (https://www.hamrick.com/)
You can pick up a used G4050 very reasonably. If anyone ever needs a replacement set of apertures, let me know. I have an extra set.
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Re: Photo: WFEX Reefer 67899(1951)

mopacfirst
 

One more piece of information.  The ORERs that I checked were 1955, 59 and 65.

RG7


Re: LV 9951 series, was: Photo: Reading Well Hole Flat Car 99009 (Undated)

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Mine, built from a quite old kit (ca. 1960), has wooden blocks for the end platforms, and soft metal overlays for the top decks, sides, and ends. NO trucks came with it. I used modified 3-axle passenger trucks. I’ll try to post a photo of the model soon.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Nov 20, 2020, at 11:11 AM, Jon Miller <atsfus@...> wrote:

On 11/20/2020 6:57 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:
Redball used to offer a wood & metal kit of this car in HO scale. I have one. It’s a bit crude by modern standards, but with a little work makes an unusual and quite presentable model.

Dan Mitchell

    I have one of these.  I believe the sides are card-stock.  The wheels in the RB trucks are 28".

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Photo: WFEX Reefer 67899(1951)

mopacfirst
 

Interesting series of cars.  Has square-corner 4-4 ends, looks almost exactly like the PFE R-40-10.  (Or, the Intermountain model).  I'm sure there are people on this list who already know this, but it's good to see.

Car was shopped 7-51, but I have to assume it's of the same vintage as the PFE car, and the similar (except for sides) ART car, namely late thirties.

I see in the ORERs a series 67895-67999, with varying numbers of cars from 24 to 65 or so, (guessing) accounted for by some being under lease?

Ron Merrick


Re: automobile boxcars

Tim O'Connor
 


Here is a better view of the white stripe on an SP XMR car repainted in 1958. This car also has the 'combination' roof
for stowage of the interior automobile rack.


On 11/19/2020 11:04 PM, Guy Wilber via groups.io wrote:
Bill wrote:

“One of the comments says, The horizontal white stripe on the door indicates that the car has automobile-loading racks".  Was this "standard" across all railroads, or just for certain roads?  I ask, because not all of the cars shown have the stripe (for instance SP 64210).”

The 3” wide white stripe was the original standard marking for cars equipped with auto loading devices as adopted by the ARA in 1933.  The stripe was to be applied to the right door, though (early on) many roads decorated both doors.  

The right door on SP 64210 is obscured by the automobile, but the stripe is (more than likely) there.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: LV 9951 series, was: Photo: Reading Well Hole Flat Car 99009 (Undated)

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 11/20/2020 6:57 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:
Redball used to offer a wood & metal kit of this car in HO scale. I have one. It’s a bit crude by modern standards, but with a little work makes an unusual and quite presentable model.

Dan Mitchell

    I have one of these.  I believe the sides are card-stock.  The wheels in the RB trucks are 28".

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Slide and Negative Scanners

prr6380
 

I have had good experience with Pacific Imaging Powerslide 5000.  It scans up to 5000 dpi and 4800 bit conversion.  The best feature for scanning large numbers of slides using magazines like a slide projectors.  I load them up, start it up and leave it alone.  Scanning at high resolutions is time consuming.  I can't look forward using a scanner doing only 4 or so at a time when faced with hundred or thousands to be done.  I've done only 1500 or 2000 my self so far as I can't get excited doing more.  It is hooked up directly to a USB port on a computer.
Walt Stafa


Re: GN 1948 Box Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

On 11/20/2020 12:38 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
Just what Accurail cars featured this end?



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: LV 9951 series, was: Photo: Reading Well Hole Flat Car 99009 (Undated)

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Redball used to offer a wood & metal kit of this car in HO scale. I have one. It’s a bit crude by modern standards, but with a little work makes an unusual and quite presentable model.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Nov 20, 2020, at 9:36 AM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi Ken and List Members,
 
Ken mentioned the LV 9951 series.
 
This is listed in my 12-1930 ORER as series 9951-9960, the number space allows for 10 cars, but the ORER states there is a total of only three cars in this series!
 
I have images of 9952 and 9953, so we know these two numbers are truly in use.
 
These were 1915-built cars with “no well floor”, 55ft 10in length, 220,000 lb capacity, height to "Eaves or To of Sides or Platform" was a mere 3ft 3in! I imagine the car used wheels that were smaller than 33" diameter to achieve this height for the loading platform
 
I'm attaching an image of LV 9952
 
There are two nice in-service images of LV 9952 in the book "Uintah Railway: The Gilsonite Route" delivering a narrow gauge articulated locomotive.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
Re: F37B with “no well floor” (at least that’s what I’m interpreting Elden’s comment…)
 
Note other railroads also had well cars with “no floor”.  In the Jan 1953 ORER (table in back) I am interpreting the phrase (in “load carrying platform” – “height from top of rail” column) “open pit” to mean there is no floor:
 
D&H 16160 series
LV 9951 series
NYC 499xxx series (5 separate lines)
 
I don’t know enough about these cars to know if that is truly what the ORER means…
 
Ken
 
<LV_9952.jpg>


LV 9951 series, was: Photo: Reading Well Hole Flat Car 99009 (Undated)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Ken and List Members,
 
Ken mentioned the LV 9951 series.
 
This is listed in my 12-1930 ORER as series 9951-9960, the number space allows for 10 cars, but the ORER states there is a total of only three cars in this series!
 
I have images of 9952 and 9953, so we know these two numbers are truly in use.
 
These were 1915-built cars with “no well floor”, 55ft 10in length, 220,000 lb capacity, height to "Eaves or To of Sides or Platform" was a mere 3ft 3in! I imagine the car used wheels that were smaller than 33" diameter to achieve this height for the loading platform
 
I'm attaching an image of LV 9952
 
There are two nice in-service images of LV 9952 in the book "Uintah Railway: The Gilsonite Route" delivering a narrow gauge articulated locomotive.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

Re: F37B with “no well floor” (at least that’s what I’m interpreting Elden’s comment…)

 

Note other railroads also had well cars with “no floor”.  In the Jan 1953 ORER (table in back) I am interpreting the phrase (in “load carrying platform” – “height from top of rail” column) “open pit” to mean there is no floor:

 

D&H 16160 series

LV 9951 series

NYC 499xxx series (5 separate lines)

 

I don’t know enough about these cars to know if that is truly what the ORER means…

 

Ken

 

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