Date   

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Here’s another…..

 

But those are still calcium carbide containers in that other photo.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 5:51 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

Bill;

 

They sure did.  Here they are on the PRR at Duquesne, PA., early sixties, for transfer to USSteel’s Duquesne Works.

 

Wish I had a couple of those!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of william darnaby
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 4:37 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

The NKP had a couple of series of gons in dolomite container service out of the online plant near Maple Grove, Ohio.  Same type of containers, 7 tons each IIRC.  In one of my Cycs there is an add for these containers but I am too lazy to dig it out.  As far as I know the NKP cars all went east to the mills.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 1:13 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

This is a pretty rare shot, maybe due to unflashy nature of the subject:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_1_0166

 

But super interesting that cars on the charging floor being unloaded for use include the scrap gon and dolomite container car.  Whose are they?  Seems LSC is Laclede Steel Co.; OK, served by who?

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O cars at Wheeling Steel Portsmouth Ohio

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Thanks for that, Garth!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 4:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] C&O cars at Wheeling Steel Portsmouth Ohio

 

Elden,

 

From Shaver's book (slightly compressed)--Built for the Hocking Valley, 1924-25: Illinois Car & Mfg. Co., 82000-82999; and 1924: Pullman Car & Mfg. Co., 83000-83999. To C&O 1930. 1184 cars rebuilt with steel sheathing, 1941-42; 440 cars retained 10' door opening, but had Youngston steel doors, renumbered 12000-12168 and 13558-13828. 608 cars rebuilt with single 6' Youngston doors,  renumbered 12392-12999 and 13000-13135. Last original cars retired 1953. A few of the rebuilt steel cars lasted until the 1970s.

 

Rare photo. Good find!

 

Yours Aye,

 

Garth Groff  🦆

 

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 1:39 PM Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_0330

 

Interesting door arrangement; Door and a Half, with right hand the short one?

 

I think these guys may be carrying refractory for a re-line, not dismantling.

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Bill;

 

They sure did.  Here they are on the PRR at Duquesne, PA., early sixties, for transfer to USSteel’s Duquesne Works.

 

Wish I had a couple of those!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of william darnaby
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 4:37 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

The NKP had a couple of series of gons in dolomite container service out of the online plant near Maple Grove, Ohio.  Same type of containers, 7 tons each IIRC.  In one of my Cycs there is an add for these containers but I am too lazy to dig it out.  As far as I know the NKP cars all went east to the mills.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 1:13 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

This is a pretty rare shot, maybe due to unflashy nature of the subject:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_1_0166

 

But super interesting that cars on the charging floor being unloaded for use include the scrap gon and dolomite container car.  Whose are they?  Seems LSC is Laclede Steel Co.; OK, served by who?

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: Frisco “Sawtooth” boxcar photo - North/south, east/west longitude/latitude

maynard stowe
 

Actually, the time I rode the Welsh Highland half the trip was made cab first and half was made smokestack first. In either case the front engine was running forward and the back engine was running backward. It is a steam “push me pull you” except reversed.
Maynard Stowe


Re: Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

william darnaby
 

The NKP had a couple of series of gons in dolomite container service out of the online plant near Maple Grove, Ohio.  Same type of containers, 7 tons each IIRC.  In one of my Cycs there is an add for these containers but I am too lazy to dig it out.  As far as I know the NKP cars all went east to the mills.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 1:13 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

This is a pretty rare shot, maybe due to unflashy nature of the subject:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_1_0166

 

But super interesting that cars on the charging floor being unloaded for use include the scrap gon and dolomite container car.  Whose are they?  Seems LSC is Laclede Steel Co.; OK, served by who?

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: C&O cars at Wheeling Steel Portsmouth Ohio

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Elden,

From Shaver's book (slightly compressed)--Built for the Hocking Valley, 1924-25: Illinois Car & Mfg. Co., 82000-82999; and 1924: Pullman Car & Mfg. Co., 83000-83999. To C&O 1930. 1184 cars rebuilt with steel sheathing, 1941-42; 440 cars retained 10' door opening, but had Youngston steel doors, renumbered 12000-12168 and 13558-13828. 608 cars rebuilt with single 6' Youngston doors,  renumbered 12392-12999 and 13000-13135. Last original cars retired 1953. A few of the rebuilt steel cars lasted until the 1970s.

Rare photo. Good find!

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff  🦆

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 1:39 PM Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_0330

 

Interesting door arrangement; Door and a Half, with right hand the short one?

 

I think these guys may be carrying refractory for a re-line, not dismantling.

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: Frisco “Sawtooth” boxcar photo - North/south, east/west longitude/latitude

Paul Doggett
 

Schuyler

The Beyer-Garrets are basically a tank engine and run forwards or backwards at the same speed there’s no need to turn them at each end of the run. They are just as good going backwards or forwards. 

Paul Doggett.    England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 4 Dec 2020, at 20:54, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:



Dennis Storzek writes:

 

Few people have trouble identifying the front end of a steam locomotive,”

 

I agree, but I had my mind expanded a little last night while watching a presentation on the Welsh Highland Railway, which uses a number of Beyer-Garrat locomotives.  At one point, one of these engines is moved out onto the main line, and backs down to couple up to a passenger train  . . . with the boiler OBVIOUSLY oriented the “wrong way.”

 

On a B-G, the cab leads the boiler, somewhat in the manner of an SP Cab Forward, and likely for much the same reason.  The smoke and gasses are exhausted well behind the cab as the train moves forward.

 

Exceptions make the rule . . .

 

Schuyler

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, December 04, 2020 12:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Frisco “Sawtooth” boxcar photo - North/south, east/west longitude/latitude

 

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 01:59 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

 

  You see this usage also in car service records, such as "replaced AR sideframe" (truck).

And I'm sure that's where it came from, an unambiguous way to describe a defect in need of repair. The MCB system for freight cars is one of three the railroads used, all from different origins but for the same purpose - defect reporting.

Railroad self propelled MU cars are much like freight cars in that they are intended to be bi-directional, and don't usually have distinctive front and rear ends. There is still the need, however, to be able to define where the defect in need of repair is located on the car. Since the early electric MU cars came from the same builders that built streetcars, the system already in use was adopted, and each car had a No.1 and No.2 end, the No.1 end being defined as the end with the electrical cabinet in the cab, or if no cabinet, the end with the main circuit breaker.

Few people have trouble identifying the front end of a steam locomotive, and the right and left side naturally follow, but when diesel road switchers were introduced their bi-directional nature lead to confusion. This lead the ICC to require that locomotives have the front clearly designated with the letter F stenciled on the frame, again for the purpose of defect reporting, and this requirement eventually applied to the MU fleets also.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Frisco “Sawtooth” boxcar photo - North/south, east/west longitude/latitude

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Dennis Storzek writes:

 

Few people have trouble identifying the front end of a steam locomotive,”

 

I agree, but I had my mind expanded a little last night while watching a presentation on the Welsh Highland Railway, which uses a number of Beyer-Garrat locomotives.  At one point, one of these engines is moved out onto the main line, and backs down to couple up to a passenger train  . . . with the boiler OBVIOUSLY oriented the “wrong way.”

 

On a B-G, the cab leads the boiler, somewhat in the manner of an SP Cab Forward, and likely for much the same reason.  The smoke and gasses are exhausted well behind the cab as the train moves forward.

 

Exceptions make the rule . . .

 

Schuyler

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, December 04, 2020 12:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Frisco “Sawtooth” boxcar photo - North/south, east/west longitude/latitude

 

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 01:59 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

 

  You see this usage also in car service records, such as "replaced AR sideframe" (truck).

And I'm sure that's where it came from, an unambiguous way to describe a defect in need of repair. The MCB system for freight cars is one of three the railroads used, all from different origins but for the same purpose - defect reporting.

Railroad self propelled MU cars are much like freight cars in that they are intended to be bi-directional, and don't usually have distinctive front and rear ends. There is still the need, however, to be able to define where the defect in need of repair is located on the car. Since the early electric MU cars came from the same builders that built streetcars, the system already in use was adopted, and each car had a No.1 and No.2 end, the No.1 end being defined as the end with the electrical cabinet in the cab, or if no cabinet, the end with the main circuit breaker.

Few people have trouble identifying the front end of a steam locomotive, and the right and left side naturally follow, but when diesel road switchers were introduced their bi-directional nature lead to confusion. This lead the ICC to require that locomotives have the front clearly designated with the letter F stenciled on the frame, again for the purpose of defect reporting, and this requirement eventually applied to the MU fleets also.

Dennis Storzek


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

Jeffrey White
 

According to Charlie Duckworth's excellent book on the Missouri-Illinois Railroad in 1906 the MP bought 39 foot composite gondolas from AC&F that were rebuilt by having the wood sides removed and the addition of fishbelly underframes to haul dolomite containers from a mine at Valley Dolomite in Dolomite MO to the steel mills in the Granite City IL area. The cars were rebuilt in 1940, 41, 42 and 44.  An additional 18 cars of a similar design were built by the railroad at the DeSoto MO shops in 1947. These new cars had an increased length to 45 ft 6 inches. These cars were in captive service.

I don't remember who served Alton Steel. 

Jeff White

Alma IL

On 12/4/2020 1:46 PM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD wrote:

Sharp eyes, Eric!

 

I’d love to know how and who served that plant.  This is not the way they usually work.  That mix of cars on the floor is highly unusual.

 

Powdered dolomite was a very specific load, and would only come from certain suppliers.  I wonder who?

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 2:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

The image title is: Filling scrap charging bucket, Laclede Steel Company (Alton, Ill.). Here’s a wiki page on the successor, Alton Steel. I wonder if the B&O served the plant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alton_Steel

I see a Missouri Pacific buzzsaw logo on the gon with containers.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 1:13 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

This is a pretty rare shot, maybe due to unflashy nature of the subject:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_1_0166

 

But super interesting that cars on the charging floor being unloaded for use include the scrap gon and dolomite container car.  Whose are they?  Seems LSC is Laclede Steel Co.; OK, served by who?

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

I apologize.  Upon further examination, I think those are Calcium Carbide containers.  They were shorter in body, and had smaller capacity chambers.

 

Calcium Carbide was a critical ingredient in iron and steel-making.  It was used in desulphurization of iron, and as fuel in steelmaking to extend scrap ratio to liquid iron, or as deoxidizer at ladle in treatment facility.

 

That stills leaves me with where they came from!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 2:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

The image title is: Filling scrap charging bucket, Laclede Steel Company (Alton, Ill.). Here’s a wiki page on the successor, Alton Steel. I wonder if the B&O served the plant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alton_Steel

I see a Missouri Pacific buzzsaw logo on the gon with containers.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 1:13 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

This is a pretty rare shot, maybe due to unflashy nature of the subject:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_1_0166

 

But super interesting that cars on the charging floor being unloaded for use include the scrap gon and dolomite container car.  Whose are they?  Seems LSC is Laclede Steel Co.; OK, served by who?

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Sharp eyes, Eric!

 

I’d love to know how and who served that plant.  This is not the way they usually work.  That mix of cars on the floor is highly unusual.

 

Powdered dolomite was a very specific load, and would only come from certain suppliers.  I wonder who?

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 2:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

The image title is: Filling scrap charging bucket, Laclede Steel Company (Alton, Ill.). Here’s a wiki page on the successor, Alton Steel. I wonder if the B&O served the plant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alton_Steel

I see a Missouri Pacific buzzsaw logo on the gon with containers.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 1:13 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

This is a pretty rare shot, maybe due to unflashy nature of the subject:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_1_0166

 

But super interesting that cars on the charging floor being unloaded for use include the scrap gon and dolomite container car.  Whose are they?  Seems LSC is Laclede Steel Co.; OK, served by who?

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

Eric Hansmann
 

The image title is: Filling scrap charging bucket, Laclede Steel Company (Alton, Ill.). Here’s a wiki page on the successor, Alton Steel. I wonder if the B&O served the plant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alton_Steel

I see a Missouri Pacific buzzsaw logo on the gon with containers.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 1:13 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

 

This is a pretty rare shot, maybe due to unflashy nature of the subject:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_1_0166

 

But super interesting that cars on the charging floor being unloaded for use include the scrap gon and dolomite container car.  Whose are they?  Seems LSC is Laclede Steel Co.; OK, served by who?

 

Elden Gatwood


Resin Car Works kit reissue

Eric Hansmann
 

Resin Car Works has reissued the Illinois Central hopper kit. Details have been posted on the RCW blog.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/kit-reissue/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy


Whose gon and dolomite container cars are these?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

This is a pretty rare shot, maybe due to unflashy nature of the subject:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_1_0166

 

But super interesting that cars on the charging floor being unloaded for use include the scrap gon and dolomite container car.  Whose are they?  Seems LSC is Laclede Steel Co.; OK, served by who?

 

Elden Gatwood


C&O cars at Wheeling Steel Portsmouth Ohio

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_0330

 

Interesting door arrangement; Door and a Half, with right hand the short one?

 

I think these guys may be carrying refractory for a re-line, not dismantling.

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: Another means of adding chalk markings

Mont Switzer
 

Chalk marks,

 

Don’t forget the loader or unloader who keeps his tally (count of pieces loaded or unloaded) on the car side next to the door opening.

 

Some locations also had checkers chalk the destination initials on the car side by the door opening so the dock men would know what car to enter. 

 

I like to use a Conte crayon pencil for chalk marks, both white and yellow.  Some marks are added before weathering and fresh ones added after. 

 

In hump yards it appears the conductor chalked the track number on each car prior to pulling the pin.  I suspect conductors did the same whe flat switching to help their brakemen route them correctly.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 12:39 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Another means of adding chalk markings

 

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 04:25 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

A man who had worked for the SP once said to  me that he didn't know the marks used in yards other than his own, and didn't always know the marks used by the guys on swing shift.

I've done some research on chalk markings and this is the same information that I have found. The markings varied by yard, crew, placement and years. Sometimes the marks are intuitive but often not. They have become somewhat of a dead language.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Early PRR GS gondolas in PRR and Vandalia Line P&L

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Guys;

 

The GS, and G22 were sometimes used for hot pigs, slabs, and later, coil, that the earlier gons like GR/GRA couldn’t handle without torching the car, so those classes with steel sides and floor sometimes show up with scorched off P&L, necessitating sometimes emergency stencil work.  Scorched G22 attached.

 

The G24 (USRA), and G25 (USRA) were no good for that, either.  G26 and G27 went back to all-steel.

 

Even then there are occasionally wooden sided or floored gons that got burnt.

 

My GS offal car is one I like to think got burnt, restenciled, and is now in that most lowly of services.  You can smell it right through a photo alone!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Friday, December 4, 2020 11:21 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Early PRR GS gondolas in PRR and Vandalia Line P&L

 

I suspect the GS is hauling cinders to use as fill at this new Indianapolis freight house. It could also be fine rock to mix with cement to pour for foundations.

 

How about that fresh stencil work! We are used to seeing newer weigh and repack stencils, but someone upgraded the roadname here. I guess it was in worse shape then the car number.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of akerboomk
Sent: Thursday, December 3, 2020 10:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Early PRR GS gondolas in PRR and Vandalia Line P&L

 

Interesting the loads are (essentially) dead-flat (no mounding)

 

Ashes from a ash pit?

Something else?


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: Another means of adding chalk markings

Bob Chaparro
 

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 04:25 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
A man who had worked for the SP once said to  me that he didn't know the marks used in yards other than his own, and didn't always know the marks used by the guys on swing shift.
I've done some research on chalk markings and this is the same information that I have found. The markings varied by yard, crew, placement and years. Sometimes the marks are intuitive but often not. They have become somewhat of a dead language.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Frisco “Sawtooth” boxcar photo - North/south, east/west longitude/latitude

Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 01:59 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
 
  You see this usage also in car service records, such as "replaced AR sideframe" (truck).
And I'm sure that's where it came from, an unambiguous way to describe a defect in need of repair. The MCB system for freight cars is one of three the railroads used, all from different origins but for the same purpose - defect reporting.

Railroad self propelled MU cars are much like freight cars in that they are intended to be bi-directional, and don't usually have distinctive front and rear ends. There is still the need, however, to be able to define where the defect in need of repair is located on the car. Since the early electric MU cars came from the same builders that built streetcars, the system already in use was adopted, and each car had a No.1 and No.2 end, the No.1 end being defined as the end with the electrical cabinet in the cab, or if no cabinet, the end with the main circuit breaker.

Few people have trouble identifying the front end of a steam locomotive, and the right and left side naturally follow, but when diesel road switchers were introduced their bi-directional nature lead to confusion. This lead the ICC to require that locomotives have the front clearly designated with the letter F stenciled on the frame, again for the purpose of defect reporting, and this requirement eventually applied to the MU fleets also.

Dennis Storzek


Re: PRR GR gon asbuilt end sill

mel perry
 

looks like the other side of the creek had
been flooded recently, 
mel perry

12901 - 12920 of 192709