Date   

NYC gondola build notes Pt 1

Eric Hansmann
 

A few modelers are building the Resin Car Works NYC steel gondola kit as a group build. Jerry Hamsmith has collected notes and photos to share in the latest RCW blog post.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/nyc-50-foot-drop-bottom-gondola/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy


Re: WLE 25000 Series X29 Boxcar

Ray Carson
 

And just to add to this topic, here's the boxcar I've been working on.

This was one of the first models I bought brand new and unopened (in 2018, as weird as it sounds) at a train shop in Spring, Texas after I began getting back into the hobby and deciding on taking a much more prototypical approach to HO modeling. Much has gone into the model such as me using the AB brakes in the kit and the original plastic sill steps which later broke off and I replaced them with etched sill steps made by Yarmouth Model Works. I even added wire for the vertical brake stand and the retainer line.

 

Later on I replaced the AB brake system and used Tichy K brake. So far I haven't got much done with it considering some parts of the builder's photo and photos of the NKP 25228 had me lost.

 

Overall I'm hoping to get around to adding Carmer cut levers and some remaining details still missing before I paint the parts and get it weathered.

 

-Ray


WLE 25000 Series X29 Boxcar

Ray Carson
 

Hey everyone,

For over two years (blame a mix of jumping from project to project and plain laziness) I've been working on an X29 class boxcar kit made by Red Caboose in the WLE scheme. I've been doing research for a while and looking at photos of the prototype and there were some things that I noticed.

According to the Steam Era Freight Cars WLE X29 page (http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/wlex29main.html) and the June 1998 issue of Railmodel Journal (http://magazine.trainlife.com/rmj_1998_6/ on page 24), these were built with split K brakes. However the builders photo on the SEFC site, NKP photos in the RMJ, and the last known NKP X29 boxcar that I know of (NKP 25228 at the Mad River Museum in Bellevue, Ohio) show the retainer line on the left side of the coupler pocket just like a normal retainer line on any other boxcar. The builders photo also shows a normal K brake that isn't split like the typical PRR X29.

What I'm wondering is that was this overlooked or taken at speculation and assuming the K brake placement was the same split K like on the PRR X29s? Photographic and the surviving WLE/NKP prototype shows otherwise.

-Ray

 


Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Charles Peck
 

Boilers are boilers, be it on a locomotive or in a building.  They require cleaning 
and upkeep.  Even if that hospital could handle cold weather with two boilers, 
they would have three. One offline getting serviced or ready to go when another 
was due for service.  Factory, City Hall, school or laundry,  they can't take a day off 
every so often to wash out mud and brush the flues.  Worse, what happens when the 
brickwork collapses and you are down for days?  
Those sort of important places had to have backup.  Your state capitol building almost 
certainly has multiple air conditioning compressors.  
The railroads in steam days would have protection engines ready at change points.  
Same idea, have coverage just in case.  
Chuck Peck

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 10:58 PM Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Steve, it doesn’t take a REALLY HUGE BUILDING to require multiples of these in series.  Good engineers set them up so as the weather gets colder, they are lit and heat in sequence, to avoid wasting fuel.  A public school of the vintage we’re likely to be modeling might well require three boilers.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 9:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

My question is: would a buyer purchase 2-3 of these. I assume they would not be items that someone would order to put in stock to sell. If I wanted one for my new building, then they would ship me one on a flat car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Douglas Harding
 

I served a church that had an old one in the boiler room down in the basement. They couldn’t get it out when they replaced it with a new smaller modern boiler.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 9:58 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

Steve, it doesn’t take a REALLY HUGE BUILDING to require multiples of these in series.  Good engineers set them up so as the weather gets colder, they are lit and heat in sequence, to avoid wasting fuel.  A public school of the vintage we’re likely to be modeling might well require three boilers.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 9:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

My question is: would a buyer purchase 2-3 of these. I assume they would not be items that someone would order to put in stock to sell. If I wanted one for my new building, then they would ship me one on a flat car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Steve, it doesn’t take a REALLY HUGE BUILDING to require multiples of these in series.  Good engineers set them up so as the weather gets colder, they are lit and heat in sequence, to avoid wasting fuel.  A public school of the vintage we’re likely to be modeling might well require three boilers.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 9:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

My question is: would a buyer purchase 2-3 of these. I assume they would not be items that someone would order to put in stock to sell. If I wanted one for my new building, then they would ship me one on a flat car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


FS: CANADIAN RAIL CAR PICTORIAL VOL, 5

Jim Hayes
 


FS: CANADIAN RAIL CAR PICTORIAL VOL,6

Jim Hayes
 


FS: CANADIAN RAIL CAR PICTORIAL..

Jim Hayes
 



Re: Private-Wood sheathing differential weathering reasons

Tony Thompson
 

Steve SANDIFER wrote:

If you look at the prototype photos, wood in the real cars added to the thickness too. It takes a thick piece of wood to equal the strength of a thin piece of steel.

    Nicely tactful understatement, Steve. And even more important, wear resistance. I have read that wear was the main driver to replace slope sheets.

Tony Thompson




FS: BOOK CANADIAN RAIL CAR PICTORIAL.

Jim Hayes
 

  • VOL 2: 40' CANADIAN NATIONAL BOXCARS PART 1.
  • 40 PAGES, 8 1/2 BY 11.
  • BY RICHARD YAREMKO.
  • $8 + $4 SHIPPING, PALPAL ONLY.


Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Steve SANDIFER
 

My question is: would a buyer purchase 2-3 of these. I assume they would not be items that someone would order to put in stock to sell. If I wanted one for my new building, then they would ship me one on a flat car.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load

 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Allen Cain
 

On the multiscaledigital site there is a picture of three Birchfield boilers on a flatcar.  Two are large and one small.

I plan to model this with 2 HO and 1 N scale boilers.

Allen Cain


Re: Private-Wood sheathing differential weathering reasons

Steve SANDIFER
 

If you look at the prototype photos, wood in the real cars added to the thickness too. It takes a thick piece of wood to equal the strength of a thin piece of steel.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Andy Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 12:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Private-Wood sheathing differential weathering reasons

 

My thoughts exactly!

-Andy

 

On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 10:15:04 AM PST, jerryglow2 <jerryglow@...> wrote:

 

 

Don't those laser cut interiors add to the side's thickness? This seems it would destroy some of the illusion we're trying to achieve.



Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Jeffrey White
 

I agree with Chuck. One of my additional duties in the Army made me the facility manager for an armory building that was a WPA project in 1936.  It was heated by a boiler that looked just like that model.  During my tenure there, they replaced the heating system.  They had to cut the boiler up into pieces to get it out because they had put it in place in the basement boiler/mechanical room and built the building over it.  I got to see some construction photos, a couple hundred men and wheelbarrows pushing concrete up ramps to pour into the forms. (the building was poured concrete).  Those guys on those WPA projects really worked.

Back to the boiler, I ended up disposing of the boiler and all of the radiators, total scrap was about 13000 pounds.  I figure a ton for the radiators and the rest was boiler, so I guess somewhere between 5 and 5 and a half tons.  At some point in it's life it had been converted from coal burning to gas burning so I don't know if the conversion changed the weight.

Jeff White

Alma, IL

On 12/9/2020 5:50 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Hi Chuck,
 
When asked about the weight of these boilers, I was trying to figure out whether a flat car could handle more than one in a load.  Based on your comments, it looks like two or three power boilers would not over load a 40 ton flatcar.  Does that seem reasonable to you?
 
Thanks,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
From: Charles Peck
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load
 
Like many things in life, it depends.  It could be a heating boiler or a power boiler,
Both came in various sizes.  A heating boiler would typically carry 15 PSI or so and
be formed of lighter gauge steel.  The significant weight would be any refractory and
cast iron grates within the boiler.
The power boiler would be formed of heavier sheet steel and might weigh twice as much.
A wild ass guess from someone who has actually fired one of these things would put a
heating boiler of ordinary size at 2 to 5 tons.  A power boiler maybe 10 or 12 tons.
Anyway, as many as would fit on a 40 foot flatcar would not look like an overloaded car.
If anyone were to question it, call them heating boilers.  Still worried?  Put crates of iron
iron grates, boiler fittings, and firebrick on an adjoining flat.
Chuck Peck


Re: Ends for SP S-40-5 Stock Car by Red Caboose.

Bruce Griffin
 

Ben,

Thank you. Great idea, this would also be a good excuse to buy another Westerfield kit.  

I have some .030” wide v-groove Evergreen siding I found in my styrene supplies, that might work for the horizontal end siding. This is a link to a photo of Ted’s finished model. http://speedwitchmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/sp73562-1.jpg

Any guess on the end’s board widths (or would it be height since they are laid horizontal)?

Again, thank you for your insights. 

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
https://bomodeling.com/blog/

 


Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Tom Madden
 

The Kewanee catalog Frank sent me shows the Type "C" came in 21 different sizes, and two versions, for burning either coal or oil. The largest, which, in HO, this one seems to represent, was the Model 770. The coal fired version weighed 31,300 pounds, or less than 16 tons.

This morning the seller had 10 of the boilers left. I see he's now sold out.

Tom Madden


Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Charles Peck
 

Kewanee made many different sizes.  Look at the width of your model.  
Seven or eight foot wide, three would work in my opinion.  Nine or ten 
foot wide, I would go with two.  Some smaller sizes might sit crosswise, 
side by side the whole length of the car with just enough spacing for dunnage 
and tie downs.
Chuck Peck


On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 6:50 PM Ralph W. Brown <rbrown51@...> wrote:
Hi Chuck,
 
When asked about the weight of these boilers, I was trying to figure out whether a flat car could handle more than one in a load.  Based on your comments, it looks like two or three power boilers would not over load a 40 ton flatcar.  Does that seem reasonable to you?
 
Thanks,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
From: Charles Peck
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load
 
Like many things in life, it depends.  It could be a heating boiler or a power boiler,
Both came in various sizes.  A heating boiler would typically carry 15 PSI or so and
be formed of lighter gauge steel.  The significant weight would be any refractory and
cast iron grates within the boiler.
The power boiler would be formed of heavier sheet steel and might weigh twice as much.
A wild ass guess from someone who has actually fired one of these things would put a
heating boiler of ordinary size at 2 to 5 tons.  A power boiler maybe 10 or 12 tons.
Anyway, as many as would fit on a 40 foot flatcar would not look like an overloaded car.
If anyone were to question it, call them heating boilers.  Still worried?  Put crates of iron
iron grates, boiler fittings, and firebrick on an adjoining flat.
Chuck Peck


Re: Kewanee boiler flat car load

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Chuck,
 
When asked about the weight of these boilers, I was trying to figure out whether a flat car could handle more than one in a load.  Based on your comments, it looks like two or three power boilers would not over load a 40 ton flatcar.  Does that seem reasonable to you?
 
Thanks,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Charles Peck
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 6:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Kewanee boiler flat car load
 
Like many things in life, it depends.  It could be a heating boiler or a power boiler,
Both came in various sizes.  A heating boiler would typically carry 15 PSI or so and
be formed of lighter gauge steel.  The significant weight would be any refractory and
cast iron grates within the boiler.
The power boiler would be formed of heavier sheet steel and might weigh twice as much.
A wild ass guess from someone who has actually fired one of these things would put a
heating boiler of ordinary size at 2 to 5 tons.  A power boiler maybe 10 or 12 tons.
Anyway, as many as would fit on a 40 foot flatcar would not look like an overloaded car.
If anyone were to question it, call them heating boilers.  Still worried?  Put crates of iron
iron grates, boiler fittings, and firebrick on an adjoining flat.
Chuck Peck


Re: Photo: SP Tank Car In Tiburon, CA

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

David,

"This looks like a job for . . . [2 beat pause here] . . . Sanborn Maps!"

That building has what looks like some sort of loading chute down almost down to the road, which seems very curious.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 4:40 PM David Soderblom <drs@...> wrote:
Clearly an oil car, presumably with Bunker-C for the engine moving it.

But look up the hill at that curious building with windows at one end but only a few high windows along the longer side. Guesses?

Sent from my tricorder




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