Date   

Re: unusual models for sale on ebay

Jerry Michels
 

First wooden Ambroid kit of this model I have seen assembled! Jerry Michels


Re: Hindsight 20/20 5.0

Charlie Vlk
 

All-

Tony is correct….the Sanborn Maps often did not accurately or at all show railroad tracks as they had no direct impact on the fire information.

That being said, the earlier ones can provide some interesting information.   For example, the earliest maps for Downers Grove, Illinois show the first location of the turntable in a parcel on the south side of the tracks that later became a lumber yard.   When most suburban train terminations were transferred from Riverside to Downers Grove and a new suburban coach yard and engine house were built further west and on the north side of the tracks and a larger turntable was installed.

Without the Sanborn Maps we would not have known about the earlier location. 

The earlier the issue the better chance it has of showing reasonable track configuration.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2020 1:59 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hindsight 20/20 5.0

 

Garth Groff awrote:



Sanborn maps usually show railway tracks in detail. 

 

      Only if they are simple. The area near the SP in San Luis Obispo, California shown in the Sanborn shows nothing at all in the railroad area, with the notation "full of tracks."

       The same map group shows a double-track industry service as single track, and shows a wye as a single curved track (one wye leg). I would say that Sanborn MAY show tracks accurately, but may well not.

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


SLSF 53395

Dave Nelson
 

Large close up of loaded gondola, Chicago, late 40’s.

https://portal-ccc.s3.amazonaws.com/media/images/newberry/83/x05xj2r.jpg

Dave Nelson

 


Re: unusual models for sale on ebay

Tony Thompson
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's just one of the challenging aspects of this kit. I'd love to see a high quality helium car (pre- or WWII era) in resin and I've thought about building a set (they usually travelled in pairs)  . . .

I think the drawbar-connected pairs were made well after World War II, in fact maybe after 1960. Someone on the list probably knows for sure.

Tony Thompson




Re: Hindsight 20/20 5.0

Tony Thompson
 

Garth Groff awrote:

Sanborn maps usually show railway tracks in detail. 

      Only if they are simple. The area near the SP in San Luis Obispo, California shown in the Sanborn shows nothing at all in the railroad area, with the notation "full of tracks."
       The same map group shows a double-track industry service as single track, and shows a wye as a single curved track (one wye leg). I would say that Sanborn MAY show tracks accurately, but may well not.

Tony Thompson




Re: unusual models for sale on ebay

Jake Schaible
 

could be worse....


Re: YouTube video...

Jack Burgess
 

Thanks for the compliment!

 

Jack

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of vapeurchapelon
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2020 10:05 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] YouTube video...

 

Hello Jack,

 

again fantastic modeling! Many thanks for the link!

 

Many greetings

 

Johannes

Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953

 

Gesendet: Samstag, 26. Dezember 2020 um 19:23 Uhr
Von: "Jack Burgess" <jack@...>
An: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] YouTube video...

A new YouTube video has just been released and this one is on a Proto48 weed burner that I built some years ago. Not actually a freight car but you might find some interesting tips, etc. It is at:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcZ6fFVWZhk

 

 

Jack Burgess


Re: YouTube video...

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello Jack,
 
again fantastic modeling! Many thanks for the link!
 
Many greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Samstag, 26. Dezember 2020 um 19:23 Uhr
Von: "Jack Burgess" <jack@...>
An: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] YouTube video...

A new YouTube video has just been released and this one is on a Proto48 weed burner that I built some years ago. Not actually a freight car but you might find some interesting tips, etc. It is at:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcZ6fFVWZhk

 

 

Jack Burgess


Re: Rapido GLa Hopper

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello together,
 
I for myself welcome this new model very much as it seems to me that we will now get a nicely done 2D-F8 truck with in-gauge brake shoes for the first time! If these won't be available separately I will order several complete models just to get a couple of these trucks...
 
Many greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Samstag, 26. Dezember 2020 um 17:44 Uhr
Von: "Gavin" <senftgav@...>
An: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido GLa Hopper
Well that's unfortunate, but I might pick up a few anyway as filler, or look for the Bowser kit. Currently I'm on the hunt for TLT 8 Hatch Reefers, and I'm hoping Atlas bought the tooling

 
On Sat, Dec 26, 2020, 6:00 AM David via groups.io <jaydeet2001=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It looks to me like Rapido is aiming for the modernized PRR version
(higher rivet row for the sides of the hopper bays, and inboard top eave
angle), while the Bowser car is a post-Safety Appliances but otherwise
as-built Gla. The Rapido tooling sample still needs some work (clean up
the rivet configuration on the sides, upper taper on the side posts, add
the reinforcements on the side posts for the crossties). Unfortunately,
this means all non-PRR roadnames will not be accurate.

David Thompson




 


Re: [Realism] unusual models for sale on ebay

Steve SANDIFER
 

At least we know why the helium car is for sale.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of ed_mines via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2020 7:39 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] unusual models for sale on ebay

 

looks like someone had a pencil sharpener


Removing details

Eric Hansmann
 

I've shared techniques and tools to remove details in part two of the Lackawanna boxcar upgrade story. It's the latest post on my DesignBuildOp blog.

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


Re: Photo: Loading Treated Water Pipe (1935)

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Not very long ago, probably in the 2000s, Boston dug up some rifle-drilled wooden pipes in the downtown area.  They had been made from trees.

 

And as a side note ,one of my colleagues while I was working for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts had a souvenir from a project where the original buried piping was being replaced.  It was a small-bore (about an inch or so) water pipe that had been cast in a long clamshell form, with the concrete poured in around a greased pole, later removed from the end of the form before the concrete was completely cured

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mopacfirst
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2020 8:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Loading Treated Water Pipe (1935)

 

If anyone on this list is a member of AWWA (American Water Works Association) or can find the AWWA Journal in a library, there might be a history of water distribution.  AWWA was founded in 1881 so they were around for this.  I'm not sure there ever was an AWWA standard for wooden stave pipe, at least I can't come up with one.

I suspect it was a regional thing.  In the east, home to the NEWWA (Northeastern Water Works Association), cast iron pipe would have been favored, while the west and northwest would have leaned toward the wooden stave pipe, while the areas in between could have leaned toward one or the other on the basis of transportation costs by way of railroad flatcar.

There were probably essentially no new installations of stave pipe after World War II.

Ron Merrick, piping engineer


Re: unusual models for sale on ebay

Bruce Smith
 

Ed,

To quote the instructions "Taper tank ends, using a dime store pencil sharpener. Use care to taper all equally." Sadly the modeler took it a bit too far!

That's just one of the challenging aspects of this kit. I'd love to see a high quality helium car (pre- or WWII era) in resin and I've thought about building a set (they usually travelled in pairs) from styrene and resin (make one "perfect" tank and then cast the 28 or 30 needed).

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of ed_mines via groups.io <ed_mines@...>
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2020 7:38 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] unusual models for sale on ebay
 
looks like someone had a pencil sharpener


unusual models for sale on ebay

ed_mines
 

looks like someone had a pencil sharpener


Re: Rapido GLa Hopper--Anthracite carloads on Great Northern

 

Chuck,

You bring up a point that I am very interested in: Carbon used for filtration in water plants. I model the B&O's Georgetown Branch ca 1945-55, and include the Dalecarlia Water Treatment Plant which sat next to the Potomac River at the MD/DC line. Various chemicals were delivered there and a plan of the overhead bridge structure used to transport raw materials at the plant has a tube labeled "Carbon." I have been thinking about this for the last week or so when I discovered it and am interested in understanding how this material was produced, where it was produced and how it was transported. I imagine it came in a very fine granular form, much like you see it today in your water filters, and small enough to be pumped through the 3" pipe at the filtration plant, by air pressure. Covered hopper? Tank cars? Box cars?

I wrote a blog post about my findings, here: http://gbblog.sluggyjunx.com/2020/12/18/commodities-dalecarlia-water-treatment-plant which includes some diagrams and aerial photos. Here is a visual from 1956 showing the yard:


Photo by R. Mumford, from my collection of scans.

Thanks to anyone who may shed some light on this. 

Best,
--
Ben Sullivan
Brookeville, MD


Re: Photo: Swift & Company Shed

John Barry
 

The boxcars in the background are led by a CB&Q car in two of the cuts. And, if my eyes don't deceive me, they all have truss rod underframes.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 





On Sunday, December 27, 2020, 10:55:34 PM EST, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:


I'm at a loss as to how the 1935 could be a correct address.  This is west (geographically southwest) of the 16th Street viaduct, if that is indeed the correct viaduct.  Certainly could be, since it appears to have streetcar tracks on it, judging by the poles.  I don't have immediate access to an old Denver map, so I can't say what a more likely address would be for this, or even the cross street, but the street it's on could be 15th, below the viaduct.

Ron Merrick




Re: Photo: Swift & Company Shed

mopacfirst
 

I'm at a loss as to how the 1935 could be a correct address.  This is west (geographically southwest) of the 16th Street viaduct, if that is indeed the correct viaduct.  Certainly could be, since it appears to have streetcar tracks on it, judging by the poles.  I don't have immediate access to an old Denver map, so I can't say what a more likely address would be for this, or even the cross street, but the street it's on could be 15th, below the viaduct.

Ron Merrick




Re: Hindsight 20/20 5.0

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 05:03 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
Some cautions with the Sanborn maps are in order...
Sanborn maps usually show railway tracks in detail.
But, keep in mind the purpose for which they were drawn; to allow someone in a distant office to assess the risk of fire spreading to a particular building. Since railroad tracks were both potential firebreaks and potential sources of ignition (from sparks thrown from passing locomotives) their LOCATION is shown quite accurately. However, their CONNECTIONS were of little interest and are often quite fanciful, or lacking entirely. I've run into this issue several times. Using a Sanborn map to research the Soo Line terminal in Eau Claire, WI, I was puzzled to see the the turntable lead drawn crossing the main line into the yard and continuing to a dead end in a lumber yard. Photos of the turntable showed the actual arrangement was two turnouts, the points of which were only a few feet apart. More confusing was the four stub ended tracks of the yard were drawn with no crossover to let an engine escape. There was a run-around track on the other side of the river; so it was possible the engine just ran around arriving trains there, then pushed into the yard, but giving the penchant for Sanborn maps to omit track, I don't know. Just this weekend I was looking at a Sanborn map of a different area; it showed a track that ran across a track scale and ended a couple hundred feet further on with no connection to any other track. However, the index map did show a track that curved in from an area marked "No Exposure" and connected to the middle of this orphan track. The connection wasn't pertinent to the detailed map, so they didn't bother to show it.

Not so with streetcar lines or interurbans, even when the electrified railway was a major freight carrier such as the Sacramento Northern. This exclusion began about the time of WWI.

Indeed. I was looking at maps of Batavia, IL to establish a time-line of changes, and was surprised to see the Chicago Aurora & Elgin Batavia branch trackage was never drawn. Interestingly, the station (which was in a commercial building) was noted, and the passenger platform drawn, but no track. I get the feeling that the Sanborn Co. considered the electric railways to be less of a fire risk.

Dennis Storzek
 


Re: Photo: Swift & Company Shed

Douglas Harding
 

Schuyler I pointed out the Wool Soap signs yesterday afternoon with a comment I thought this was a building that dealt with by-products. Wool Soap was a brand name of the Swift company for one of their many soap products.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2020 8:13 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

 

I am surprised that no one has mentioned that there are “Wool Soap” stickers all over the place.  I am sure that this is a location where Wool Soap is involved.  I’d say that the closest reefer is indeed permanently spotted here. The roof walk (running board, if you prefer) has been removed, further (beyond what others have noted) suggesting it’s not going anywhere.

 

The chimney is not supporting anything, except >possibly< giving the building a bit of lateral support (not likely, the building would have been built with diagonal boards “let in” to the studs to provide lateral stability.”  The building is not under the shed.  The back side of the shed is closer to us than the end of the reefer, which, based on the shadow is nearly even with the near face of the shed.  So the chimney is closer to us than the face of the shed.

 

There are indeed burlap bags on the ground. I think they are next to the platform which has a crate or something similar on it, the corner of which is casting a shadow on the edge of the platform decking.  The platform, which is at floor height of the cars, probably extends far enough to reach the doors of the far three cars, which may be in use to transport freight.  Now, someone mentioned that Swift had a plant nearby.  Maybe these cars, unsuitable for interchange, and shuttling the materials for Wool Soap from that other location to here,. 

 

Note that looking in the dark area between the back corner of the building and the corner of the reefer, there appears to be something ALONGSIDE the other side of the shed.  I see that as very likely another freight car, or cars (box cars) on the next track over to the left.  Unfortunately, we can’t walk off to the left to see if there is a car there or not.

 

Interesting shadow of the five-crossarm pole on the side of the street behind us.  Shadows of wires on the front of the building too.  Strangely, there appears to be a shadow of another pole across the driveway at the right, but the angle of that shadow doesn’t conform to the shadow of the five-crossarm pole.  What’s up with that??

 

Finally, I agree that 1935 is the address of this building on the street, and NOT the date of the image.

 

VERY interesting photo.

 

Schuyler

 

P.S. Claus thanks for doing what so often needs to be done, repeating the URL for the photo being discussed:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll21/id/3846/rec/102

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2020 7:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

 

Forgot to mention, if you zoom in on the window, you can see a little bit of the interior of the shack, might be the edge of a roller shutter desk that is hopelessly crowded up with 'stuff' of some sort.

 

Also, note that we are looking a a four-car cut of reefers, and the three furthest from the camera have very obvious chalk marks, but the one car closest to the camera does NOT have any chalk marks. Further evidence that the car closest to us may not have moved in a very long time...

 

Claus Schlund

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2020 7:21 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

 

Hi List Members,

 

For everyone's convenience, I will put the web link back into the conversation...

 

 

The date is given at the web site as: [1935?]

 

I will say that if you zoom in on the image, the sign immediately above the door reads - you guessed it - 1935! I suggest it might be a street address number, but maybe the library researchers mistook it as being the year?

 

I will also add that the shed looks to be very recent construction, the wood is in top-notch shape, not dirty nor dog-eared nor weathered to any detectable extent.

 

Someone mentioned there may be two tracks under the shed, but I do not think that to be the case. I suspect there is an enclosed annex to the back end of the shack that extends under the shed - perhaps the shed covers this annex and/or a loading platform beyond the annex to provide shelter from the elements?

 

Also notice that the poster on the end of the car is not just pasted on, it is nicely framed with wood that has 45 degree beveled corners, and the poster appears to have been put up there is some amount of care to make for a good-looking presentation. Contrast this with the other pasted-up bills that are in the image. This makes me think the car closest to the camera is there to stay.

 

I like how the siding used to make up the sides of the shed appear to be random width boards!

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2020 6:50 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

 

This location is about a block from the Denver Union Station. A map that came with the book "Denver's Railroads" shows the L.J. Brown hide house, but where the Swift shack and shed are located in the photo is called out as "Country Club Dist[ribution] Co. Interestingly, the track (or tracks - are there two under the shed? I think so.) are not shown on that map, which shows every track that existed, and I mean every track. The map is said to be from "about 1936." 

 

Another map from the same book, from "a time when the narrow gauge South Park and Clear Creek Lines were still operating," again show no tracks but does show a building outline that is consistent with the photo. The building is labeled "KC Bag Co." I believe the South Park line was abandoned in 1937.

 

I suspect the photo is from well before 1935, and even the library questions that date. The freight cars in the background seem to support this.

 

I tend to agree that the reefer closest to the camera is permanently parked there. The condition of the paint compared to the others is one give-away in my opinion. Note also the plethora of chalk marks on the others, but none on the first car.

 

Swift had a large packing plant a few miles away from this location so I suspect suspect something was shipped from the packing plant to this location for use or transshipment in the immediate area. This is very close to downtown Denver.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Parks via groups.io <BPARKS_43@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Dec 26, 2020 3:04 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

This may end up being one of those photos that we never figure out.

Dave Parker questions the date of the photo, and the age of the cars would suggest it was more around WWI.  Additionally, from what I could determine, the girl on the poster on the end car was used on multiple posters form around 1900 through WWI (may have been used later, but I couldn't find any dated later).

The fact that the poster is on the car, and not the building, is very interesting.  As far as I know, that would make the car ineligible for interchange, which lends weight to Ken Akerboom's comment about the cars possibly being used for "permanent" storage.  If that was the case, then 1935 would be probable for the date of the photo.

I am leaning towards agreeing with Douglass Harding that this structure has to do with byproducts.  His observations about that are logical.

Finally, the brick chimney looks like it was built prior to the covering over the track.  My guess is it was for heating in the building.  It almost looks like it is used to help hold up the shed, but you can see a partial gap at its top, which says to me it is not holding any of the load.  Makes me wonder if the chimney was still in use at this time.  If it was, then some (or all) of the smoke would end up under the shed.

Probably the best way to resolve all of this is if anyone can determine anything based on the cars in the background.  Will be interesting to follow other's comments on this one.
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Photo: Swift & Company Shed

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I am surprised that no one has mentioned that there are “Wool Soap” stickers all over the place.  I am sure that this is a location where Wool Soap is involved.  I’d say that the closest reefer is indeed permanently spotted here. The roof walk (running board, if you prefer) has been removed, further (beyond what others have noted) suggesting it’s not going anywhere.

 

The chimney is not supporting anything, except >possibly< giving the building a bit of lateral support (not likely, the building would have been built with diagonal boards “let in” to the studs to provide lateral stability.”  The building is not under the shed.  The back side of the shed is closer to us than the end of the reefer, which, based on the shadow is nearly even with the near face of the shed.  So the chimney is closer to us than the face of the shed.

 

There are indeed burlap bags on the ground. I think they are next to the platform which has a crate or something similar on it, the corner of which is casting a shadow on the edge of the platform decking.  The platform, which is at floor height of the cars, probably extends far enough to reach the doors of the far three cars, which may be in use to transport freight.  Now, someone mentioned that Swift had a plant nearby.  Maybe these cars, unsuitable for interchange, and shuttling the materials for Wool Soap from that other location to here,. 

 

Note that looking in the dark area between the back corner of the building and the corner of the reefer, there appears to be something ALONGSIDE the other side of the shed.  I see that as very likely another freight car, or cars (box cars) on the next track over to the left.  Unfortunately, we can’t walk off to the left to see if there is a car there or not.

 

Interesting shadow of the five-crossarm pole on the side of the street behind us.  Shadows of wires on the front of the building too.  Strangely, there appears to be a shadow of another pole across the driveway at the right, but the angle of that shadow doesn’t conform to the shadow of the five-crossarm pole.  What’s up with that??

 

Finally, I agree that 1935 is the address of this building on the street, and NOT the date of the image.

 

VERY interesting photo.

 

Schuyler

 

P.S. Claus thanks for doing what so often needs to be done, repeating the URL for the photo being discussed:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll21/id/3846/rec/102

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2020 7:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

 

Forgot to mention, if you zoom in on the window, you can see a little bit of the interior of the shack, might be the edge of a roller shutter desk that is hopelessly crowded up with 'stuff' of some sort.

 

Also, note that we are looking a a four-car cut of reefers, and the three furthest from the camera have very obvious chalk marks, but the one car closest to the camera does NOT have any chalk marks. Further evidence that the car closest to us may not have moved in a very long time...

 

Claus Schlund

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2020 7:21 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

 

Hi List Members,

 

For everyone's convenience, I will put the web link back into the conversation...

 

 

The date is given at the web site as: [1935?]

 

I will say that if you zoom in on the image, the sign immediately above the door reads - you guessed it - 1935! I suggest it might be a street address number, but maybe the library researchers mistook it as being the year?

 

I will also add that the shed looks to be very recent construction, the wood is in top-notch shape, not dirty nor dog-eared nor weathered to any detectable extent.

 

Someone mentioned there may be two tracks under the shed, but I do not think that to be the case. I suspect there is an enclosed annex to the back end of the shack that extends under the shed - perhaps the shed covers this annex and/or a loading platform beyond the annex to provide shelter from the elements?

 

Also notice that the poster on the end of the car is not just pasted on, it is nicely framed with wood that has 45 degree beveled corners, and the poster appears to have been put up there is some amount of care to make for a good-looking presentation. Contrast this with the other pasted-up bills that are in the image. This makes me think the car closest to the camera is there to stay.

 

I like how the siding used to make up the sides of the shed appear to be random width boards!

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, December 26, 2020 6:50 PM

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

 

This location is about a block from the Denver Union Station. A map that came with the book "Denver's Railroads" shows the L.J. Brown hide house, but where the Swift shack and shed are located in the photo is called out as "Country Club Dist[ribution] Co. Interestingly, the track (or tracks - are there two under the shed? I think so.) are not shown on that map, which shows every track that existed, and I mean every track. The map is said to be from "about 1936." 

 

Another map from the same book, from "a time when the narrow gauge South Park and Clear Creek Lines were still operating," again show no tracks but does show a building outline that is consistent with the photo. The building is labeled "KC Bag Co." I believe the South Park line was abandoned in 1937.

 

I suspect the photo is from well before 1935, and even the library questions that date. The freight cars in the background seem to support this.

 

I tend to agree that the reefer closest to the camera is permanently parked there. The condition of the paint compared to the others is one give-away in my opinion. Note also the plethora of chalk marks on the others, but none on the first car.

 

Swift had a large packing plant a few miles away from this location so I suspect suspect something was shipped from the packing plant to this location for use or transshipment in the immediate area. This is very close to downtown Denver.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Parks via groups.io <BPARKS_43@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Dec 26, 2020 3:04 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Swift & Company Shed

This may end up being one of those photos that we never figure out.

Dave Parker questions the date of the photo, and the age of the cars would suggest it was more around WWI.  Additionally, from what I could determine, the girl on the poster on the end car was used on multiple posters form around 1900 through WWI (may have been used later, but I couldn't find any dated later).

The fact that the poster is on the car, and not the building, is very interesting.  As far as I know, that would make the car ineligible for interchange, which lends weight to Ken Akerboom's comment about the cars possibly being used for "permanent" storage.  If that was the case, then 1935 would be probable for the date of the photo.

I am leaning towards agreeing with Douglass Harding that this structure has to do with byproducts.  His observations about that are logical.

Finally, the brick chimney looks like it was built prior to the covering over the track.  My guess is it was for heating in the building.  It almost looks like it is used to help hold up the shed, but you can see a partial gap at its top, which says to me it is not holding any of the load.  Makes me wonder if the chimney was still in use at this time.  If it was, then some (or all) of the smoke would end up under the shed.

Probably the best way to resolve all of this is if anyone can determine anything based on the cars in the background.  Will be interesting to follow other's comments on this one.
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida

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