Date   

Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 07:21 PM, irv_thomae wrote:
Rapid changes were not exactly common in prewar railroad engineering practice.  Does anyone happen to know why this transition, from square corner posts to the 'W' type, happened to quickly? 

The ends were a proprietary product (also patented) so when the Standard Railway Equipment Co. changed the way the ends were to attach, everybody else, railroad and carbuilder alike, had to modify their designs. Any blurring of the actual date of change likely traces back to when exactly the contracts were signed, when the ends were ordered, etc. This is really a good example of the railroad engineering departments losing ultimate control of the design process to the vendors, a trend that would only accelerate. This same thing is very evident after the war, when SRECo. changed the designs of both the pressing pattern in the ends and also the roof. The parts were functionally interchangeable, so the change happened literally overnight.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Two boxcars

Bill J.
 

"Guess" they're "ok" if you like superb craftsmanship and excellent colouring and weathering.

Especially the weathering with chalking paint and subtle streaks.

reallyREALLY nice work, Rich!

Bill Jolitz


Re: Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Todd Sullivan
 

George,

I don't have a set of the clasp trucks, but I do have a set of trucks for the 40' UCR gondola from the same 3D printer.  The trucks are equipped with Tangent wheel sets, and they roll reasonably well, not like a Delrin truck, but well enough.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Corey,

There are a couple of thins that will come before a photo  of my UCR gon in log service:

1) Completion of our new house, scheduled for March 8 currently, but subject to possible delays (as witha any major construction project).
2) Moving 2/3 of our household goods and 85% of my model RRing equipment and material dwon to Texas from Syracuse, NY.
3) Building a new layout.

All are possible and currently on track. 

I guess I could create a photo diorama and tackle your request that way.  That's actually a good idea, as I have nowhere to take realistic photos of my models.  I might get that done in a month or so.

Todd.

On Wednesday, December 30, 2020, 9:03:47 PM CST, Corey Bonsall <coreybonsall@...> wrote:


Mr. Sullivan,

I'm glad you enjoy your cars!  I think I saw one of those photos come across here of the UCR cars in log service, and it was very intriguing.  These cars and kits are definitely a labor of love, it would be great to see a photo of your GS gon in such service.

Corey


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Robert kirkham
 

Hi Irv,

I think the key thing to keep in mind is that the ends were proprietary to a parts manufacturer, not to any one railroad.  So like you car, it has the look of the year it was bought.  It's more complex than that, but you can probably find several references if you search the archives using the word dreadnought.  I have forgotten what I’ve read on the topic.  For a given date, I think it probably matters which plant was manufacturing one end or another.  For the CNR, I imagine a certain percentage of their purchases were from Canadian licensed manufacturers, and those folks may have been constrained to stay with older tooling for longer as the war was already underway up here. 

But my comments are only inference and reflecting what I have read over the years, not detailed observation or analysis.


Rob

On Dec 30, 2020, at 7:21 PM, irv_thomae <irvthomae@...> wrote:

I've been carefully studying the Ed Hawkins/Ted Culotta tabulation covering almost 93,000 AAR boxcars built between 1936 and 1947.  Having chosen long ago to model the time period from fall 1940 through summer 1941, and wanting only a few newly built cars on my back-country layout, I highlighted each group of cars built before 1940 in green, and each group built in 1940 in yellow.
  Doing that led to an interesting discovery about cars built with the standard 4-5 Dreadnaught ends:  The vast majority of those built before 1940 had square-cornered ends.  As of January of 1940, there was a dramatic transition to round-cornered ends, also known as "W corner-post."   Apart for the CN, which stayed with square corner posts through March of 1940, it appears that fewer than a dozen more cars were built with square corners from 1-40 onward, for even the smallest railroads.
  Rapid changes were not exactly common in prewar railroad engineering practice.  Does anyone happen to know why this transition, from square corner posts to the 'W' type, happened to quickly?   Was it driven by regulatory action, perhaps in response to safety issues?  Or were there dramatic savings either in weight or fabrication cost?
   And, did otherwise very similar cars with the two different corner post types show a consistent weight difference?
Thanks!
Irv


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

mel perry
 

get a cat
;-)
mel perry

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020, 8:17 AM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:

Good suggestion.  I do this for my historic vehicles.  For the basement I called ORKIN.  Took care of rodents and insects.

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Happel via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

 

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Mont Switzer
 

Good suggestion.  I do this for my historic vehicles.  For the basement I called ORKIN.  Took care of rodents and insects.

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Happel via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

 

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Mont Switzer
 

Todd and all,

 

Hmmm.  Maybe that is why I have a few mystery dead spots even after the track cleaner has done its thing.  I hate to think of it, but maybe a closer inspection is in order.

 

Mont    

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Joseph
 

Spider poop on models is also a problem for my stuff in display cases.  I am fed up with the 8 legged menace!

A fellow from Bird Island MN used fennel seeds to represent sugar beets.  Dowsed  in flat finish on a strip of plastic or wood painted appropriately 

Joe Binish
New Hope, MN

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 10:04 AM Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Charles Happel
 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown


On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:


Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Todd Sullivan
 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: FRISCO USRA GONDOLA

Rich C
 

Great looking model, Bill. I too will go back and improve yesterdays models with what I learned today.

Rich Christie

On Wednesday, December 30, 2020, 08:02:10 PM CST, WILLIAM PARDIE <pardiew001@...> wrote:



The recent discussions of Frisco USRA gondolas plus my own efforts in gathering information don the Sunshine rebuilt frisco gondola prompted me to bring out and photograph one of the first series of Frisco gondolas.  This is a Precision Scale car that I did over thirty years ago.   Looking at it now I see that some lettering was missing such as the reweigh date and GB designation.  At least the car number is in the correct series.  I did not think that I had added any detail but I see that I had improved the brake rigging and maintained the split K brake arrangement.  I also added air hose brackets and a crude Carmer cut lever. The wood interior and exposed floor board ends deserve better treatment.

The car was finished from an article by Richard Hendrickson in which lettered the oppoisite side for a different railroad.  I find it rewarding to go back periodically and improve on work long finished.

Hope you enjoy:
\
Bill Pardie


Re: Two boxcars

George Corral
 

Very nicely done. I appreciate you listing the parts you used especially the paint and weathering.  Details look great. 
Thanks for sharing.

George Corral
Just North of The Clearwater Car Shops


Re: Photo: Lumber Transfer Between Standard Gauge & Narrow Gauge Cars (1949)

William Reed
 

Neat operation, I have a video showing this operation in action with that wooden transfer crane. It was replaced by a steel self-propelled transfer crane at some point. 

William
aka drgwk37


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of David Soderblom <david.soderblom@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 8:56 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Lumber Transfer Between Standard Gauge & Narrow Gauge Cars (1949)
 
The gantry is itself quite an antique, being wooden.  Note the outside brake beams on the narrow gauge car.




David Soderblom
Baltimore MD




--
David Soderblom
Baltimore MD
david.soderblom@...


Re: Photo: Lumber Transfer Between Standard Gauge & Narrow Gauge Cars (1949)

David Soderblom
 

The gantry is itself quite an antique, being wooden.  Note the outside brake beams on the narrow gauge car.




David Soderblom
Baltimore MD




--
David Soderblom
Baltimore MD
david.soderblom@...


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Mont Switzer
 

I made ear corn loads and corn crib filler out of out of bird seed, painted yellow and glued to Styrofoam fillers.  We took a 2 week trip to FL and Cocoa Beach in January during which time a mouse family apparently house sat for us.  Upon our return we found that the mouse family had feasted on those bird seed loads, paint, glue and all.  A stock car converted to a corn crib had a hole chewed in it.  They ate an entire grain truck load and maybe the styrene sides.  I have yet to find those scratch built sides for the truck.  Fortunately the pot metal truck escaped any damage.  Pot metal must not have met the mouse family’s dietary needs.

 

Guess what I was picking up from the right of way and other locations that accommodate my (mandatory STMFC content) steam era freight cars  with tweezers?  Great way to foul a switch.

 

So, you might want to look for something a little less enticing.

 

Mont    

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Hutchison
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 8:17 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

There has been fairly recent discussion of sugar beets.  I would think the plants offer great opportunities for modeling of cars, unloading tracks, and other facilities.
I am wondering if anyone has attempted to model sugar beets as car loads? The closest I can think of might be Rice Krispies sealed and painted (now that we have finally gotten rid of our mouse problems) but I think even that would be out of scale?
rh


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Ray Hutchison
 

There has been fairly recent discussion of sugar beets.  I would think the plants offer great opportunities for modeling of cars, unloading tracks, and other facilities.
I am wondering if anyone has attempted to model sugar beets as car loads? The closest I can think of might be Rice Krispies sealed and painted (now that we have finally gotten rid of our mouse problems) but I think even that would be out of scale?
rh


Re: Lackawanna & Southern poultry cars

Ken O'Brien
 

Brad,
Delving deeper into the Taber volume cited by Drew, the caption for the poultry car class L-1 says 50 cars were built in 1898 and 1899 in the Scranton car shops. These were scrapped in 1921.
Sides and ends were open slatted with no provision for a drover. A drovers car was used.

Ken O'Brien


Re: Two boxcars

gtws00
 

That is a fine looking pair of cars Rich. Lots of nice additions and modifications,
Thanks for sharing your work.
George Toman
Willow Springs, Illinois


Re: Lackawanna & Southern poultry cars

earlyrail
 

I'll get the list started

June 1905 ORER
DL&W  series 4560 - 4699  36'  50 cars
Sou   series 44900 - 44919    36'  18 cars

Oct 1919 ORER
DL&W 4650 - 4699  27 cars
SOU   44875 - 44899 25 cars
          44900 - 44942  10 cars

Howard Garner

8221 - 8240 of 188732