Date   

Re: Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

al_brown03
 

There's a photo of CGW 91014 in RP CYC 35, p 224, and it too has seven-panel doors.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/77031/rec/262


       I note the CGW box car has panel doors. Was this also true of the preceding (1944) cars, CGW 91000-91099?

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Loading Peanuts (Undated)

Patrick Wade
 

Interesting to note the wires on the insulators under the platform cover. Have never seen this before.

Pat Wade
Sant Barbara, CA

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 1:37 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Loading Peanuts (Undated)

A photo from the Norfolk Southern Corporation:

https://tinyurl.com/y8vbxxbr

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/16921/rec/6

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Wreck in Colorado.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/77031/rec/262

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Loading Peanuts (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Loading Peanuts (Undated)

A photo from the Norfolk Southern Corporation:

https://tinyurl.com/y8vbxxbr

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Tony Thompson
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

The ends were a proprietary product (also patented) so when the Standard Railway Equipment Co. changed the way the ends were to attach, everybody else, railroad and carbuilder alike, had to modify their designs. Any blurring of the actual date of change likely traces back to when exactly the contracts were signed, when the ends were ordered, etc. This is really a good example of the railroad engineering departments losing ultimate control of the design process to the vendors, a trend that would only accelerate. This same thing is very evident after the war, when SRECo. changed the designs of both the pressing pattern in the ends and also the roof. The parts were functionally interchangeable, so the change happened literally overnight.

     Perfectly stated answer to an unobvious question. Thanks, Dennis.

Tony Thompson




Re: Two boxcars

Tony Thompson
 

     Both cars are beautiful results, Rich. Nice use of upgraded details to improve the look, and nice light weathering. I'm impressed.

Tony Thompson




Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Bob Chaparro
 

Some modelers have used anise seeds for sugar beets. Anise seeds are used as a spice.

Photo:

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0053/1247/9325/products/aniseseeds.jpg?v=1587829018

I have no idea if mice prefer these seeds.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Two boxcars

Matt Goodman
 

Nice job on the wheel color - black with a bit of sheen to suggest oil. Rail color looks good as well.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio, US

On Dec 30, 2020, at 5:38 PM, Richard Remiarz <rremiarz@...> wrote:

Greetings,
 
I have been trying to clear off my workbench by finishing various freight car projects by the end of the year.  I just finished two boxcars.
 
CNW 107734 is a riveted side PS-1 boxcar.  It was built from an Intermountain 10’ 6” boxcar kit.  Intermountain 4044-02 Youngstown doors, 40' PS-1 roof w/ end panels removed, 50' PS-1 ends, and 40' PS-1 detail sprue were used.  I added a Red Caboose AAR underframe, Kato ASF A3 trucks with ReBoxx 20950 wheelsets, Kadee 158 couplers, 2002 roofwalk, 2252 side grab irons,and 2024 Equipco brake wheel; DA BW6401 Equipco housing and FC6213 door handles; Tichy brake levers, HiTech Details 6040 air hoses and brackets, Archer AR88025 rivets, Speedwitch D197 decals, and Speedwitch chalk mark decals.  I painted the car with Tru-Color TCP-010 Black and TCP-183 C&NW 1944-60's Freight Car Brown after priming with Tamiya Fine Surface primer.  Weathering was done with Pan Pastel Paynes Grey Extra Dark and Polly Scale Rust and Grimy Black.
 
SP 82765 is a class B-50-21 1937 AAR boxcar.  It started as an IMWX kit.  The underframe was detailed with a Westerfield AB brake valve, Cal Scale dust collector, and Yarmouth brake levers.  Other details include Kadee 2251 side grabs, 2016 gypsum running board, 158 couplers, 441 brake pads, & 2021 Equico brake wheel.  From Yarmouth I used 507 cut lever brackets and 201 stirrup steps.  I used Accurail Bettendorf trucks with IM 0.088" wheelsets.  Other details included DA BW6401 Equipco brake housing and SY2210 chain, Plano 132 Gypsum brake platform, HiTech Details 6040 air hoses and brackets, Tangent TSM203 coupler lift bars, and Tichy 3021 grab irons.  The original plan was to use the factory lettering, but I wanted to model a car repainted with the Southern Pacific spelled out.  I removed the lettering on the left side of the cars and repainted with ScaleCoat Boxcar Red and used Speedwitch and Sunshine Models decals.  Weathering was done with Pan Pastel Neutral Grey Extra Dark and Polly Scale Rust and Grimy Black.  I used Speedwitch chalk mark decals.  Special thanks to Tony Thompson for answering questions so I could get the details right.
 
By tomorrow I should have the last freight car on the workbench done so I can start a new set of projects.
 
Sincerely,
Rich Remiarz
Vadnais Heights, MN
 
 
 
 
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
<CNW 107734-1.jpg><SP 82765-1.jpg>


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 07:21 PM, irv_thomae wrote:
Rapid changes were not exactly common in prewar railroad engineering practice.  Does anyone happen to know why this transition, from square corner posts to the 'W' type, happened to quickly? 

The ends were a proprietary product (also patented) so when the Standard Railway Equipment Co. changed the way the ends were to attach, everybody else, railroad and carbuilder alike, had to modify their designs. Any blurring of the actual date of change likely traces back to when exactly the contracts were signed, when the ends were ordered, etc. This is really a good example of the railroad engineering departments losing ultimate control of the design process to the vendors, a trend that would only accelerate. This same thing is very evident after the war, when SRECo. changed the designs of both the pressing pattern in the ends and also the roof. The parts were functionally interchangeable, so the change happened literally overnight.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Two boxcars

Bill J.
 

"Guess" they're "ok" if you like superb craftsmanship and excellent colouring and weathering.

Especially the weathering with chalking paint and subtle streaks.

reallyREALLY nice work, Rich!

Bill Jolitz


Re: Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Todd Sullivan
 

George,

I don't have a set of the clasp trucks, but I do have a set of trucks for the 40' UCR gondola from the same 3D printer.  The trucks are equipped with Tangent wheel sets, and they roll reasonably well, not like a Delrin truck, but well enough.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Corey,

There are a couple of thins that will come before a photo  of my UCR gon in log service:

1) Completion of our new house, scheduled for March 8 currently, but subject to possible delays (as witha any major construction project).
2) Moving 2/3 of our household goods and 85% of my model RRing equipment and material dwon to Texas from Syracuse, NY.
3) Building a new layout.

All are possible and currently on track. 

I guess I could create a photo diorama and tackle your request that way.  That's actually a good idea, as I have nowhere to take realistic photos of my models.  I might get that done in a month or so.

Todd.

On Wednesday, December 30, 2020, 9:03:47 PM CST, Corey Bonsall <coreybonsall@...> wrote:


Mr. Sullivan,

I'm glad you enjoy your cars!  I think I saw one of those photos come across here of the UCR cars in log service, and it was very intriguing.  These cars and kits are definitely a labor of love, it would be great to see a photo of your GS gon in such service.

Corey


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Robert kirkham
 

Hi Irv,

I think the key thing to keep in mind is that the ends were proprietary to a parts manufacturer, not to any one railroad.  So like you car, it has the look of the year it was bought.  It's more complex than that, but you can probably find several references if you search the archives using the word dreadnought.  I have forgotten what I’ve read on the topic.  For a given date, I think it probably matters which plant was manufacturing one end or another.  For the CNR, I imagine a certain percentage of their purchases were from Canadian licensed manufacturers, and those folks may have been constrained to stay with older tooling for longer as the war was already underway up here. 

But my comments are only inference and reflecting what I have read over the years, not detailed observation or analysis.


Rob

On Dec 30, 2020, at 7:21 PM, irv_thomae <irvthomae@...> wrote:

I've been carefully studying the Ed Hawkins/Ted Culotta tabulation covering almost 93,000 AAR boxcars built between 1936 and 1947.  Having chosen long ago to model the time period from fall 1940 through summer 1941, and wanting only a few newly built cars on my back-country layout, I highlighted each group of cars built before 1940 in green, and each group built in 1940 in yellow.
  Doing that led to an interesting discovery about cars built with the standard 4-5 Dreadnaught ends:  The vast majority of those built before 1940 had square-cornered ends.  As of January of 1940, there was a dramatic transition to round-cornered ends, also known as "W corner-post."   Apart for the CN, which stayed with square corner posts through March of 1940, it appears that fewer than a dozen more cars were built with square corners from 1-40 onward, for even the smallest railroads.
  Rapid changes were not exactly common in prewar railroad engineering practice.  Does anyone happen to know why this transition, from square corner posts to the 'W' type, happened to quickly?   Was it driven by regulatory action, perhaps in response to safety issues?  Or were there dramatic savings either in weight or fabrication cost?
   And, did otherwise very similar cars with the two different corner post types show a consistent weight difference?
Thanks!
Irv


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

mel perry
 

get a cat
;-)
mel perry

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020, 8:17 AM Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...> wrote:

Good suggestion.  I do this for my historic vehicles.  For the basement I called ORKIN.  Took care of rodents and insects.

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Happel via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

 

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Mont Switzer
 

Good suggestion.  I do this for my historic vehicles.  For the basement I called ORKIN.  Took care of rodents and insects.

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Happel via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

 

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Mont Switzer
 

Todd and all,

 

Hmmm.  Maybe that is why I have a few mystery dead spots even after the track cleaner has done its thing.  I hate to think of it, but maybe a closer inspection is in order.

 

Mont    

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 11:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Joseph
 

Spider poop on models is also a problem for my stuff in display cases.  I am fed up with the 8 legged menace!

A fellow from Bird Island MN used fennel seeds to represent sugar beets.  Dowsed  in flat finish on a strip of plastic or wood painted appropriately 

Joe Binish
New Hope, MN

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 10:04 AM Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Charles Happel
 

Rodents do not care for the smell of mothballs, you might wish to consider placing a few around the layout room. I have several of the four legged variety of rodent exterminators, o no problem, but the mothballs got mice out of my garage.

Chuck Happel

We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.

Unknown


On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 11:04:33 AM EST, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:


Mont & all -

Rodents are not man's best friend when it comes to model railroads. I had several that considered peeing on the rail of my nickel silver track was great fun. It's almost impossible to get the resulting corrosion off the rails, and mouse pee does not conduct electricity (unless it's wet - ugh!).  I had to scrub the rails with baking soda, and that mostly cured the problem, but I still have conductivity problems with spots several years later.

Fie on those pesky varmints!

Todd Sullivan

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