Date   

Re: Sanding Tools

Almufti Hishman
 

Wow I have been building models for a long time, and I have to say I learned some new tricks with this excellent post.
Well done ant thanks!

Regards,
Jeff Oliver


Sanding Tools

Lester Breuer
 

Sanding tools are used on almost every freight car we build.  I have collaborated with George Toman to show the sanding tools we own and use.  If you are interested in seeing our variety of sanding tools and their uses, photos and writeup are now available on my blog I have to share photos and writeup of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following link:

 

http://mnrailroadcab100.blogspot.com/

 

 

Lester Breuer

 


Re: RE

jerryglow2
 

It occurred to me I never mentioned I have decals for the Birchfield boilers. Contact me at jerryglow at comcast dot net 


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Tony Thompson
 

Sure. But linings were often repaired or replaced.
Tony Thompson 


On Dec 31, 2020, at 4:41 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:



Well, even then, Tony, the majority of the men who noticed the change were the crews in the cars installing the lining.

 

But weren’t the linings installed at the carbuilder’s shops?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 6:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

 

Clark Propst wrote:



I’m guessing the RRs never even noticed? Because it didn’t effect the Cu ft, or tonnage, etc.

 

    Well, any work on the car lining, they sure noticed. The W corner post made the furring for lining boards much more convenient.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

irv_thomae
 

I'm very glad I asked.  I agree that Dennis's answer makes perfect sense.
Tony, I appreciate the reassurance that it was "an unobvious question."

Thanks to everyone who contributed.   I have learned a lot from all of the replies.

Wishing everyone a happier New Year than 2020 has been,
Irv


7-panel 6' Superior doors with even spacing for 10'0" IH

Andy Carlson
 

The IMWX/Red Caboose '37 AAR kits came with both Superior and Youngstown doors. You do not need to look too closely to see that these YSDs do not match very well. Apparently the CNC machine's cutting tool for the YSD's ribs broke during the door's tooling operation but the machine just kept on trucking. (The difference is that the ribs are almost square in cross section. I never paid attention to this until 25+ years ago when I was kitbashing a Youngstown door from IMWX parts and when the sections were brought together, oh my! Taught me to use the exact same donor part in these kind of kit bashings in the future.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 3:22:42 PM PST, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Al Brown wrote:

There's a photo of CGW 91014 in RP CYC 35, p 224, and it too has seven-panel doors.

    Thanks, Al. The sound you just heard was the heel of my hand denting my forehead -- I was just browsing in that RP Cyc this morning but didn't happen onto that photo -- nor did I think to look. Sigh. But thanks again.,

Tony Thompson


_._,_._,_


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Steve Wolcott
 

I made a master for a beet load using short-grain rice.  That's for S-scale, probably too big for HO. https://www.pre-size.com/products/SscaleCar_Loads.php   The same could be done with anise seed in HO.  Make a master and cast the loads with resin.  Then get the seed/rice out of the train room.
Steve Wolcott


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Well, even then, Tony, the majority of the men who noticed the change were the crews in the cars installing the lining.

 

But weren’t the linings installed at the carbuilder’s shops?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 6:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

 

Clark Propst wrote:



I’m guessing the RRs never even noticed? Because it didn’t effect the Cu ft, or tonnage, etc.

 

    Well, any work on the car lining, they sure noticed. The W corner post made the furring for lining boards much more convenient.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Douglas Harding
 

I have been using Anise seeds for sugar beet loads. I cut a piece of foam to fit the car, paint it dark brown. Then coat with glue and sprinkle anise seed. A second application of anise covers areas missed the first time.

 

I have no issues or problems with undesirables. My wife puts out small caps of vinegar which keeps the spiders away. And our four legged pets keep the mice away.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 1:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Some modelers have used anise seeds for sugar beets. Anise seeds are used as a spice.

Photo:

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0053/1247/9325/products/aniseseeds.jpg?v=1587829018

I have no idea if mice prefer these seeds.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Tony Thompson
 

Clark Propst wrote:

I’m guessing the RRs never even noticed? Because it didn’t effect the Cu ft, or tonnage, etc.

    Well, any work on the car lining, they sure noticed. The W corner post made the furring for lining boards much more convenient.

Tony Thompson




Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Clark Propst
 

I’m guessing the RRs never even noticed? Because it didn’t effect the Cu ft, or tonnage, etc.

Clark Propst

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

Tony Thompson
 

Al Brown wrote:

There's a photo of CGW 91014 in RP CYC 35, p 224, and it too has seven-panel doors.

    Thanks, Al. The sound you just heard was the heel of my hand denting my forehead -- I was just browsing in that RP Cyc this morning but didn't happen onto that photo -- nor did I think to look. Sigh. But thanks again.,

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

Eric Hansmann
 

That CB&Q boxcar is wearing some great chalk marks!


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Dec 31, 2020, at 3:41 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/16921/rec/6

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Wreck in Colorado.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

al_brown03
 

There's a photo of CGW 91014 in RP CYC 35, p 224, and it too has seven-panel doors.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/77031/rec/262


       I note the CGW box car has panel doors. Was this also true of the preceding (1944) cars, CGW 91000-91099?

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Loading Peanuts (Undated)

Patrick Wade
 

Interesting to note the wires on the insulators under the platform cover. Have never seen this before.

Pat Wade
Sant Barbara, CA

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 1:37 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Loading Peanuts (Undated)

A photo from the Norfolk Southern Corporation:

https://tinyurl.com/y8vbxxbr

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/16921/rec/6

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Wreck in Colorado.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/77031/rec/262

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Loading Peanuts (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Loading Peanuts (Undated)

A photo from the Norfolk Southern Corporation:

https://tinyurl.com/y8vbxxbr

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Tony Thompson
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

The ends were a proprietary product (also patented) so when the Standard Railway Equipment Co. changed the way the ends were to attach, everybody else, railroad and carbuilder alike, had to modify their designs. Any blurring of the actual date of change likely traces back to when exactly the contracts were signed, when the ends were ordered, etc. This is really a good example of the railroad engineering departments losing ultimate control of the design process to the vendors, a trend that would only accelerate. This same thing is very evident after the war, when SRECo. changed the designs of both the pressing pattern in the ends and also the roof. The parts were functionally interchangeable, so the change happened literally overnight.

     Perfectly stated answer to an unobvious question. Thanks, Dennis.

Tony Thompson



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