Date   

Re: Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

 

For those wanting the full resolution photo:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p15330coll22&CISOPTR=16921&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=7000&DMHEIGHT=600081

 

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Bob Chaparro via groups.io" <chiefbobbb@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, December 31, 2020 at 3:41 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

 

Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/16921/rec/6

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Wreck in Colorado.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Charging Ladles on flat cars

Tim O'Connor
 


I have photos of single ladle loads of different types. But every once in a great while you might
see something like this photo shows! :-D


On 12/22/2020 2:13 PM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD wrote:

http://www.ejearchive.com/index.php?/albums/official-loads/content/co-loads-321/lightbox/

 

Group;

 

I went back into my photos, and yes, these are charging ladles.  From their size, they are for a full-size steel-making facility.  My guess is USS Gary Works.

 

They do appear to have those cross tie-downs that make good modeling.

 

These are not the ladles you’d see in an open hearth complex, but more likely an electric arc or basic oxygen process (BOP) shop, due to the need to charge the furnace direct from these large ladles.

 

I do not see refractory in the ladles (also a great freight car load), so they can’t be modeled with some of the steel hobby models that already have it installed.

 

Why no one does a ladle load like this is beyond me.  These are a MUST for anyone modeling a RR or branch serving a steel mill.

 

Elden Gatwood



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


New year - new eBay listings

Clark Propst
 


Re: Photo: Loading Treated Water Pipe (1935)

William Jensen-Frisk
 

     Another use for the treated pipe could have been for penstocks (water supply) for water powered mills. In the Toledo, Ohio area I have seen Sanborn maps for mills along the Maumee River with the penstocks marked as being made of wood. Keeping a mill going with inexpensive water power would have been practical through the Great Depression. Before large power grids were established post WWII, it was also common for factories to have a large diesel engine generator set if the factory was electric. Some line shafted factories survived into the 1970's. After WWII electric companies offered low industrial power rates to get a big enough power usage to justify nuclear power plants, which were hoped to provide really cheap power. As part of the electric discount program the power company would supervise the destruction of the water turbines or other engine powered generators. 
    It had been cheaper to have workers tend factory electric plants than buy commercially generated power in many cases through the 1940's. Heavy electric usage, like electroplating, often had their own power plants to avoid expensive electric peak charges. 
    A penstock would lead from a water supply, like a canal, to a mill located 10 to 50 feet below the high point with a water outfall into a river or another canal. During WWI one of the Niagara Falls power stations had another penstock built of wood as a wood lined  tunnel to increase capacity without using steel or concrete. It ceased to be used after WWII. The creasoted pipes could have been replacements for a water powered mill with old penstocks. I toured a textile mill in St Catherines Ontario that made athletic jersey material that still had a water powered turbine. W Frisk


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Tim O'Connor
 


looks good! I've never liked the idea of putting anything edible on the train table... Mice will eat
just about anything. Good looking resin beet loads would be great for HO scale :-)


On 12/31/2020 8:34 PM, Steve Wolcott wrote:
I made a master for a beet load using short-grain rice.  That's for S-scale, probably too big for HO. https://www.pre-size.com/products/SscaleCar_Loads.php   The same could be done with anise seed in HO.  Make a master and cast the loads with resin.  Then get the seed/rice out of the train room.
Steve Wolcott


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Eric Lombard
 

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 07:47 AM, Eric Lombard wrote:
D&RGW 65100-65199 100 PSC 11-1939 12-1939


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Eric Lombard
 

Hello Everyone,
 
Follows some information about the transition from square corner to rounded corner Dreadnaught ends starting 1939. This information was extracted from my box car database. I believe at this stage of development  (35 years) that that data is pretty solid. However, in common with all lists, spreadsheets, etc, compiled by our fraternity it is a work in progress. In furtherment of that aim I put this information out in hopes someone might correct or add to it.
 
On the advantages of the W corner post:
"...corners have been rounded to a generous radius and W-section corner posts applied, this combination functioning to produce action to prevent the sides of the car pulling in under a heavy impact. By actual test at the University of Illinois, this end is 25 per cent stronger than the old conventional type without the round corners and the W-section corner post." Standard Railway Equipment Manufacturing Co. advertisement in 1940 Car Builders' Cyclopedia of American Practice (15th Edition).
 
It would be interesting to know about the development and testing prior to the recommendation by the AAR, apparently at the University of Illinois.
 
4-1939  Recommended use of W corner post by AAR
 
Follows is a list of all series initiated in 1939 built with W corner posts. The all-welded and singular GABX car has rounded corners but there is no information on whether it had W corner posts. Paste it up as a puzzle. 

The first application in production developed jointly by UP and Standard Railway Equipment Co. 1939[6]-1939[11] , 1200  BLT:
**1939[6]-1939[8] and 1939[10]-1939[11] 187000-187499, Omaha, NB.
**1939[6]-1939[11] 187500-188199, Grand Island, NB.
 
 
Marks Serial Qty Builder Date
GABX 1940 1 GAT 11-1938
O-WR&N 188300-188999 700 UP 6-1939 10-1939
UP 187000-188199 1200 UP 6-1939 11-1939
M-I 4000-4249 250 MTV 7-1939 8-1939
UP 9100-9199 100 UP 8-1939 10-1939
CTH&SE 19039 1 MILW 9-1939
D&RGW 68000-68399 400 PSC 9-1939 10-1939
MILW 19000-19082 82 MILW 9-1939
LAPX 101 1 PSCx-1939
MILW 18000-18999 1000 MILW 10-1939 3-1940
NYC 62000-62299 300 DSI 10-1939 x-1940
NYC 91000-91199 200 DSI 10-1939
D&RGW 65100-65199 100 PSC 1-1939 12-1939
LAPX 102-121 20 PSC 11-1939 12-1939
WM 27501-28000 500 PSC 11-1939 12-1939
NYC 176000-176199 200 DSI x-1939 x-1940
MILW 19083-19187 105 MILW 12-1939 1-1940
PRR 65400-66399 1000 PRR 12-1939 2-1940
 
Square corner Dreadnaught ends continue to be built after 5-1939: 35 series totaling 8416 cars by the end of 2-1942. Soo Line, especially, seemed to be partial to them or maybe got a price break? Nine of the last 11 series with square corners, 1600 cars built 7-1940 to 2-1942, were for Soo. To provide perspective, 70,220 cars with W corner posts in 188 series were initiated 1-1940 to 2 1942. The transition was indeed rather fast.
 
I welcome any comments, thoughts or data!
 
Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


Re: Sanding Tools

Almufti Hishman
 

Wow I have been building models for a long time, and I have to say I learned some new tricks with this excellent post.
Well done ant thanks!

Regards,
Jeff Oliver


Sanding Tools

Lester Breuer
 

Sanding tools are used on almost every freight car we build.  I have collaborated with George Toman to show the sanding tools we own and use.  If you are interested in seeing our variety of sanding tools and their uses, photos and writeup are now available on my blog I have to share photos and writeup of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following link:

 

http://mnrailroadcab100.blogspot.com/

 

 

Lester Breuer

 


Re: RE

jerryglow2
 

It occurred to me I never mentioned I have decals for the Birchfield boilers. Contact me at jerryglow at comcast dot net 


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Tony Thompson
 

Sure. But linings were often repaired or replaced.
Tony Thompson 


On Dec 31, 2020, at 4:41 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:



Well, even then, Tony, the majority of the men who noticed the change were the crews in the cars installing the lining.

 

But weren’t the linings installed at the carbuilder’s shops?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 6:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

 

Clark Propst wrote:



I’m guessing the RRs never even noticed? Because it didn’t effect the Cu ft, or tonnage, etc.

 

    Well, any work on the car lining, they sure noticed. The W corner post made the furring for lining boards much more convenient.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

irv_thomae
 

I'm very glad I asked.  I agree that Dennis's answer makes perfect sense.
Tony, I appreciate the reassurance that it was "an unobvious question."

Thanks to everyone who contributed.   I have learned a lot from all of the replies.

Wishing everyone a happier New Year than 2020 has been,
Irv


7-panel 6' Superior doors with even spacing for 10'0" IH

Andy Carlson
 

The IMWX/Red Caboose '37 AAR kits came with both Superior and Youngstown doors. You do not need to look too closely to see that these YSDs do not match very well. Apparently the CNC machine's cutting tool for the YSD's ribs broke during the door's tooling operation but the machine just kept on trucking. (The difference is that the ribs are almost square in cross section. I never paid attention to this until 25+ years ago when I was kitbashing a Youngstown door from IMWX parts and when the sections were brought together, oh my! Taught me to use the exact same donor part in these kind of kit bashings in the future.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 3:22:42 PM PST, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Al Brown wrote:

There's a photo of CGW 91014 in RP CYC 35, p 224, and it too has seven-panel doors.

    Thanks, Al. The sound you just heard was the heel of my hand denting my forehead -- I was just browsing in that RP Cyc this morning but didn't happen onto that photo -- nor did I think to look. Sigh. But thanks again.,

Tony Thompson


_._,_._,_


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Steve Wolcott
 

I made a master for a beet load using short-grain rice.  That's for S-scale, probably too big for HO. https://www.pre-size.com/products/SscaleCar_Loads.php   The same could be done with anise seed in HO.  Make a master and cast the loads with resin.  Then get the seed/rice out of the train room.
Steve Wolcott


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Well, even then, Tony, the majority of the men who noticed the change were the crews in the cars installing the lining.

 

But weren’t the linings installed at the carbuilder’s shops?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 6:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

 

Clark Propst wrote:



I’m guessing the RRs never even noticed? Because it didn’t effect the Cu ft, or tonnage, etc.

 

    Well, any work on the car lining, they sure noticed. The W corner post made the furring for lining boards much more convenient.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Douglas Harding
 

I have been using Anise seeds for sugar beet loads. I cut a piece of foam to fit the car, paint it dark brown. Then coat with glue and sprinkle anise seed. A second application of anise covers areas missed the first time.

 

I have no issues or problems with undesirables. My wife puts out small caps of vinegar which keeps the spiders away. And our four legged pets keep the mice away.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 1:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

 

Some modelers have used anise seeds for sugar beets. Anise seeds are used as a spice.

Photo:

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0053/1247/9325/products/aniseseeds.jpg?v=1587829018

I have no idea if mice prefer these seeds.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Tony Thompson
 

Clark Propst wrote:

I’m guessing the RRs never even noticed? Because it didn’t effect the Cu ft, or tonnage, etc.

    Well, any work on the car lining, they sure noticed. The W corner post made the furring for lining boards much more convenient.

Tony Thompson




Re: 1937 AAR boxcars: Dreadnaught corner posts

Clark Propst
 

I’m guessing the RRs never even noticed? Because it didn’t effect the Cu ft, or tonnage, etc.

Clark Propst

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Photo: Chicago Great Western Boxcar 92127 (1946)

Tony Thompson
 

Al Brown wrote:

There's a photo of CGW 91014 in RP CYC 35, p 224, and it too has seven-panel doors.

    Thanks, Al. The sound you just heard was the heel of my hand denting my forehead -- I was just browsing in that RP Cyc this morning but didn't happen onto that photo -- nor did I think to look. Sigh. But thanks again.,

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

Eric Hansmann
 

That CB&Q boxcar is wearing some great chalk marks!


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Dec 31, 2020, at 3:41 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: El Paso & Southwestern Automobile Boxcar 20302[?] (Undated)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/16921/rec/6

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Wreck in Colorado.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

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