Date   

Re: Charging Ladles on flat cars

David Smith
 

Love how the closest one in Tim’s photo had its spout labeled. Just in case that wasn’t obvious?

What are the ladles in the background, loaded upside down?

Dave


Re: P&LE USRA rebuild

Paul Doggett
 

Brian

That looks really good.
Paul Doggett. England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿

On 3 Jan 2021, at 03:14, Brian Carlson via groups.io <prrk41361=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

It’s. Finally. Finished.
Probably my longest semi continuous build is finally done. I’ve posted about this before.

The never-ending model build - P&LE Rebuild
• Tichy kit originally purchased 15-18 years ago at Niagara Central Hobbies in
St. Catherines Ontario for $9.99 Canadian on clearance. (~2000-2003)
• Started the build shortly after Ted Culotta’s Essential Freight Cars article on these cars in the September 2004 RMC
• Order the P&LEHS magazine that had an article on these cars
• Broke/lost crossbearers during the build, replaced with similar evergreen
channel
• Didn’t like that there was no rivet detail on the sides of the ends. Ted harvested rivets for this, I tried but found it very tedious and difficult for me
to get a straight line.
• Kitbashed/modified the doors per the article, was never happy with them.
o Put the kit aside for the first time. (mid 2000’s)
• Archer surface decals released, Yeah! solved the rivet issue. (2014 ish)
• Order Speedwitch resin doors for the car. Misplaced the doors “someplace”on the workbench, never found.
o Put kit aside again (2014 ish)
• Speedwitch Media restocks resin doors for this car, order them again 2017-2018
• Pry off my first doors and clean up the body, install Speedwitch doors.
March 2018
• Install coupler lift bars and air hose brackets. April 2018
• Install shop trucks to bring the naked model to NERPM 18 because the Accurail Andrews trucks have disappeared, or more likely were installed on another project.
• Pack naked model for NERPM 5/30/18
Future… Prime and paint model, Letter with Speedwitch decals summer 18… I hope, but now that I look at the stirrup steps I may replace them
too….Maybe.

Well, paint and decaling finally happened in 2020, (Lt wt settled slightly, ugh) and I did replace the stirrups. Andrew’s trucks were purchased in November, I think. Bought a dozen so I have some for future work.

I’m sure I am not the only one with a project like this.
*Route cards still need to be added. I need to read Tony’s blogs again. All my cars are missing them.

Brian J. Carlson

Attachments:
image0.jpeg: https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/attachment/180671/0





Re: Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

Scott Kremer
 

I was at all of your presentations at the Naperville RPM meet, including the one on the pickle/vinegar industry.  You do an outstanding job. I have your very good book on the subject.  In fact after a number of years I am now in the process of making a model of the Speas facility in Wenatchee, Wa.  I have Sanborn maps and a couple of aerial photos which should be sufficient to allow me to produce a reasonable model.  It will have to be reduced slightly in some aspects but I think it will be easily recognizable.  I am curious.  Can you explain the piping involved in the process.  I read the part about rubber instead of metal but what is not clear is where the piping runs.  I cannot find any photos that make it clear where piping is run.

Thanks for all your work,

Scott

On Jan 2, 2021, at 8:25 PM, David Leider <sooauthor@...> wrote:

Scott,
You are correct. I have photos of 3 Speas Vinegar cars in my book. There is also a 2 page history of the Speas company. I still have copies of my  "Pickle and Vinegar Makers of the Midwest" books available. A good reference for pickle and vinegar cars.


P&LE USRA rebuild

Brian Carlson
 

It’s. Finally. Finished.
Probably my longest semi continuous build is finally done. I’ve posted about this before.

The never-ending model build - P&LE Rebuild
• Tichy kit originally purchased 15-18 years ago at Niagara Central Hobbies in
St. Catherines Ontario for $9.99 Canadian on clearance. (~2000-2003)
• Started the build shortly after Ted Culotta’s Essential Freight Cars article on these cars in the September 2004 RMC
• Order the P&LEHS magazine that had an article on these cars
• Broke/lost crossbearers during the build, replaced with similar evergreen
channel
• Didn’t like that there was no rivet detail on the sides of the ends. Ted harvested rivets for this, I tried but found it very tedious and difficult for me
to get a straight line.
• Kitbashed/modified the doors per the article, was never happy with them.
o Put the kit aside for the first time. (mid 2000’s)
• Archer surface decals released, Yeah! solved the rivet issue. (2014 ish)
• Order Speedwitch resin doors for the car. Misplaced the doors “someplace”on the workbench, never found.
o Put kit aside again (2014 ish)
• Speedwitch Media restocks resin doors for this car, order them again 2017-2018
• Pry off my first doors and clean up the body, install Speedwitch doors.
March 2018
• Install coupler lift bars and air hose brackets. April 2018
• Install shop trucks to bring the naked model to NERPM 18 because the Accurail Andrews trucks have disappeared, or more likely were installed on another project.
• Pack naked model for NERPM 5/30/18
Future… Prime and paint model, Letter with Speedwitch decals summer 18… I hope, but now that I look at the stirrup steps I may replace them
too….Maybe.

Well, paint and decaling finally happened in 2020, (Lt wt settled slightly, ugh) and I did replace the stirrups. Andrew’s trucks were purchased in November, I think. Bought a dozen so I have some for future work.

I’m sure I am not the only one with a project like this.
*Route cards still need to be added. I need to read Tony’s blogs again. All my cars are missing them.

Brian J. Carlson


Re: Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

 

Sorry, I forgot to sign my name
David Leider


Re: Photo: Speas Company Vinegar Tank Car

 

Scott,
You are correct. I have photos of 3 Speas Vinegar cars in my book. There is also a 2 page history of the Speas company. I still have copies of my  "Pickle and Vinegar Makers of the Midwest" books available. A good reference for pickle and vinegar cars.


Re: Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

Tony Thompson
 

I  wrote:
I call these trucks the "long strap" Andrews, unlike the short-strap version used later, for example under USRA cars. (Referring to the steel strap that attaches to the journal boxes.) The earlier trucks are L-section sideframes too, unlike the later U-section frames. Kadee makes an L-section long-strap Andrews.
Dave Parker replied:

While there is nothing wrong withe the descriptors "long start" and "short strap", I am not aware of any real basis for saying that one came earlier than the other.  

     I agree, Dave. I didn't mean to suggest that the strap length defines time of use. I just meant that the USRA cars with Andrews trucks were substantially later than the first Andrews trucks. Obviously I wasn't clear.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

Dave Parker
 

On Sat, Jan 2, 2021 at 01:05 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
I call these trucks the "long strap" Andrews, unlike the short-strap version used later, for example under USRA cars. (Referring to the steel strap that attaches to the journal boxes.) The earlier trucks are L-section sideframes too, unlike the later U-section frames. Kadee makes an L-section long-strap Andrews.
While there is nothing wrong withe the descriptors "long start" and "short strap", I am not aware of any real basis for saying that one came earlier than the other.  The earliest evidence that I can find for what we would all probably call an Andrews truck can be found in two patents from late in 1906; the granting dates are all of two weeks apart.  US 838319 was awarded to J. Green on behalf of the short-lived Andrews & Co, and had the short strap.  US 837047 was awarded to a Mr Floyd on behalf of ASF, and had the long.  BTW, both had T-section frames, not L-section (if I am reading the drawings correctly).

By the time we get to the 1912 CBC, I count eight truck designs that are Andrews-like.  They seem to show a mix of long and short (and maybe one medium?) tie-bars.  They also have a mix of T- and L-section frames, but two have what I am tempted to call a hybrid design where the top chord is a U-section.  I have seen some examples of these "mixed chord type" trucks in prototype photos.

Last factoid:  The ASF drawing of their Vulcan truck calls it an Andrews without tie-bars.  The marketing as a Vulcan truck first appears in the 1916 edition of the CBC.
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70609 (1952)

Scott
 

Neat photo!  I wonder if that is some kind of uranium ore from Durango heading up to Grand Junction for refinement.  Could be anything I suppose but they are are not going through all that for sand or gravel.  Maybe gold or silver concentrate I suppose.

Scott McDonald


Re: Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

Tony Thompson
 

I call these trucks the "long strap" Andrews, unlike the short-strap version used later, for example under USRA cars. (Referring to the steel strap that attaches to the journal boxes.) The earlier trucks are L-section sideframes too, unlike the later U-section frames. Kadee makes an L-section long-strap Andrews.

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Re: Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

Richard Townsend
 

Kadee has made similar trucks as well.


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Jerry Michels
 

There is no specific size limitation to sugar beets.  I hand harvested acres as a grad student working field research on sugar beet root maggot. All depends on if the farmer had a good year of sun and plenty of water. Largest I ever saw were about a foot long  Tapering slowly from a good foot at the top to the end of the root. By the way, raw sugar beet root has no sweet taste, pretty bland.  The leaves, though taste similar to chard.  Jerry Michels


Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

looks good! I've never liked the idea of putting anything edible on the train table... Mice will eat
just about anything. Good looking resin beet loads would be great for HO scale :-)

   Such loads were indeed offered by Chooch, and often show up on eBay. I think they are pretty good.

Tony Thompson




Re: Sugar Beets Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70298 (1949)

Tony Thompson
 

     Almost all natural or seed products are too regular to model real sugar beets, which are, as someone said, carrots on steroids. They are strongly conical and quite variable in size. To see a good prototype photo, you may consult one of my blog posts (link below).


For S scale, I think fenugreek could work -- it is a quite irregular natural product -- but really too large for HO scale. I have tried it, and the color and shapes are pretty good, but really too big. I showed my fenugreek load in a blog post, though I really am happier with the old Chooch resin loads. (The latter are discussed in the blog post above). Here is the link to the fenugreek post:


The real "roots" (as SP crews called them) are dirty as well as irregular shapes, and I think modeling them really well is a definite challenge.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: CN Gas Tank Car 51860 (1937)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi List Members,
 
In cold areas with harsh winters railroads often used some type of switch heater apparatus to keep snow and ice from impairing the movement of switches, especially switches that are thrown remotely.
 
Today switch heaters are often powered with electricity, but in the past some type of combustible gas was often used. I recall when I was young that PC used combustible gas to heat switches in winter the Harrison NJ area for the Newark NJ station approach tracks.
 
Perhaps this is a combustible gas delivery system for such a purpose? These cars might be used to refill storage gas containers in remote locations, or the cars might just simply be parked and connected up to a gas pipe system, with the car being replaced with a fresh one when the gas runs low?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2021 12:14 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: CN Gas Tank Car 51860 (1937)

On 2021-01-01 22:09, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photo: CN Gas Tank Car 51860 (1937)

A photo from the Denver Public Library:

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/60338/rec/17

Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image.

Appears to load/unload from the car's end.

Built 1919.

Inflammable stencil.

I don't have any particular information on this car, but based upon the visible stencilled built date of 11/15 on the flat car itself, the most likely source was a CN 651264-651459 series flat car, originally built for the Canadian Government Railways as CGR 26000-26199. I see the "1/19" stencilled on the tank itself, which does provide a possible conversion date – given the unusual design of the tank, I'm inclined to think that it was specially built for this use, although one cannot rule out the possibility that it had been recycled from another use. The most recent reweigh is stencilled as "HQ 12/35", which translates to CN's Pointe St. Charles shops in Montreal.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@...

 


 


Re: Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

Dave Parker
 

I agree with what David said -- nothing out of the ordinary for the period.

That said, there must be at least six variations of the early Andrews truck in the 1912 CBC.  Although ASF was the company that marketed them as "Andrews" trucks, there were similar designs from quite a few companies.

The closest visual match in the 1912 Cyc seems to be in Fig 921, but exactly who made it is not stated.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello Dave,
 
the NPRHA has Tahoe-made trucks available which are very close:
 
http://store.nprha.org/ho-scale-nprha-special-edition-40-ton-t-section-andrews-trucks-semi-scale-wheels/
 
Greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Samstag, 02. Januar 2021 um 20:05 Uhr
Von: "Dave Lawler" <davelawler@...>
An: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

Those are rather interesting trucks on that tank car. Anyone know the manufacturer?

 

Dave Lawler

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

David
 

They look like typical L-section Andrews-style trucks. Nothing unusual there for a car built in 1910.

David Thompson


Re: Photo: Texaco Three-Compartment Tank Car 271 (1936)

Dave Lawler
 

Those are rather interesting trucks on that tank car. Anyone know the manufacturer?

 

Dave Lawler

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70609 (1952)

Richard Townsend
 

And not just any Murphy end on that SSW car. It looks like a 7/2/7. I've never seen an end like that. Or maybe it's even a 7/1/1/7 end.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Steve and Barb Hile <shile@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jan 2, 2021 10:24 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70609 (1952)

Lots of interesting stuff in this photo including the hand transfer from the narrow gauge gon to a standard gauge one.  Several oil jobbers.  NSC end on the CN boxcar, Murphy end on the SSW boxcar, etc.
 
This is one to savor.
 
Thanks,
Steve Hile
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, January 2, 2021 12:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70609 (1952)
 
Photo: D&RGW Gondola 70609 (1952)
A photo from the Denver Public Library:
Click on the double-headed arrow and then scroll to enlarge the image to get a good view of the gondola.
Taken at Montrose, Colorado.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

6561 - 6580 of 187154