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Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel. Note the unusual position of the poling pockets, and the unusual dome.
 
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


gondola NYC 715035 with load in 1960 at Lukens Steel

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Cool image of gondola NYC 715035 with load in 1960 at Lukens Steel. Note the gon has some kind of internal (possibly semi-permanent?) structure to help brace the load
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Smaller Transformers for Flat Car Loads

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

The transformers we've been talking about were pretty massive, even for 1937. I've attached some photos of much smaller transformers that were used at the Pacific Gas & Electric powerhouse in Folsom, California. These would make great freight loads for 40-ton flat cars.

This powerhouse opened in 1895, and was one end of the first successful long distance AC transmission. The other end was 22 miles away in downtown Sacramento. The Folsom powerhouse closed in the second half of the 1950s, no longer needed after the massive Folsom Dam and powerhouse went online. In 1958 the old powerhouse was donated to the California State Parks system. It is not being staffed at this time due to the plague, but IIRC was open several days a week, mostly in summer, subject to staff availability. It is a fascinating survivor of late 19th century technology and well worth a visit if you are in the Sacramento Area.

Here's the Park Service web page with some additional photos, including interior shots: http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=501 .

Wikipedia also has a page on the powerhouse: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folsom_Powerhouse_State_Historic_Park .

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Photo: MDT Reefer 5798(?)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: MDT Reefer 5798(?)

A circa 1940 photo from the Huntington Library:

https://hdl.huntington.org/digital/collection/p16003coll2/id/3170/rec/77

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

The reefer is parked in front of the Exchange Lemon Products Company plant in Corona, CA. The plant was served by the Santa Fe Railway as were most of the citrus packing houses in the immediate area.

Corona was a major lemon producing area and although this plant did pack lemons from time to time its major function was to produce lemon by-products from cull lemons.

Here are a few photos from Jim Lancaster's packing house website:

The complex at the center of the photo surrounding the tall water tank is the Exchange Lemon Products. At the upper right is the Borden Company Manufactured Products Division. At the upper left are the Corona Lemon packing house (near side of tracks) and the A. F. Call packing house (far side of tracks).

http://coastdaylight.com/scph003/18-corona_ex_lemon_cpl-5z.jpg

Exchange Lemon Products from the south in 1938.

http://coastdaylight.com/scph003/19-corona_ex_lemon_38_cpl.jpg

Aerial view of Exchange Lemon Products from the southwest in 1964.

http://coastdaylight.com/scph003/20-corona_ex_lemon_aer_64.jpg

Boxcars of cull lemons are unloaded at Exchange lemon Products by tilting the cars.

http://coastdaylight.com/scph003/23-corona_ex_lemon_cpl-6.jpg

Exchange Lemon Products was a Sunkist company. Some of you who grew up in Southern California in the 1950s may remember "Success Story", a television program sponsored by the Richfield Oil Company. This thirty minute video focuses on the Exchange Lemon Products Plant in Corona:

https://californiarevealed.org/islandora/object/cavpp%3A26989

There is no railroad content in the video. To avoid the generic program introduction you can skip to 9:10 for coverage of the plant, including the laboratory. There is some great footage of staff wrapping and packing lemons at 22:45.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, Ca


Re: Photo: SP Transformer Train (1937)

Ken Adams
 

Fascinating views of a very interesting special movement. It would be interesting to know the full routing and the work by the shipper, consignee and the carriers involved  to put together and modify the set of cars required. Did the shipment originate on the SP or an eastern road. Because of the clearances,  was it possibly carried by ship to Louisiana or Texas and loaded onto SP cars at a port there. Was this part of a US government New Deal funded project?
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: HO Truck ID?

Tony Thompson
 

RJ Dial wrote:

Richard's list is 8 years old now, many more trucks since then from Tichy and Tahoe Model Works and others.  Too bad the rights didn't pass to someone to able to keep it going. That sure was handy.

    I am the person that posted Richard's original text and all the updates he did, at his request, and I have his original writings. If there are "rights" I have them. If anyone wants to make updates, I can supply the original documents.

Tony Thompson




Helper Service: Trane Diesel Generator Inside Mechanical Reefer

Bob Chaparro
 

Helper Service: Trane Diesel Generator Inside Mechanical Reefer

Does anyone have a photo of a Trane diesel generator inside a Santa Fe mechanical reefer?

I need a photo as reference for a project.

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Re: HO Truck ID?

Bob Chaparro
 

The June 2018 issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist featured an article by Richard Bale on freight car trucks. It's an in-depth article with many illustrations.

Here is a link:

http://mrhpub.com/2018-06-jun/online/

Click on "Read Now", then go to the Table of Contents.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: 100-ton Andrews trucks in HO

Dave Parker
 

Richard:

I'm not sure your are going to get any closer than the Bowser Crowns.  Except for that photo, I don't offhand recall seeing 100-ton Andrews trucks.  There was no USRA design for them (those topped out at 70 tons), and I haven't seen a drawing or image in any of the CBCs that I have. 

I'm going to guess that the 100-ton version wasn't markedly different than a 70-ton Andrews design.  Wheelbase was probably similar (5-9?), and the ARA spec F journal boxes weren't that much larger than the spec E boxes (6.5 x 12 vs 6 x 11).

I've used the Browser trucks as a stand-in for the actual USRA 70-ton Andrews and it's a pretty good fake. They are clearly more "massive" than the 50-ton Andrews, and I think would convey a similar look on your sulfuric acid car.  Best of luck with that project.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: SP Transformer Train (1937)

Bob Chaparro
 

Transformers

Doug Auburg commented:

I’m not an expert on the cars but after working for an electrical utility for 30 years I can offer some insights on utility practices.

Transformers are shipped w/o oil to minimize their weight.  I don’t know how much these transformers from 80-plus years ago weighed but these days they weigh upwards of 300,000 pounds (or 300 tons – I can’t remember which), so any weight reduction they can achieve during shipping is a benefit.  Now days they are dried and blanketed with nitrogen.  Moisture is the enemy of transformer internals so every step is taken to keep moisture out.

So the tank cars in the train are most likely there containing transformer oil.

The cart is interesting as I’ve not seen them used in remote substations in the utility I worked for though they may have been.  My employer had a cart at its servicing facilities (called untanking towers) where the transformer’s internals are lifted out to inspect and repair.  Anyway, these carts are used to move the transformer around and minimize the number of times that riggers have to move it on cribbing.  The transformers are too heavy to be lifted by a portable crane (especially in 1937).  Fortunately, SCE had a fixed crane to transfer the transformer from the flat car to the cart.  But they would use a rigging crew, cribbing and hydraulic jacks to move the transformers off of the cart and onto the substation’s concrete pad.  In this case they apparently didn’t have a cart at this substation but they did have tracks in place so they shipped a cart along with the transformers and will return it to its storage location once they are in place.

I have no idea what they would have put in those tanks in the gondola at the front of the train.  They could have transformer oil but they seem too small. On the other hand, I’m surprised that it takes 4 tank cars full of oil to fill the 3 transformers, but apparently it did.  Remember that although the transformer tanks are large, they are filled mostly with electrical windings and supportive framework and the tank has not a bit more clearance from these internals than is required to provide a an insulating gap to prevent flashovers from the windings to the tank.

What I don’t see in these pictures are the porcelain insulators which are usually shipped in crates.  I assume they must be in the gondola(s) out of sight?

Someone named Dean commented:

A standard 14000 KVA substation transformer empty weighs 53,000 lbs.

The 4000 gallons of oil weighs 33,000 pounds. Plus, the type of oil used back in that time until 1970 was PCB based. NASTY STUFF.


Re: HO Truck ID?

Jim Betz
 

  I would be -very- surprised if anyone objects to someone taking Richard's
work and updating it ... give credit? ... just saying.  Post it here in the files
area if you do - be open to "getting help" from others who see problems in
what you do of course.

  "Too bad the rights didn't pass to someone to able to keep it going. That sure was handy."
                                                                                                - Jim


Re: Photo: SP Transformer Train (1937)

Bill J.
 

It isn’t a 2-6-2!  My count shows 2-6-0, but the dead giveaway is the 17xx number.  Valley Malleys!

Bill jolitz


Re: South Georgia Railway boxcar #1601

Larry Buell
 

I looked up South Georgia Ry. in the January, 1932 ORER . Before the addition of 1601, etc., the South Georgia only had three boxcars (5001-5003, 37’ 9-1/4” outside length) and five flats.  The January 1949 ORER only lists one box: 1600 and three flats.

L Buell


Re: Photo: NYC Flat Car S-498123 With Condenser Parts (1924)

Mike Williams
 

Does the diagram specify the wheel diameters?  The journals on the second car appear to be closer to the rails as well.


100-ton Andrews trucks in HO

Richard Townsend
 

As long as we're talking about trucks, I am looking for a pair of  HO scale 100-ton Andrews trucks, solid bearing, for a steam-era tank car I am working on. Specifically I am working on a model of OZCX 1 as shown on page 23 of the book "General American Tank Car Journeys." The 11,586-gallon car carried sulfuric acid for the Ozark-Mahoning Company. As far as I am able to tell, there are no HO scale, solid bearing,100-ton Andrews trucks. I would like to be shown to be wrong about this. The closest I have found are Bowser Crown 70-ton Andrews trucks.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Re: HO Truck ID?

radiodial868
 

Got all my trucks classified now. Sure a lot of interpretations and versions of AAR and ASF type cast frame trucks.  Richard's list is 8 years old now, many more trucks since then from Tichy and Tahoe Model Works and others.  Too bad the rights didn't pass to someone to able to keep it going. That sure was handy.

-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Re: Photo: NYC Flat Car S-498123 With Condenser Parts (1924)

Steve SANDIFER
 

Richard’s article has a list of 42’ USRA Design Flat Cars and closely Similar Cars. He shows the 496000-496299 as 42’1”. The 489500+ series were 40’10”.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Parker via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 4:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: NYC Flat Car S-498123 With Condenser Parts (1924)

 

Paul:

My notes indicate that NYC 498000-489499 were only 40-0 over end sills and had 11 stake pockets.

I think it is the 496000-496299 series that is closest to the Red Caboose model (42-1 OL, 12 pockets).  498500-498999 was sort of in between:  40-10 OL, 12 pockets.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Resin Kits that need a new home

Ross Dando
 

Only Owl Mountain Kits remain.
Thank you everyone.

Ross Dando
Meridian, Idaho


Re: Photo: NYC Flat Car S-498123 With Condenser Parts (1924)

Eric Hansmann
 

Those earlier NYC flat cars had a shallower fish belly side sill and also a fish belly center sill. Roger gave a great presentation in the NYC flat car fleet at the 2019 Chicagoland RPM. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Jan 17, 2021, at 4:30 PM, Paul Krueger <kruegerp12@...> wrote:

This is the prototype for the Red Caboose 42' flat car, isn't it? Richard's RMJ article has a question mark for the type of trucks used under this series of cars and this photo shows them very well.

http://magazine.trainlife.com/rmj_1997_1/

Paul
Seattle, WA


Re: Photo: NYC Flat Car S-498123 With Condenser Parts (1924)

Paul Krueger
 

You're right, Dave. I overlooked the dimensions on the table in Richard's article. The photo does answer the question about the trucks for this series though.

Paul
Seattle, WA

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