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Re: 100-ton Andrews trucks in HO

mopacfirst
 

When I looked closer at the 100-ton Buckeye, it's apparent that the cast brackets for the clasp brake hangers are actually separate castings.  They appear to be fastened to the truck frames by the bolts that also retain the journal boxes.  I'll bet that was fun to maintain.

It also appears that the customer's (owning railroad's) name is cast into the truck frame, above and just inboard of the far wheelset.  Other than R.R. at the end of this string of characters, I can't clearly make it out, but I'll wager it is probably a steel road.  I also think that the figures 3-21 might be cast dead center on the truck frame surface, and the pattern number and foundry symbol are above and just inboard of the near wheelset.  And, of course, the 6 1/2 X 12 on the journal boxes, just in case the shop guys might confuse them.

Ron Merrick


Re: 100-ton Andrews trucks in HO

Dave Parker
 

OK, a few nuggets of (perhaps) interest:

Along the way, we have touched on the 70-ton PRR 2E-F2 Crown and the corresponding USRA Andrews.  This is a comparison that put together a year or two ago:



I don't have any good photos of the USRA truck in service under the 70-ton USRA gondola, but what I have seems to agree with the Buckeye advert.  To my eye, the USRA 70-ton truck is just more "muscular" than the Accurail model, similarities in wheelbase and spring-box dimensions notwithstanding.

This is the original USRA drawing for their standard trucks from the April, 1918, edition of Railway Mechanical Engineer, but also reproduced in the 1919 CBC.  It's not 100% clear to me how one would translate the table of dimensions into a master for a model truck, but that's a task way beyond my skill set.  It also seems to me that the exact shape of the side-frame, especially the top chord, is not being specified, implying some latitude to the individual manufacturers (of which there were several).




Last, I have actually seen one example of a 100-ton "Andrews" truck in both the 1928 and 1931 CBCs.  I agree with Dennis that this is clearly a "special" designed by Buckeye, but the advert doesn't mention a customer for them, nor have I seen one on an actual car.



Hope this helps.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: 100-ton Andrews trucks in HO

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 10:08 PM, Dave Parker wrote:
Ya know, as soon as I sent that, I knew it wasn't quite right.  The Accurail has the longer wheelbase, and I think the larger spring box, but I don't believe the truss members are as heavy-duty as on the 70-t Andrews.
Dave is correct, the Accurail Andrews truck is the 70 ton version, as our basic truck mold has the scale 5'-8" axle spacing. I just looked through our files this morning but couldn't find any reference to what I used for reference material. It's been twenty one years, I recall whatever it was it was published in one of the CBC's, as there was not much primary material available back then.

What are you comparing the Accurail truck to? It is possible the other model truck is too bulky :-)

Visual size comparison can be a fool's errand, because there was very little dimensional difference between the trucks, other than wheelbase. In the 1922 CBC I'm finding 50 ton trucks with a lower diagonal both 2-5/8" and 2-3/4" wide, and 70 ton trucks with the same 2-3/4" dimension. The difference in the width of the journal boxes is only 1"... that's .011" in HO scale. Any of the model trucks that have more robust looking journals likely have those parts larger than scale, since the NMRA standards make it impossible to accommodate the axle cone and keep the truck anywhere near scale width.

By the way, to get back on topic, nowhere have I found a drawing of a 100 ton capacity Andrews truck. Back in those days 100 ton capacity trucks were all specials, and there were some really outlandish designs.

Dennis Storzek


Photo: SP Yard

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: SP Yard

An undated photo from the Huntington Library:

https://hdl.huntington.org/digital/collection/p16003coll2/id/21896/rec/638

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

This photo shows a great assortment of freight cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] gondola NYC 715035 with load in 1960 at Lukens Steel

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Guys;

 

Lukens was a big manufacturer of tank heads, and RRs serving them often had dedicated cars to serve that diagonal loading requirement.  RDG also had diagonal loader gons.  Even though PRR had no direct connection, they also had diagonal tank head/plate-loader gons in their G36 class and for even larger loads, in their F25 flat (well) car class (sub-classes F25B, F25C, F25D and F25E).  The latter had the floor replaced with strips of steel plate at a lower height added to accommodate the largest loads still able to fit within the clearance diagram.

 

The bracing semi-permanently applied to the gons was not consistent between RRs, but was usually heavy timbers with a diagonal top to brace the load against, and diagonally braced lengthwise, with bolts through the car side, and rods to keep the bracing from moving.  One often sees the added bolts (usually carriage bolts) added through the car side.

 

Thanks for sharing, Claus!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2021 3:59 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] gondola NYC 715035 with load in 1960 at Lukens Steel

 

Hi List Members,

 

Cool image of gondola NYC 715035 with load in 1960 at Lukens Steel. Note the gon has some kind of internal (possibly semi-permanent?) structure to help brace the load

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


Re: 100-ton Andrews trucks in HO

Dave Parker
 

Ya know, as soon as I sent that, I knew it wasn't quite right.  The Accurail has the longer wheelbase, and I think the larger spring box, but I don't believe the truss members are as heavy-duty as on the 70-t Andrews.  I'm guessing/hoping that Dennis can clarify.  He probably already has, but it's late and I'm too tired to scour the archives (mea culpa).
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: 100-ton Andrews trucks in HO

Dave Parker
 

The Accurail Andrews is based (quite accurately) on the USRA 70-ton truck, right down to the 5-8 wheelbase.

They usually don't look that large to my eye unless I put them right next to a 40- or 50-ton tuck.  Or (sometimes, I think) on a smallish freight car, like the 55-ton twin hopper.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: What's this car look like?

Clark Propst
 

Thanks! Absolutely bagged cement…Dummy me…I think the date was 55?

Clark Propst

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: 100-ton Andrews trucks in HO

radiodial868
 

In sorting through all my stash of trucks, I came across a pair Accurail Andrews (#203 w/metal wheels) trucks that are probably 70 ton but are like size gargantuan compared to Tichy and TMW Andrews trucks.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Re: What's this car look like?

Brian Shumaker
 

must have been bagged cement.


Re: What's this car look like?

Bill Parks
 

Do you know the date of the station record?  According to the Jan 1953 ORER, 573534 for the Pennsy was X29 class boxcar.

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel

Steve Summers
 

A little more background on Phenol.  I worked with Phenol years ago at Essex Magnet Wire. It’s a dangerous chemical causing burns and is absorbed through the skin, and exposure to a lot can be fatal.  To compound the problems, it’s solid at room temperature and pressure, it was stored in steam heated tanks and transfer lines.  Nasty stuff, really need to be careful around it. Hope the rail car didn’t leak!


On Jan 18, 2021, at 6:46 PM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


Friends,

Catalin Corporation of America operated just two cars in October 1958 (entry actually submitted October 1954): CCNX 1 and 4. These were both 8,000 gallon TL tank cars. The lettering seen in the second photo says "FOR PHENOL ONLY", and to the left of the ladder it says "SPECIAL NICKEL CLAD TANK CAR FOR CATALIN CHEMICALS". The address given for reporting mileage and repairs was Fords, New Jersey. The company was actually headquartered in New York.

Catalin was the brand name for a type of bakelite plastic, particularly used in buttons, costume jewelry, radios and household goods during the 1930s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalin .

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 4:00 PM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel. Note the unusual position of the poling pockets, and the unusual dome.
 
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


What's this car look like?

Clark Propst
 

Was looking at a partial page of a station record. Showed a carload of cement out of Des Moines Ia. (two cement plants there) was shocked at the initials. Here they are plus the number. Curious as to what the car looks like. PA 573534. I assume it's a Pennsy covered hopper?
Clark Propst


Re: Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

Catalin Corporation of America operated just two cars in October 1958 (entry actually submitted October 1954): CCNX 1 and 4. These were both 8,000 gallon TL tank cars. The lettering seen in the second photo says "FOR PHENOL ONLY", and to the left of the ladder it says "SPECIAL NICKEL CLAD TANK CAR FOR CATALIN CHEMICALS". The address given for reporting mileage and repairs was Fords, New Jersey. The company was actually headquartered in New York.

Catalin was the brand name for a type of bakelite plastic, particularly used in buttons, costume jewelry, radios and household goods during the 1930s: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalin .

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 4:00 PM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel. Note the unusual position of the poling pockets, and the unusual dome.
 
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Photo: NYC Flat Car S-498123 With Condenser Parts (1924)

ROGER HINMAN
 

Yes, they are 28” wheels


Roger Hinman

On Jan 18, 2021, at 9:18 AM, Mike Williams via groups.io <j3a5405@...> wrote:

Does the diagram specify the wheel diameters?  The journals on the second car appear to be closer to the rails as well.


Re: Photo: MDT Reefer 5798(?)

ROGER HINMAN
 

I couldn’t read the reweigh date on it but I suspect the date is more likely post war as the black box behind the reweigh came in about that time. Perhaps someone can ID the model year of the car parked near it.

Roger Hinman

On Jan 18, 2021, at 2:41 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: MDT Reefer 5798(?)
A circa 1940 photo from the Huntington Library:
This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.
The reefer is parked in front of the Exchange Lemon Products Company plant in Corona, CA. The plant was served by the Santa Fe Railway as were most of the citrus packing houses in the immediate area.
Corona was a major lemon producing area and although this plant did pack lemons from time to time its major function was to produce lemon by-products from cull lemons.
Here are a few photos from Jim Lancaster's packing house website:

The complex at the center of the photo surrounding the tall water tank is the Exchange Lemon Products. At the upper right is the Borden Company Manufactured Products Division. At the upper left are the Corona Lemon packing house (near side of tracks) and the A. F. Call packing house (far side of tracks).

http://coastdaylight.com/scph003/18-corona_ex_lemon_cpl-5z.jpg

Exchange Lemon Products from the south in 1938.

http://coastdaylight.com/scph003/19-corona_ex_lemon_38_cpl.jpg

Aerial view of Exchange Lemon Products from the southwest in 1964.

http://coastdaylight.com/scph003/20-corona_ex_lemon_aer_64.jpg

Boxcars of cull lemons are unloaded at Exchange lemon Products by tilting the cars.

http://coastdaylight.com/scph003/23-corona_ex_lemon_cpl-6.jpg

Exchange Lemon Products was a Sunkist company. Some of you who grew up in Southern California in the 1950s may remember "Success Story", a television program sponsored by the Richfield Oil Company. This thirty minute video focuses on the Exchange Lemon Products Plant in Corona:
There is no railroad content in the video. To avoid the generic program introduction you can skip to 9:10 for coverage of the plant, including the laboratory. There is some great footage of staff wrapping and packing lemons at 22:45.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, Ca


Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel

David
 

The poling pocket location on the bolster is typical for the GATC Type 30 underframe.

David Thompson


Re: HO Truck ID?

Ken Adams
 

The Passenger Car List has a pdf in their files section with nice new list of available passenger car trucks which shows a picture of the prototype in the left column and the pictures of available model versions in the right column to allow for more than one model version.  It was compiled by Steve Hile and several others well known in the hobby.  They have separated the list by era's when the prototype was introduced as well. 

A Freight car truck listing would probably be a much larger effort assembling the prototype photos along with taking posed model photos. . A series of offline groups might get together (electronically) to take up and publish by section. My collection of unused trucks isn't that large but I would be willing to help compile. With the new costs of Groups.io, setting up a new group here might not be the best place.  I do own a free unused legacy group from a group naming mistake if that would help. It is tightly controlled at the moment to ensure no one tries to join it. It could be repurposed and controlled for putting together parts of the list.  To be maintained it needs to be published to a tightly controlled net location that does not require membership but has tight ownership controls. I would suggest separate versions and ownerships for different scales. 
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Tank car CCNX 1 in 1955 at Lukens Steel. Note the unusual position of the poling pockets, and the unusual dome.
 
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


gondola NYC 715035 with load in 1960 at Lukens Steel

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Cool image of gondola NYC 715035 with load in 1960 at Lukens Steel. Note the gon has some kind of internal (possibly semi-permanent?) structure to help brace the load
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 

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