Date   

Re: RDG 12343 -- not hwat I expected

Paul Doggett
 

Dave 

Roof hatch’s and hopper doors 

Paul Doggett.     England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 

On 22 Jan 2021, at 21:10, Dave Nelson <Lake_Muskoka@...> wrote:



Like the old Arby’s commercial -- Me: “Where’s the Door?”… : “Where’s the Door?”

 

 

Oh….

 

https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-2nFvPnk/3/X3/i-2nFvPnk-X3.jpg

 

 

Dave Nelson


RDG 12343 -- not hwat I expected

Dave Nelson
 

Like the old Arby’s commercial -- Me: “Where’s the Door?”… : “Where’s the Door?”

 

 

Oh….

 

https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-2nFvPnk/3/X3/i-2nFvPnk-X3.jpg

 

 

Dave Nelson


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

william darnaby
 

I use Grumbacher oil paint and make washes with the turpentine replacement terpinol.  In my experience it wets and flows way better over detail with a flat finish. YMMV, of course.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Brewer
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2021 1:39 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

 

Bruce,

Thanks! I am using oil paints and Grumbacher Turpentine; I'll try an even thinner wash next time over a gloss surface.

Jim Brewer


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

James Brewer
 

Thanks Eric!

Jim Brewer


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

Eric Hansmann
 

Thanks, Jim.

 

I applied the pin wash as the first weathering layer. A flat coat had been applied before starting the weathering.

 

I had used up a bottle of Vallejo burnt umber but like most any paint bottle, it wasn’t truly empty. I added some Vallejo thinner and shook it up. That became a wash.

 

I would put a few drops on a plastic palette and transfer the material with a fine 00 brush. A broader flat brush (3/16-inches wide) was used to apply the wash on the roof, door, and the lowest side sill . The wash was only applied to metal parts.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Brewer
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2021 12:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

 

Great looking car Eric; love the weathering.

When did you apply the pin wash? I was playing around with a pin wash the other day and believe I mixed it properly; I followed mixing directions per a Mike Confalone video on MRH; however, my pin wash didn't really flow as I thought it should, or how I perceived Mike's flowing around details.  I then did a YouTube search and watched a few military modeling videos where a pin wash was added; every one of the military guys insisted the pin wash had to be applied to a glossy finish, not a flat finish. Thoughts?

Jim Brewer


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

James Brewer
 

Bruce,

Thanks! I am using oil paints and Grumbacher Turpentine; I'll try an even thinner wash next time over a gloss surface.

Jim Brewer


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

Bruce Smith
 

Jim,

I've had better luck with them on gloss finishes. Really thin is important, and while my daily goto paints are acrylic, I feel like enamels work better for pin washes... the organic solvents help them flow better, imho. You might try adding a drop of a surfactant (wetting agent) with acrylics (if you have not already done so) like photo-flo or detergent. Dot filters otoh, seem to work fine on flat surfaces. 

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn,
Al


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of James Brewer <jim.brewer.3611@...>
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2021 12:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale
 
Great looking car Eric; love the weathering.

When did you apply the pin wash? I was playing around with a pin wash the other day and believe I mixed it properly; I followed mixing directions per a Mike Confalone video on MRH; however, my pin wash didn't really flow as I thought it should, or how I perceived Mike's flowing around details.  I then did a YouTube search and watched a few military modeling videos where a pin wash was added; every one of the military guys insisted the pin wash had to be applied to a glossy finish, not a flat finish. Thoughts?

Jim Brewer


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

James Brewer
 

Great looking car Eric; love the weathering.

When did you apply the pin wash? I was playing around with a pin wash the other day and believe I mixed it properly; I followed mixing directions per a Mike Confalone video on MRH; however, my pin wash didn't really flow as I thought it should, or how I perceived Mike's flowing around details.  I then did a YouTube search and watched a few military modeling videos where a pin wash was added; every one of the military guys insisted the pin wash had to be applied to a glossy finish, not a flat finish. Thoughts?

Jim Brewer


Re: Jim Kinkaid's Freight Car Photos Collection

James Brewer
 

Clark:

Here you go:

http://www.pullmanlibrary.org/

Scroll down to the listings of  Scanned Drawings and Images.

Jim Brewer


Re: Jim Kinkaid's Freight Car Photos Collection

David North
 

A big thanks to Jim E and Jim K (and others who may have had a hand In it) for allowing us to one again access this awesome resource.

Awesome.

Cheers

Dave


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Looks great, Eric!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2021 10:18 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io; Resin Freight Car Builders <ResinFreightCarBuilders@groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Pennsy X23 HO scale

 

I started a Westerfield HO scale X23 boxcar kit in November 2015. The other morning I snapped photos of the almost completed model. It still needs Carmer uncoupling hardware. The model was painted with Vallejo amaranth red with maybe a drop or two of scarlet mixed into the paint cup. The lettering represents a post-WW1 appearance but before the revised AAR 1927 lettering guidelines for the weigh data presentation. I model late 1926.

 

I applied a pinwash of Vallejo acrylic burnt umber to the metal components as they always seem to weather differently from the wood. Prismacolor warm and cool grey pencils were used as the initial weathering layer on the sheathing. It was followed with Pan Pastel raw umber and raw umber tint applied sparingly with a micro brush and scrubbed onto the sheathing. Extra raw umber was applied to the doors for that rough Pennsy look. Pan Pastel neutral grey extra dark was scrubbed onto the roof and daubed along upper elements of the car sides and ends.

 

A Prismacolor 10% cool grey pencil was used to highlight edges and add chalk marks. Route cards and placards were added from my own artwork. The car rides on Bowser arch bar trucks with Intermountain semi-scale wheelsets. Accurail Proto:HO scale couplers and Hi-Tech air hoses are installed.

 

Someone asked about the amount of real time I have worked on this model. Here’s a summery, to the best of my recollection.

- The three-part ladders took 30-45 minutes each to prep and build.

- The car body and other details went easily, maybe three hours of work.

- Painting is a snap at about an hour, that includes car color, gloss coat, post-decal gloss coat, and the flat coat. The time doesn't include airbrush clean up as I sprayed other models during each step.

- Decal work is tedious as there were some slice-and-dice parts for the weigh date and two hours of research to determine what lettering to use and where to place it.

- Applying the weathering layers was at least two hours.

 

Adding the individual process steps comes to about 12 hours of work. The next time I build one of these, the ladders will be installed after weathering. And I really hope those ladders will be etched metal details, too.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 


Pennsy X23 HO scale

Eric Hansmann
 

I started a Westerfield HO scale X23 boxcar kit in November 2015. The other morning I snapped photos of the almost completed model. It still needs Carmer uncoupling hardware. The model was painted with Vallejo amaranth red with maybe a drop or two of scarlet mixed into the paint cup. The lettering represents a post-WW1 appearance but before the revised AAR 1927 lettering guidelines for the weigh data presentation. I model late 1926.

 

I applied a pinwash of Vallejo acrylic burnt umber to the metal components as they always seem to weather differently from the wood. Prismacolor warm and cool grey pencils were used as the initial weathering layer on the sheathing. It was followed with Pan Pastel raw umber and raw umber tint applied sparingly with a micro brush and scrubbed onto the sheathing. Extra raw umber was applied to the doors for that rough Pennsy look. Pan Pastel neutral grey extra dark was scrubbed onto the roof and daubed along upper elements of the car sides and ends.

 

A Prismacolor 10% cool grey pencil was used to highlight edges and add chalk marks. Route cards and placards were added from my own artwork. The car rides on Bowser arch bar trucks with Intermountain semi-scale wheelsets. Accurail Proto:HO scale couplers and Hi-Tech air hoses are installed.

 

Someone asked about the amount of real time I have worked on this model. Here’s a summery, to the best of my recollection.

- The three-part ladders took 30-45 minutes each to prep and build.

- The car body and other details went easily, maybe three hours of work.

- Painting is a snap at about an hour, that includes car color, gloss coat, post-decal gloss coat, and the flat coat. The time doesn't include airbrush clean up as I sprayed other models during each step.

- Decal work is tedious as there were some slice-and-dice parts for the weigh date and two hours of research to determine what lettering to use and where to place it.

- Applying the weathering layers was at least two hours.

 

Adding the individual process steps comes to about 12 hours of work. The next time I build one of these, the ladders will be installed after weathering. And I really hope those ladders will be etched metal details, too.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 


Re: Jim Kinkaid's Freight Car Photos Collection

Clark Propst
 

How do you get to the index page? I’ll like to search for RRs.

 

The dummy says thanks,

Clark Propst

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Jim Kinkaid's Freight Car Photos Collection

robertb@smartchat.net.au
 

It's interesting that at the main index there are no railroads whose reporting marks start with the letter A.

Robert Bogie

On 22/01/2021 9:43 am, David via groups.io wrote:
There are some nice photos in there, including this rather fascinating Gl hopper rebuild:
https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-T/i-8XP6Ksn/A

David Thompson





Re: USRA-style Gulf tank cars

mel perry
 

brian;
thanks, i got gypped !!!
;-(
mel perry

On Thu, Jan 21, 2021, 8:17 PM brianleppert@... <brianleppert@...> wrote:
Mel,

I have #9 in my hands right here. The last many pages cover USRA freight cars.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: USRA-style Gulf tank cars

brianleppert@att.net
 

Mel,

I have #9 in my hands right here. The last many pages cover USRA freight cars.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: USRA-style Gulf tank cars

mel perry
 

brian:
i show tsc #9 devoted to steam locomotives? do you mean tsc #12?
thanks
;-)
mel perry


On Thu, Jan 21, 2021, 5:09 PM brianleppert@... <brianleppert@...> wrote:
4 coarse shells for 10,000 capacity tanks, but these are 8,000 cap'y.  Drawings are in Train Shed Cyclopedia No. 9.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: Jim Kinkaid's Freight Car Photos Collection

bigfourroad
 

What a treasure trove -- just skimmed the C&O and that is a collection in itself and of such high quality.  Thank you to all involved.  Chris Rooney


Re: USRA-style Gulf tank cars

Dave Parker
 

Todd, there is a 44-mesage thread about "Gulf Tank Cars" from Nov. 2018, that includes quite a bit of discussion of what it takes to use a Tichy frame as a starting point for the Gulf cars built by Standard Steel ca. 1920-23.  My notes show 4000 8-kgal cars, 200 10-gal, and 50 12-kgal.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Jim Kinkaid's Freight Car Photos Collection

 

Their security certificate is probably out of date.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Almufti Hishman via groups.io" <almufti77@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, January 21, 2021 at 6:50 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Jim Kinkaid's Freight Car Photos Collection

 

I'm getting a warning from my Firefox browser about a security risk on this website.
MOZILLA_PKIX_ERROR_SELF_SIGNED_CERT
Now I do not suspect any real danger on this site, and I would not have a clue how to correct the site so this warning would not appear.
Just thought they should know some visitors are getting warned away.

regards,
Jeff Oliver

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