Date   

Re: Painting Stainless Steel Wire - Suggestions?

Robert J Miller CFA
 

From my experience working in a lumber yard many years ago the steel banding used to secure is steel just not stainless steel. Stainless is much more expensive than standard steel and we just bundled the stuff up and put it in the dumpster.

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Hutchison
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2021 7:34 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting Stainless Steel Wire - Suggestions?

 

Two questions here:

Where did you find/where can I purchase flat stainless steel wire?

When was this first used for securing wood and other loads?

Ray Hutchison
Green Bay WI


Re: IM Steel NP Reefer Production Year

Paul Krueger
 

The Amarillo RR Museum website was updated on August 7, 2000 and promotes the NP 1949 reefer as their newest car.

https://web.archive.org/web/20001018121110/http://amarillorailmuseum.com/

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Bruce Smith
 

Doug,

Raw, unshelled peanuts are best stored in cool, dry place. They keep longer in the refrigerator and even longer in the freezer than at room temperature. 

How do I know that? I googled "storage of raw peanuts" 😉

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...>
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 10:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry
 

Interesting, one photo shows sacks of peanuts being stacked inside a reefer. http://photogrammar.yale.edu/photos/service/pnp/fsa/8b23000/8b23300/8b23385v.jpg Did they need to be refrigerated until they had been roasted or boiled?

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 



Re: Painting Stainless Steel Wire - Suggestions?

Ray Hutchison
 

Two questions here:

Where did you find/where can I purchase flat stainless steel wire?

When was this first used for securing wood and other loads?

Ray Hutchison
Green Bay WI


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Allen,

Back in the early 1980s when I first came to Virginia I made some jaunts to Suffolk, one of Virginia's main peanut processing centers. The buildings I remember were mostly large early 20th century brick structures. I've attached some photos of the Norfolk, Franklin & Danville (N&W) equipment there which shows some of what I think are peanut plants in the background. I just did a search for "Peanut Suffolk Virginia images" and came up with a number of photos of the processing plants there (as well as a whole lot of extraneous garbage images). I also looked at Google maps for Suffolk. I found Birdsong Peanuts is still in business in what might be a 1950s-era plant, though this is not like the nifty brick buildings in my photos. Planters is there, but it is a sprawling modern tilt-up factory. The Lummis building, which might have been a peanut processor, is also still there, but now shuttered. It seems to be the only large brick building left. You might want to check the Sanborn maps to see how this area, or other peanut processing centers, looked years ago.

In your 1955 era, peanuts would likely have been shipped raw and in bulk using boxcars from rural collection centers, smaller versions of the Birdsong factory. A few I've seen were large corrugated steel buildings with silos. Peanuts would have been dried at places like Suffolk while still in the shell. Then some would have been packed for sale in with their shells, while others were further processed to remove the shells and inner skins, then roasted before being packaged/bagged for wholesale or retail sale.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 6:40 PM Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:
i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?

Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?

Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?

Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?

I am considering an elevator and mill using the Walthers Prairie Star Elevator and Prairie Star Mill for receiving and processing and the Walthers Prairie Co-Op elevator for originating shipments:

Receiving Elevator:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-flour-mill-elevator-prairie-star-elevator-6-3-4-x-6-x-10-quot-empty

Processing Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-prairie-star-milling-kit-8-3-4-x-12-3-4-x-9-3-4-quot-empty

Shipping Elevator:  https://www.walthers.com/prairie-co-op-elevator-kit-5-1-8-x-7-1-4-x-12-quot-13-x-18-4-x-30-4cm?ref=1

Also would the Walthers Sunshine Feed Mill as a destination for dried corn kernels:

Feed Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/sunrise-feed-mill-kit-4-x-15-1-8-x-7-3-4-quot-10-x-37-8-x-19-3cm

Any feedback and input will be appreciated.

Allen Cain


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

np328
 

Of the boxcar / covered hopper question, of the 1955 era, I will side with Doug on boxcars.
All AFE's for my researched railroad prior to, I will say the 1960s, had the justifications for covered hopper purchases tied into specific industries and so closed loop travels.   
           Other may differ for their railroad.                                                                                                                                                                   Jim Dick - Roseville, MN 


Re: Painting Stainless Steel Wire - Suggestions?

Robert kirkham
 

I can’t speak from experience with stainless, but on the Youtube “Nightshift” channel, I saw a recommendation for Mr. Metal Primer.    I bought a bottle but haven’t done much with it yet.

Rob Kirkham


On Feb 1, 2021, at 6:17 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Painting Stainless Steel Wire - Suggestions?
I have some flat stainless steel wire I need to paint black. This wire will be used to simulate banding straps used to secure loads.
Any suggestions as to how to paint the wire?
Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: IM Steel NP Reefer Production Year

Jerry Michels
 

Lester, you have the info so this is kind of a repeat. Yes we always work with the manufacturer to get multiple numbers.  Usually it is six, but has gone as high as 12.  One reason we do little to no Athearn is that they will only do one number on 600 cars.  We can't handle thousands of cars.  We did a run of Athearn airslide covered hoppers, but got them without numbers and had decals made so the buyer could appuy their own.  They sold slowly.  Way back we contracted with Kadee to do their PS-2 covered hopper for the SP with red lettering.  At that time, Kadee only allowed two numbers per run.  Shortly afterwards they did a run of the same cars for an historical society (who, I can't remember) with I think four or six numbers.  I can't confirm, but we may have been their fits non-dealer customer.  I remember some conversations kind of pointed that way.  It has been a fun  experience, and Lester got me off the dime to do our custom car history.  It still needs some updating.  Most models are sold out. What's left are on our website.

Jerry Michels


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Douglas Harding
 

Interesting, one photo shows sacks of peanuts being stacked inside a reefer. http://photogrammar.yale.edu/photos/service/pnp/fsa/8b23000/8b23300/8b23385v.jpg Did they need to be refrigerated until they had been roasted or boiled?

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 9:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

http://www.texasdailyphoto.com/2011/06/woldert-peanut-mill.html

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/search/results.php?start=0&year_start=1935&month_start=0&year_stop=1945&month_stop=12&van=CPeanuts  A peanut mill is still in operation in Comanche, TX and is rail served.  

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 8:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

In 1955, boxcars. While covered hoppers existed in the 50s, they were used for cement, carbon black, and other heavy commodities that had to be kept dry. In the 60s when larger covered hoppers were permitted, grain hoppers were designed and put into use. But in 1955 boxcars were the norm for shipping grains.

 

I don’t know about peanuts, but in the 50s a machine called a corn sheller was used to remove kernels from the cobs. Combines do that today, but didn’t come into wide spread use until the late 50s and 60s. Until then corn pickers were the norm, and they picked eared corn. The farmer often stored eared corn in open air corn cribs. Or the farmer hired someone who had a sheller to come and shell the corn so it could be stored in a sealed bin, ie a Butler bin. I believe grain elevators also owned corn shellers and could shell the corn as it was brought in for storage or sale, for a processing fee.

 

Corn cobs had many uses. On the farm they might be used in the outhouse, to start a fire, or even for livestock bedding. They are absorbent and also abrasive.  Commercial uses include cosmetic industry. Light sand blasting, animal feed. Furfural and xylose are two chemicals derived from corncobs.

 

Any of the Walthers buildings will work for corn. And perhaps for peanuts. The Feed mill was typically a place that would receive whole grains and additives, then grind the grain with the additives to make feed sold to local livestock raisers. A feed mill would also sell salt and mineral blocks and other animal feeding needs.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Allen Cain
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 5:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?

Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?

Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?

Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?

I am considering an elevator and mill using the Walthers Prairie Star Elevator and Prairie Star Mill for receiving and processing and the Walthers Prairie Co-Op elevator for originating shipments:

Receiving Elevator:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-flour-mill-elevator-prairie-star-elevator-6-3-4-x-6-x-10-quot-empty

Processing Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-prairie-star-milling-kit-8-3-4-x-12-3-4-x-9-3-4-quot-empty

Shipping Elevator:  https://www.waltherscom/prairie-co-op-elevator-kit-5-1-8-x-7-1-4-x-12-quot-13-x-18-4-x-30-4cm?ref=1

Also would the Walthers Sunshine Feed Mill as a destination for dried corn kernels:

Feed Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/sunrise-feed-mill-kit-4-x-15-1-8-x-7-3-4-quot-10-x-37-8-x-19-3cm

Any feedback and input will be appreciated.

Allen Cain


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Steve SANDIFER
 

On Google Earth go to Comanche, TX. On the north side of the track you will notice 5 round bins. Those are relatively modern and you will see a lot of covered hoppers around them. Must be harvest time for Texas peanuts. But the important part for our question is to go to the street view which has older photos, and those show the old peanut warehouse which was distinctive, similar to a cotton seed warehouse. Capture those before Google updates those photos because they are gone now. Next to it are 2, used to be three, bulk oil dealers. The depot still stands also. The tracks were Santa Fe, now Ft. Worth and Western.

 

When you are finished with peanuts, head south 20 miles on 16 to Priddy, then east on 218 to the 2nd hard left, but go right this time. The road marked 272 is a private gated road to the Comanche and Indian Gap Railroad, one of the finest 1.5” tracks you will ever see, complete with tunnels, trestles, turntables (3) and rattlesnakes. It is designed for operations. They have real steam freight cars but just not the rivet counter type. 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve SANDIFER
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 9:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

http://www.texasdailyphoto.com/2011/06/woldert-peanut-millhtml

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/search/results.php?start=0&year_start=1935&month_start=0&year_stop=1945&month_stop=12&van=CPeanuts  A peanut mill is still in operation in Comanche, TX and is rail served.  

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 8:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

In 1955, boxcars. While covered hoppers existed in the 50s, they were used for cement, carbon black, and other heavy commodities that had to be kept dry. In the 60s when larger covered hoppers were permitted, grain hoppers were designed and put into use. But in 1955 boxcars were the norm for shipping grains.

 

I don’t know about peanuts, but in the 50s a machine called a corn sheller was used to remove kernels from the cobs. Combines do that today, but didn’t come into wide spread use until the late 50s and 60s. Until then corn pickers were the norm, and they picked eared corn. The farmer often stored eared corn in open air corn cribs. Or the farmer hired someone who had a sheller to come and shell the corn so it could be stored in a sealed bin, ie a Butler bin. I believe grain elevators also owned corn shellers and could shell the corn as it was brought in for storage or sale, for a processing fee.

 

Corn cobs had many uses. On the farm they might be used in the outhouse, to start a fire, or even for livestock bedding. They are absorbent and also abrasive.  Commercial uses include cosmetic industry. Light sand blasting, animal feed. Furfural and xylose are two chemicals derived from corncobs.

 

Any of the Walthers buildings will work for corn. And perhaps for peanuts. The Feed mill was typically a place that would receive whole grains and additives, then grind the grain with the additives to make feed sold to local livestock raisers. A feed mill would also sell salt and mineral blocks and other animal feeding needs.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Allen Cain
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 5:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?

Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?

Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?

Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?

I am considering an elevator and mill using the Walthers Prairie Star Elevator and Prairie Star Mill for receiving and processing and the Walthers Prairie Co-Op elevator for originating shipments:

Receiving Elevator:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-flour-mill-elevator-prairie-star-elevator-6-3-4-x-6-x-10-quot-empty

Processing Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-prairie-star-milling-kit-8-3-4-x-12-3-4-x-9-3-4-quot-empty

Shipping Elevator:  https://www.waltherscom/prairie-co-op-elevator-kit-5-1-8-x-7-1-4-x-12-quot-13-x-18-4-x-30-4cm?ref=1

Also would the Walthers Sunshine Feed Mill as a destination for dried corn kernels:

Feed Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/sunrise-feed-mill-kit-4-x-15-1-8-x-7-3-4-quot-10-x-37-8-x-19-3cm

Any feedback and input will be appreciated.

Allen Cain


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Kenneth Montero
 

The former Suffolk Peanut Company in Suffolk, Virginia, had rail access. It has been added to the National Registry of Historical Places. See below for a detailed description of the facility:
 
 
It is being converted to apartments - but see the video for pictures of the existing structures.
 
 
Ken Montero
 
 

On 02/01/2021 10:10 PM Steve SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...> wrote:
 
 

http://www.texasdailyphoto.com/2011/06/woldert-peanut-mill.html

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/search/results.php?start=0&year_start=1935&month_start=0&year_stop=1945&month_stop=12&van=CPeanuts  A peanut mill is still in operation in Comanche, TX and is rail served.  

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 8:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

In 1955, boxcars. While covered hoppers existed in the 50s, they were used for cement, carbon black, and other heavy commodities that had to be kept dry. In the 60s when larger covered hoppers were permitted, grain hoppers were designed and put into use. But in 1955 boxcars were the norm for shipping grains.

 

I don’t know about peanuts, but in the 50s a machine called a corn sheller was used to remove kernels from the cobs. Combines do that today, but didn’t come into wide spread use until the late 50s and 60s. Until then corn pickers were the norm, and they picked eared corn. The farmer often stored eared corn in open air corn cribs. Or the farmer hired someone who had a sheller to come and shell the corn so it could be stored in a sealed bin, ie a Butler bin. I believe grain elevators also owned corn shellers and could shell the corn as it was brought in for storage or sale, for a processing fee.

 

Corn cobs had many uses. On the farm they might be used in the outhouse, to start a fire, or even for livestock bedding. They are absorbent and also abrasive.  Commercial uses include cosmetic industry. Light sand blasting, animal feed. Furfural and xylose are two chemicals derived from corncobs.

 

Any of the Walthers buildings will work for corn. And perhaps for peanuts. The Feed mill was typically a place that would receive whole grains and additives, then grind the grain with the additives to make feed sold to local livestock raisers. A feed mill would also sell salt and mineral blocks and other animal feeding needs.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Allen Cain
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 5:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?

Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?

Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?

Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?

I am considering an elevator and mill using the Walthers Prairie Star Elevator and Prairie Star Mill for receiving and processing and the Walthers Prairie Co-Op elevator for originating shipments:

Receiving Elevator:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-flour-mill-elevator-prairie-star-elevator-6-3-4-x-6-x-10-quot-empty

Processing Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-prairie-star-milling-kit-8-3-4-x-12-3-4-x-9-3-4-quot-empty

Shipping Elevator:  https://www.waltherscom/prairie-co-op-elevator-kit-5-1-8-x-7-1-4-x-12-quot-13-x-18-4-x-30-4cm?ref=1

Also would the Walthers Sunshine Feed Mill as a destination for dried corn kernels:

Feed Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/sunrise-feed-mill-kit-4-x-15-1-8-x-7-3-4-quot-10-x-37-8-x-19-3cm

Any feedback and input will be appreciated.

Allen Cain

 


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Steve SANDIFER
 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 8:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

In 1955, boxcars. While covered hoppers existed in the 50s, they were used for cement, carbon black, and other heavy commodities that had to be kept dry. In the 60s when larger covered hoppers were permitted, grain hoppers were designed and put into use. But in 1955 boxcars were the norm for shipping grains.

 

I don’t know about peanuts, but in the 50s a machine called a corn sheller was used to remove kernels from the cobs. Combines do that today, but didn’t come into wide spread use until the late 50s and 60s. Until then corn pickers were the norm, and they picked eared corn. The farmer often stored eared corn in open air corn cribs. Or the farmer hired someone who had a sheller to come and shell the corn so it could be stored in a sealed bin, ie a Butler bin. I believe grain elevators also owned corn shellers and could shell the corn as it was brought in for storage or sale, for a processing fee.

 

Corn cobs had many uses. On the farm they might be used in the outhouse, to start a fire, or even for livestock bedding. They are absorbent and also abrasive.  Commercial uses include cosmetic industry. Light sand blasting, animal feed. Furfural and xylose are two chemicals derived from corncobs.

 

Any of the Walthers buildings will work for corn. And perhaps for peanuts. The Feed mill was typically a place that would receive whole grains and additives, then grind the grain with the additives to make feed sold to local livestock raisers. A feed mill would also sell salt and mineral blocks and other animal feeding needs.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Allen Cain
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 5:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?

Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?

Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?

Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?

I am considering an elevator and mill using the Walthers Prairie Star Elevator and Prairie Star Mill for receiving and processing and the Walthers Prairie Co-Op elevator for originating shipments:

Receiving Elevator:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-flour-mill-elevator-prairie-star-elevator-6-3-4-x-6-x-10-quot-empty

Processing Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-prairie-star-milling-kit-8-3-4-x-12-3-4-x-9-3-4-quot-empty

Shipping Elevator:  https://www.waltherscom/prairie-co-op-elevator-kit-5-1-8-x-7-1-4-x-12-quot-13-x-18-4-x-30-4cm?ref=1

Also would the Walthers Sunshine Feed Mill as a destination for dried corn kernels:

Feed Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/sunrise-feed-mill-kit-4-x-15-1-8-x-7-3-4-quot-10-x-37-8-x-19-3cm

Any feedback and input will be appreciated.

Allen Cain


Re: Box Car Pbotos

Tom Madden
 

Thanks, Steve. As I said, it was our honeymoon and everything was rosy. And Ektachromey. 


Tom Madden


Re: Box Car Pbotos

Steve SANDIFER
 

With a little color correction. Tanks Tom.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Madden via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 8:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Box Car Pbotos

 

Here ya go, Bill. Taken at Grand Canyon on our honeymoon, September 1961. The Santa Fe reefer bible says it was formerly a Bx-3, renumbered from the 115xxx series of ice reefers in 1959..

Tom Madden


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Steve SANDIFER
 

Corn cobs were used as animal feed.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of earlyrail
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 8:35 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry
From: Allen Cain
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2021 15:40:28 PST
<<i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

<<How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?

1955 would be box cars for 99% of grains moved.

 

<<Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?

Corn would be shelled either on the farm of in some case at the elevator.

Would not be shipped by rail on the cob.

 

<<Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?

I do not know this one.

 

<<Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?

There are used today for ground corn cobs.  I do not kow of any from the 50's (except rear end usage:)

Howard Garner

 


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Mont Switzer
 

At the elevator in the small town I grew up in (Indiana 1950's-60's) they shelled corn for farmers.  The corn cobs were gravity fed into a cob burner.  I used to watch the whole operation from the school where I was supposed to be paying attention to other things.  

Mont Switzer

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of earlyrail [cascaderail@...]
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 9:35 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry
From: Allen Cain
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2021 15:40:28 PST
<<i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

<<How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?
1955 would be box cars for 99% of grains moved.

<<Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?
Corn would be shelled either on the farm of in some case at the elevator.
Would not be shipped by rail on the cob.

<<Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?
I do not know this one.

<<Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?
There are used today for ground corn cobs.  I do not kow of any from the 50's (except rear end usage:)
Howard Garner


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

Douglas Harding
 

In 1955, boxcars. While covered hoppers existed in the 50s, they were used for cement, carbon black, and other heavy commodities that had to be kept dry. In the 60s when larger covered hoppers were permitted, grain hoppers were designed and put into use. But in 1955 boxcars were the norm for shipping grains.

 

I don’t know about peanuts, but in the 50s a machine called a corn sheller was used to remove kernels from the cobs. Combines do that today, but didn’t come into wide spread use until the late 50s and 60s. Until then corn pickers were the norm, and they picked eared corn. The farmer often stored eared corn in open air corn cribs. Or the farmer hired someone who had a sheller to come and shell the corn so it could be stored in a sealed bin, ie a Butler bin. I believe grain elevators also owned corn shellers and could shell the corn as it was brought in for storage or sale, for a processing fee.

 

Corn cobs had many uses. On the farm they might be used in the outhouse, to start a fire, or even for livestock bedding. They are absorbent and also abrasive.  Commercial uses include cosmetic industry. Light sand blasting, animal feed. Furfural and xylose are two chemicals derived from corncobs.

 

Any of the Walthers buildings will work for corn. And perhaps for peanuts. The Feed mill was typically a place that would receive whole grains and additives, then grind the grain with the additives to make feed sold to local livestock raisers. A feed mill would also sell salt and mineral blocks and other animal feeding needs.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Allen Cain
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2021 5:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

 

i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?

Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?

Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?

Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?

I am considering an elevator and mill using the Walthers Prairie Star Elevator and Prairie Star Mill for receiving and processing and the Walthers Prairie Co-Op elevator for originating shipments:

Receiving Elevator:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-flour-mill-elevator-prairie-star-elevator-6-3-4-x-6-x-10-quot-empty

Processing Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/cornerstone-series-r-prairie-star-milling-kit-8-3-4-x-12-3-4-x-9-3-4-quot-empty

Shipping Elevator:  https://www.walthers.com/prairie-co-op-elevator-kit-5-1-8-x-7-1-4-x-12-quot-13-x-18-4-x-30-4cm?ref=1

Also would the Walthers Sunshine Feed Mill as a destination for dried corn kernels:

Feed Mill:  https://www.walthers.com/sunrise-feed-mill-kit-4-x-15-1-8-x-7-3-4-quot-10-x-37-8-x-19-3cm

Any feedback and input will be appreciated.

Allen Cain


Re: Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry

earlyrail
 

Corn and Peanut Processing and Transportation Industry
From: Allen Cain
Date: Mon, 01 Feb 2021 15:40:28 PST
<<i am working on an industry involving milled corn and/or processed peanuts in 1955 in the South.  Could use some help on the concept.

<<How would peanuts and corn be transported to elevators and mills for processing?  Box cars or covered hoppers?
1955 would be box cars for 99% of grains moved.

<<Where would the corn kernels be separated from the cob and the corn kernels dried?
Corn would be shelled either on the farm of in some case at the elevator.
Would not be shipped by rail on the cob.

<<Where would the peanuts be separated from the shells?
I do not know this one.

<<Would there be a by-product use for the cobs and/or peanut shells and if so, how would they be transported?
There are used today for ground corn cobs.  I do not kow of any from the 50's (except rear end usage:)
Howard Garner


Re: Box Car Pbotos

Tom Madden
 

Here ya go, Bill. Taken at Grand Canyon on our honeymoon, September 1961. The Santa Fe reefer bible says it was formerly a Bx-3, renumbered from the 115xxx series of ice reefers in 1959..

Tom Madden


Painting Stainless Steel Wire - Suggestions?

Bob Chaparro
 

Painting Stainless Steel Wire - Suggestions?

I have some flat stainless steel wire I need to paint black. This wire will be used to simulate banding straps used to secure loads.

Any suggestions as to how to paint the wire?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

7221 - 7240 of 188580