Date   

SP Gondola

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Friends,

Yesterday while thrashing around on the web in old copies of CALIFORNIA HIGHWAYS AND PUBLIC WORKS magazines, I ran across this mid-1930s photo taken at Roseville on the SP. It shows what appears to be a G-50-6 or G-50-8 gondola. 

Also take note of the interesting automobiles and trucks. That brick building with the Co-Cola (to use a southernism) sign was still there when I was last in Roseville about 10 years ago.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Re: Technique for gluing .005" styrene sheet laminations w/o scalloping and warping

O Fenton Wells
 

Wowzer Andy, Thanks for that.  I'll give it a try
Fenton

On Tue, Feb 9, 2021 at 11:12 PM Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:
I found a method of glueing 0.005" styrene to a base styrene years ago which has stood the test of time. In pattern making, weakly attached laminations can often delaminate when pulling an RTV mold from the pattern in the mold box. Here is my solution in avoiding warping and sclloped edges. I have shared this to the list years ago, but it is simple.

I place the 0.005" styrene piece in the location for which it is destined to be attached. A light pencil mark around the perimeter allows me to brush on a somewhat thin coat of a slow drying styrene cement. I use liquid Testors from the bottle. The trick is to allow the Testors to flash off; immediately after the liquid dissapearing, place the 0.005" piece where it is intended to be.

What we are doing here is leaving just enough to bond, but not with any extra solvent. By doing it this way, no residual solvent is left behind attacking the 0.005" piece over time. Since no solvent was applied to the edge of the thin sheet of styrene, there is no scalloping which distorts the edges.

I do believe the slower evaporating solvents are necessary for this to work. No MEK, Tenax or Acetone, please! The bond is lifetime long and will not come unattached making this ideal for patterns which will go into a mold box.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Tuesday, February 9, 2021, 6:42:06 PM PST, Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:


I was looking at the .005" diagonal straps used on a recent single sheathed boxcar project - and noted that there were small divots in the surface of the straps.   Its an age-old problem when using thin styrene.   Yes, I know there are other materials out there, and one could instead use CA.

But I was wondering: are there any ways to improve my technique?  Or ways to dilute the strength of the glue so it works fine, but does't cause divots? 

Has anyone developed a tried and true reliable process?  

So far, I just use glazing putty to fix the problem.  Not an ideal solution!

Rob Kirkham



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Technique for gluing .005" styrene sheet laminations w/o scalloping and warping

Andy Carlson
 

I found a method of glueing 0.005" styrene to a base styrene years ago which has stood the test of time. In pattern making, weakly attached laminations can often delaminate when pulling an RTV mold from the pattern in the mold box. Here is my solution in avoiding warping and sclloped edges. I have shared this to the list years ago, but it is simple.

I place the 0.005" styrene piece in the location for which it is destined to be attached. A light pencil mark around the perimeter allows me to brush on a somewhat thin coat of a slow drying styrene cement. I use liquid Testors from the bottle. The trick is to allow the Testors to flash off; immediately after the liquid dissapearing, place the 0.005" piece where it is intended to be.

What we are doing here is leaving just enough to bond, but not with any extra solvent. By doing it this way, no residual solvent is left behind attacking the 0.005" piece over time. Since no solvent was applied to the edge of the thin sheet of styrene, there is no scalloping which distorts the edges.

I do believe the slower evaporating solvents are necessary for this to work. No MEK, Tenax or Acetone, please! The bond is lifetime long and will not come unattached making this ideal for patterns which will go into a mold box.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Tuesday, February 9, 2021, 6:42:06 PM PST, Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:


I was looking at the .005" diagonal straps used on a recent single sheathed boxcar project - and noted that there were small divots in the surface of the straps.   Its an age-old problem when using thin styrene.   Yes, I know there are other materials out there, and one could instead use CA.

But I was wondering: are there any ways to improve my technique?  Or ways to dilute the strength of the glue so it works fine, but does't cause divots? 

Has anyone developed a tried and true reliable process?  

So far, I just use glazing putty to fix the problem.  Not an ideal solution!

Rob Kirkham


Re: gluing .005" styrene sheet laminations

Rich C
 

Rob, I have used Canopy Glue on .005 styrene with good results, no melting, no deformities, no mess

Rich Christie


Re: F&C meat reefer prototypes

nyc3001 .
 

Tim,

There are photos of a completed model at this link. 

https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/built-rtr-wilson-car-lines-wcl-funaro-1800129209

-Phil


gluing .005" styrene sheet laminations

Robert kirkham
 

I was looking at the .005" diagonal straps used on a recent single sheathed boxcar project - and noted that there were small divots in the surface of the straps.   Its an age-old problem when using thin styrene.   Yes, I know there are other materials out there, and one could instead use CA.

But I was wondering: are there any ways to improve my technique?  Or ways to dilute the strength of the glue so it works fine, but does't cause divots? 

Has anyone developed a tried and true reliable process?  

So far, I just use glazing putty to fix the problem.  Not an ideal solution!

Rob Kirkham


Hindsight 20/20 7.0 Virtual RPM

Ryan Mendell
 

The signup for the next Hindsight Virtual RPM is now active. 

Please go to speedwitchmedia.com to register for the event.

Ryan Mendell


Re: F&C meat reefer prototypes

O Fenton Wells
 

These are early F&C kits, so the chances of a photo are 2.....slim and none


On Tue, Feb 9, 2021 at 8:35 PM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Photos show several different designs for Wilson 37 foot reefers, and there are more still
for the other owners. Does anyone have a photo of the completed F&C kit?


On 2/9/2021 5:09 PM, nyc3001 . wrote:

Fenton,

I don't own any of the kits, but they come with either WCLX, CRLX version, or Oscar Mayer decals.

The side and end castings appear the same for all of these.

-Phil



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: F&C meat reefer prototypes

Tim O'Connor
 


Photos show several different designs for Wilson 37 foot reefers, and there are more still
for the other owners. Does anyone have a photo of the completed F&C kit?


On 2/9/2021 5:09 PM, nyc3001 . wrote:

Fenton,

I don't own any of the kits, but they come with either WCLX, CRLX version, or Oscar Mayer decals.

The side and end castings appear the same for all of these.

-Phil



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: F&C meat reefer prototypes

O Fenton Wells
 

My guess is whoever manufactured the Wilson reefers would be a close fit. 
I’m getting ready to bash a bunch of 37 and 40 ft meat reefers and have been accumulating magazine articles by Martin Loftin, Greg Martin John Nerich and others from the late ‘80’s and early 90’s. 
Then Sunshine showed up and bashing lost favor. I still prefer bashing so I’m off to the meat reefer races
Fenton 


On Feb 9, 2021, at 7:45 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:



The Rapido car is a specific prototype, built by General American between 1937-1941. Other 37’ meat reefers were built by other manufacturers with different features. And each meat packer had specific features they wanted in their cars. So lots of variety. Just ask the guys trying to figure out the Swift reefer fleet.

 

I don’t know what prototype F&C used for their early meat reefer, but they offered it with a number of different meat company decals. So generic at best.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of nyc3001 .
Sent: Tuesday, February 9, 2021 3:57 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] F&C meat reefer prototypes

 

Hi guys,

An early F&C kit was the 37' wood meat reefer. I was looking at images of it, and it seems to be a different prototype from the Rapido reefer (wider fascia below the roofline and perhaps a lower door).

Does anyone know what the prototype is?

Thanks,
Phil


Re: F&C meat reefer prototypes

Douglas Harding
 

The Rapido car is a specific prototype, built by General American between 1937-1941. Other 37’ meat reefers were built by other manufacturers with different features. And each meat packer had specific features they wanted in their cars. So lots of variety. Just ask the guys trying to figure out the Swift reefer fleet.

 

I don’t know what prototype F&C used for their early meat reefer, but they offered it with a number of different meat company decals. So generic at best.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of nyc3001 .
Sent: Tuesday, February 9, 2021 3:57 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] F&C meat reefer prototypes

 

Hi guys,

An early F&C kit was the 37' wood meat reefer. I was looking at images of it, and it seems to be a different prototype from the Rapido reefer (wider fascia below the roofline and perhaps a lower door).

Does anyone know what the prototype is?

Thanks,
Phil


Re: F&C meat reefer prototypes

nyc3001 .
 

Fenton,

I don't own any of the kits, but they come with either WCLX, CRLX version, or Oscar Mayer decals.

The side and end castings appear the same for all of these.

-Phil


Re: F&C meat reefer prototypes

O Fenton Wells
 

What does the label say. They made a few different ones


On Feb 9, 2021, at 4:57 PM, nyc3001 . <nyc3001@...> wrote:

Hi guys,

An early F&C kit was the 37' wood meat reefer. I was looking at images of it, and it seems to be a different prototype from the Rapido reefer (wider fascia below the roofline and perhaps a lower door).

Does anyone know what the prototype is?

Thanks,
Phil


F&C meat reefer prototypes

nyc3001 .
 

Hi guys,

An early F&C kit was the 37' wood meat reefer. I was looking at images of it, and it seems to be a different prototype from the Rapido reefer (wider fascia below the roofline and perhaps a lower door).

Does anyone know what the prototype is?

Thanks,
Phil


Re: Loading Ice With Block & Tackle Gear

Dennis Storzek
 

Yes. Although when running with ice they use a standard hatch plug to seal the bunker. The idea behind the big boxy ventilator was to make a place for that plug to be raised while still providing security. There was additional features of the Bohn system on the bunker wall, hidden inside the car.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Loading Ice With Block & Tackle Gear

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
Are these cars equipped with what I have seen refered to as 'Bohn Ventilators'?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 09, 2021 2:09 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Loading Ice With Block & Tackle Gear

Loading Ice With Block & Tackle Gear

A 1915 photo from the Huntington Library:

https://hdl.huntington.org/digital/collection/p16003coll2/id/15122/rec/64

Description:

"Lordsburg Ice Plant - Men loading large blocks of ice into cold storage freight cars with block & tackle."

The town of Lordsburg, CA, was incorporated as La Verne in 1906. The town, about thirty miles east of Los Angeles, was served by the Santa Fe.

What is interesting about this photo is that it shows the eventually outdated practice of loading (not dropping) whole ice blocks into the bunker of a refrigerator car. Besides being labor intensive and time consuming, whole blocks did not cool loads as efficiently as quartered and smaller pieces of ice.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Re: Pacific Electric

Tim O'Connor
 


Unfortunately, I think it's more complicated for photographs - There are "photographer's lifetime" provisions in there.


On 2/9/2021 2:52 AM, Dave Nelson wrote:

Everything created on or before Dec 31, 1925 is in the public domain.

FWIW, Public Domain Day (the name is my idea) occurs on Jan 1 of every year and I’m pretty sure that all items copyright registered 95 (longest protection) +1 years ago all move to the public domain.  This being 2021 then  2021-95 = 1926 – 1 year = everything in 1925.

 

Dave Nelson



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Loading Ice With Block & Tackle Gear

Bob Chaparro
 

Loading Ice With Block & Tackle Gear

A 1915 photo from the Huntington Library:

https://hdl.huntington.org/digital/collection/p16003coll2/id/15122/rec/64

Description:

"Lordsburg Ice Plant - Men loading large blocks of ice into cold storage freight cars with block & tackle."

The town of Lordsburg, CA, was incorporated as La Verne in 1906. The town, about thirty miles east of Los Angeles, was served by the Santa Fe.

What is interesting about this photo is that it shows the eventually outdated practice of loading (not dropping) whole ice blocks into the bunker of a refrigerator car. Besides being labor intensive and time consuming, whole blocks did not cool loads as efficiently as quartered and smaller pieces of ice.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Re: AP article on model railroading today...

Tim O'Connor
 


Many bargains to be had out there on Ebay, Dennis! Those ancient blue box Athearn locos just
keep going and going... But yeah, if you shop for -current- trains the list prices remind me of when
I was a teenager and AHM locomotives (with pizza cutter wheels) listed for what seemed like
insane prices at the time (~1970) - I remember my Dad paid $50 or so (a fortune to me) for an
AHM articulated steam locomotive. Accounting for inflation that would be something like $500
today - can you imagine? :-D

The North Shore club has been buying and re-selling train collections for 40+ years... The "flea
market" tables at the Springfield train show always do a brisk business. Old freight cars with Kadee
couplers sell for $3 to $5 dollars... that's much cheaper than they were when I was a kid! (After I
take inflation into account.)


On 2/8/2021 9:03 AM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 02:30 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:
Lets rethink this for a moment. Walthers has brand new Accurail boxcars on sale for $12.98.
Well, we try. The real problem, as I see it, is the disappearance of $40 locomotives to pull those cars.

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Pacific Electric

Tony Thompson
 

Dave Nelson wrote:

Everything created on or before Dec 31, 1925 is in the public domain.

No. Everything COPYRIGHTED before that dat is in the public domain. I already explained the difference. Read what I wrote.

Tony Thompson



6121 - 6140 of 187735