Date   

Re: Foobie

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Expressing my crusty old fart side . . . (sorry)

 

I am of the opinion that the difference between Fu . . . and Fo . . . UP BEYOND ALL . . .

 

Trending toward the first, is an example of the degeneration of causal speech occurring all through the English speaking people, at least in the US.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 11:24 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

 


I agree Tony - I think that is how I understood it the first time I heard it. I'd heard FUBR (beyond repair)
FUBAR (beyond all recognition) variants expressed in Hollywood movies (usually comedies) that I saw on
television as a child although any that explained it always said it meant "fouled up..." - which in those days
was not far from the common  sense of it as used by gentle folk.

Also "foo" itself was widely popular in computer software source code by the 1970's - I never gave it much
thought about how it became so popular but it could certainly have the same origin.


Why is there a resistance to FUBAR as the origin? One can readily describe a lame model with the words behind that acronym (whichever word starting with "F" you prefer). It has always seemed to me that "foobie" is a natural descendant. Tony Thomson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Model Box Car End ID

Tim O'Connor
 


unquestionably Intermountain :-)

On 2/17/2021 10:54 AM, golden1014 via groups.io wrote:
Astute STMFC Modelers,

These box car ends have been in my parts box for years.  Does anybody know the manufacturer?

Danke!
John Golden

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Foobie

Tim O'Connor
 


I agree Tony - I think that is how I understood it the first time I heard it. I'd heard FUBR (beyond repair)
FUBAR (beyond all recognition) variants expressed in Hollywood movies (usually comedies) that I saw on
television as a child although any that explained it always said it meant "fouled up..." - which in those days
was not far from the common  sense of it as used by gentle folk.

Also "foo" itself was widely popular in computer software source code by the 1970's - I never gave it much
thought about how it became so popular but it could certainly have the same origin.


Why is there a resistance to FUBAR as the origin? One can readily describe a lame model with the words behind that acronym (whichever word starting with "F" you prefer). It has always seemed to me that "foobie" is a natural descendant. Tony Thomson
--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Foobie

Ken O'Brien
 

As an old AF aviator, those expressions were in use back when Jimmy Doolittle was a Captain. Definitely is use in Viet Nam.


Re: Request help for a 1928 Equipment Register

Dave Parker
 

This is a case where the tank-car tariff books can really help clarify things relative to what you can tease out of an ORER..  As per the 1936 edition, RGOX 234 had a dome volume of 256 gal, very typical of the the GA 1917 design cars.  Others in the 201-255 series with the same dome size:  201, 203-210, 226-240.  So, it looks like 24 similar cars (at most), rather than 55.  No guarantee that all 24 cars were of the same design as #234, but it's a reasonable guess.

Hope this helps.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Foobie

Randy Hammill
 

Except I think that he was using the term long before fake boobies became a common enough thing to spawn the word.

Note that the urban dictionary shows a whole bunch of definitions, and that one isn’t listed as the most recent.

I’ve always thought it was a friendlier variation of FUBAR, and my usage is based on that definition.

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Re: Photo: Mostly Gondolas (Circa 1940s)

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Feb 24, 2021 at 06:46 AM, Mont Switzer wrote:
.........and the sides most likely were shot and needed replacement anyway. However, the stamped side panels obviously would cost more.
Unless... The stamped side panels also included the stakes, saving the fabrication of separate parts. I haven't had any occasion to research replacement gondola sides, but as far as hopper sides are concerned, very few cars used separate framing as modeled on the Tichy car. Early on Union Metal Products revised their product to include "integral stakes", each edge of the sheet being flanged outward to form half a stake, which were welded together after the sheets were riveted to the side sills.

Dennis Storzek


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

gary laakso
 

Elden:

 

Thanks, that is what I was looking for!  What color is the casting?  Maybe GSC did not white wash all their castings for the cameras!

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 6:23 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

 

Gary;

 

How about this one:  PRR FD1 casting on PRR F31A, 1951.

 

I have another somewhere of the F30A castings upside down shipped on a series of flats, but can’t find it.  There are also photos of loco frames on flats out there.  I have seen several.

 

PRR F30A, F41 and FD1 were all GSCC products.

 

They were loaded as raw castings, by overhead crane, unloaded by same, and then had all gear installed by PRR shops.  I have a “bare” F30A shot if you are interested.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 3:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

 

GSC was located in Eddystone, PA, near the Baldwin Locomotive Works.  GSC supplied the industry with one piece engine beds/frames with cylinders cast integrally, tender trucks, tender under frames and trailer trucks.  Great Northern used their products in locomotive rebuilds and new construction as did other carriers.  It appears that Lima used GSC castings and I assume that ALCO did as well. 

 

Has anyone seen pictures of these castings enroute to end users or being unloaded? 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 


Re: Seeking Logos For Bulk Oil Tanks

William Hirt
 

Microscale still has decal sets available in HO and N scale for Gulf and Flying A.

Dave's Decals has sheets for companies Microscale no longer offers and a number of the regionals.

<https://www.davart.net/?product_cat=4000-gas-oil&v=7516fd43adaa>

I used his Skelly decals for a bulk oil dealer I built for a friend's layout.

Bill Hirt

On 2/23/2021 11:54 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
Is there a decal set that features the logos (Gulf, Flying A, etc.) for the ends of the tanks at a bulk oil distributor?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Bill.Pardie


Re: Photo: Mostly Gondolas (Circa 1940s)

Mont Switzer
 

..........and the sides most likely were shot and needed replacement anyway. However, the stamped side panels obviously would cost more. Good way to make an older car worth hanging onto.

Mont Switzer
________________________________________
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Benjamin Hom [b.hom@att.net]
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 5:52 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Mostly Gondolas (Circa 1940s)

Jerry Michels asked:
"...how did the volume increase on twin hopper increase over the normal plain side versions?"

Reported volume for the rebuilds varied depending on the vendor supplying the sides, but one example for the USRA twin:

Original Car: 1880 cu ft
NYCS Lots 639-H, 640-H, 641-H, 645-H, 651-H, 655-H (1,877 cars): 1980 cu ft
Increase in cubic capability: 100 cu ft, 5.3%


Ben Hom


Re: Request help for a 1928 Equipment Register

Steve and Barb Hile
 

It looks like there were about 55 of these cars, as of October 1926 ORER

 

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Andy Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 6:40 AM
To: STMFC E-List <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Request help for a 1928 Equipment Register

 

From Ted Cullota's series of books, "Focus on the Freight Car
vol ten other freight car types" has some great photos of various tank cars pictured from the 1930s. One of particular interest to me is the Rio Grande Oil Co., R.G.O.X. 234. The 10000 gallon tank car is a type 17 GATC design.

 

I would like to know if any of these cars date back to 1928 and if so, what numbers were assigned?

 

Thanks for any help for this project.

 

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA

 

Inline image

Inline image

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Red Owl warehouse

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

I may have missed my mark.

 

PRR created the X54 to provide Campbell’s Soup in particular, a fleet of cars for which they could avoid dependence on gathering enough other cars to meet their daily needs.

 

Many customers of the PRR asked PRR for dedicated or purpose-built cars.  By the fifties, they had to comply.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 5:01 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Red Owl warehouse

 

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 01:16 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:


Have you ever spent time inside a closed freight car sitting in bright sunlight for a week?

How 'bout a week at -20 deg. F? Guaranteed to freeze the contents and burst the cans. There is a reason for modern RBL's.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Seeking Logos For Bulk Oil Tanks

Jared Harper
 

I was told that the D&D bulk plant at Alma, KS, had a large White Eagle logo on a metal sign.  i went on line and found what I needed, printed it, cut it out and glued it to the end of the warehouse.

Jared Harper


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Gary;

 

How about this one:  PRR FD1 casting on PRR F31A, 1951.

 

I have another somewhere of the F30A castings upside down shipped on a series of flats, but can’t find it.  There are also photos of loco frames on flats out there.  I have seen several.

 

PRR F30A, F41 and FD1 were all GSCC products.

 

They were loaded as raw castings, by overhead crane, unloaded by same, and then had all gear installed by PRR shops.  I have a “bare” F30A shot if you are interested.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 3:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

 

GSC was located in Eddystone, PA, near the Baldwin Locomotive Works.  GSC supplied the industry with one piece engine beds/frames with cylinders cast integrally, tender trucks, tender under frames and trailer trucks.  Great Northern used their products in locomotive rebuilds and new construction as did other carriers.  It appears that Lima used GSC castings and I assume that ALCO did as well. 

 

Has anyone seen pictures of these castings enroute to end users or being unloaded? 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Stencil On CB&Q Boxcar

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Tony;

 

Good question.  I will have to look into that.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 3:05 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Stencil On CB&Q Boxcar

 

Elden Gatwood wrote:



Destroyed or disposed of dedicated equipment was especially costly, while shovel-out and/or steam-cleaning less so.  Loss of things like cross-bars and belts, were very expensive, since you had to go back to Evans, for example, for replacements.

 

But many of the GA-E cars were leased to the railroads. Did not the lessor own that loader equipment?

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

It does!

 

Good to see you still participating.  Great issue of TKM!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of naptownprr
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 3:59 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

 

Thanks, Elden.  I guess I'm being too obvious.

 

Jim Hunter


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of naptownprr <jhunter@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 3:54 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [External] Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

 

This message was sent from a non-IU address. Please exercise caution when clicking links or opening attachments from external sources.

 

I suggest that "foobie" may have some relation to "boobie."

 

Jim Hunter


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 2:49 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [External] Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

 

This message was sent from a non-IU address. Please exercise caution when clicking links or opening attachments from external sources.

 

Guys;

 

I can attest to the fact that “foobie” was a term in use in SoCal while I was living there, mid-late 80’s at earliest, early 90’s at latest, to refer to a certain part of female anatomy enhanced or altered, thereby, not real, but fake.

 

I suspect, not fact, that it originated in surfer & skateboard cultures, since that is where I first heard its frequent usage.

 

It has been taken up by others, but I heard it many times in bars, surf hangouts, restaurants, etc., in that timeframe.

 

It is good use of that term in our hobby!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 2:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

 

I thought "foobie" had some relationship to "FUBAR." F[ouled] up beyond all recognition.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Feb 23, 2021 11:27 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

Dave

I searched through my saved emails archive and the earliest use of the term (which was clearly already
in use at the time) was back in 2007. I also searched through my archive of saved rec.models.railroad
(the old Usenet) messages and there are no occurrences of "foobie" - but I found MANY uses of the word
"bogus". So my guess is that we began using the word sometime around the start of the century. :-P

Here is a July 2009 email from David Hussey -

From: "dh30973" <dhussey@...>
Subject: [MFCL] What constitutes a Foobie?

What constitutes a Foobie? After reading all this debate, maybe we need to grade them.

Foobie 1a: An accurate car with minor mistakes in decorating (dates, COTS, ACI, capacity)
Foobie 1b: An accurate car with major mistakes in decorating (wrong number series, wrong color)

Foobie 2: A semi accurate car with detail mistakes for the decorating (wrong roof walk, high vs low brake)

Foobie 3: An semi-inaccurate car for the decorating (wrong door size)

Foobie 4: A car that is right for one scheme and totally bogus for others (The B&0 40 Hi-Cube, F box decorated for xxx)

Foobie 5: A Stand In, Something close in detail with an accurate scheme (Maybe the same F Box decorated for xxx)

Foobie 6: Nothing correct (Tyco warbonnet GP20)

Your mileage and rating can (and will) vary.

Someone's Foobie can be another person's favorite model, until "we" collectively rain on their parade. Maybe we can get the NMRA to require this printed on the box after a select secret panel votes on the rating.

Tongue somewhat firmly planted in cheek<g>.

Dave Hussey


On 2/23/2021 1:11 PM, Dave Nelson wrote:

I always assumed it was a Richard Hendrickson-ism.  It’s been on used on STMFC for such a long time, probably going all the way back to Tim O’Connor’s e-mail list.

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ray Hutchison
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 4:28 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

 

....I first started seeing it on the Steam Era Freight Car list (STMFC) with a RR twist."  

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: ACL paint scheme

Ed Mims
 

Old painting and stencil drawings in my collection indicate that the ACL began painting flat cars black in about 1927. At least the oldest drawing I have with black paint specified was revised in 1927 to change to black. Before that they were painted dark green as shown in the revision notes on several drawings. Interestingly enough trucks on flat cars were painted with black "asphaltum" which may have been the material which was later referred to as car cement. More research is needed on this. So, I think John Golden is correct that gons and flats were "always black" at least after 1927. It is possible that all open top cars were painted black beginning in 1927 or there about.

The stencil color on all black open top cars is shown as white.

Ed Mims


Request help for a 1928 Equipment Register

Andy Carlson
 

From Ted Cullota's series of books, "Focus on the Freight Car
vol ten other freight car types" has some great photos of various tank cars pictured from the 1930s. One of particular interest to me is the Rio Grande Oil Co., R.G.O.X. 234. The 10000 gallon tank car is a type 17 GATC design.

I would like to know if any of these cars date back to 1928 and if so, what numbers were assigned?

Thanks for any help for this project.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

Inline image
Inline image



Re: Foobie

O Fenton Wells
 

As an old submariner, with diesel exhaust and hydraulic oil still in my system I can attest to that, the we used it on the 'boats' was a little less gentlemanly, I'm afraid.
Just say'in
Fenton

On Wed, Feb 24, 2021 at 7:10 AM Marty McGuirk <mjmcguirk@...> wrote:
FUBAR is indeed a Navy expression- dating to at least WWII and is still in use today. Heard it in a meeting yesterday in fact ...
And the Navy context, and I believe Richard’s use of the derivative foobie, has nothing to do with boobies. 

Marty McGuirk




On Feb 23, 2021, at 6:56 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 02:47 PM, Richard Townsend wrote:
And as you said, Tony, didn't our late resident linguist say 'foobie" was derived from "FUBAR?" That seems pretty authoritative to me.
Because FUBAR is an acronym... and it would have worked just as well as a noun. Stands to reason that since the F and U are important to the message being conveyed, that they would be retained in the new form; FUBEE, or FUBIE, with some descriptive words chosen so the result was still an acronym. Since such is not the case, I'm of the opinion that the origin is a contraction of "fake boobies", since fake is the demeaning idea Sir Richard wanted to convey. It doesn't make any difference if "foobie" never entered the general language; someone would only have to hear it once to latch on to it. Foobie certainly has the sound of the drivel TV writers have been pushing on use for the last sixty or so years.

As Smokey Stover would say, "Where there's foo there's fire!"

Dennis Storzek



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Foobie

Marty McGuirk
 

FUBAR is indeed a Navy expression- dating to at least WWII and is still in use today. Heard it in a meeting yesterday in fact ...
And the Navy context, and I believe Richard’s use of the derivative foobie, has nothing to do with boobies. 

Marty McGuirk




On Feb 23, 2021, at 6:56 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 02:47 PM, Richard Townsend wrote:
And as you said, Tony, didn't our late resident linguist say 'foobie" was derived from "FUBAR?" That seems pretty authoritative to me.
Because FUBAR is an acronym... and it would have worked just as well as a noun. Stands to reason that since the F and U are important to the message being conveyed, that they would be retained in the new form; FUBEE, or FUBIE, with some descriptive words chosen so the result was still an acronym. Since such is not the case, I'm of the opinion that the origin is a contraction of "fake boobies", since fake is the demeaning idea Sir Richard wanted to convey. It doesn't make any difference if "foobie" never entered the general language; someone would only have to hear it once to latch on to it. Foobie certainly has the sound of the drivel TV writers have been pushing on use for the last sixty or so years.

As Smokey Stover would say, "Where there's foo there's fire!"

Dennis Storzek

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