Date   

Re: Foobie

spsalso
 

But, but, but you just added another post!

And so did I, just now!


Arghhhh.....


Ed

Edward Sutorik


For Throwback Thursday: Santa Fe express boxcar 4155

Richard Scott
 

For Throwback Thursday I’m posting this photo of my new O‑scale Santa Fe express boxcar, a recent pandemic project.  It started out as an automobile car that the late Jim Pierce built from a vintage Athearn kit.  I bought it from Jim and ran it for thirty years before rebuilding it as an Fe‑24 express car.

During the rebuild I stripped the car’s silk-screened sides, replaced its rough stamped metal doors and roof walks with scratchbuilt parts, and added bracket grab irons and brake hoses.  I painted it with Scalecoat and Floquil enamels, and lettered it with Protocraft decals.  This livery was applied to Santa Fe’s 300 Fe‑24 express cars from 1943 until 1958.

I have an album featuring some of my freight car models on the first page of our photo section.  These cars are all O scale and include everything from scratchbuilds to modified RTR cars.  I hope you will enjoy looking through them.

Dick Scott

 


Re: Seeking Logos For Bulk Oil Tanks

Jeff Ford
 

Bill,

Microscale did sets to letter the City Classics HO gas station kit.  The Flying A set is 87-874 and the Gulf set is 87-902. 

Happy hunting.
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, TX


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Tony Thompson
 

Bill Jolitz wrote:

Canned goods in reefers!  June thru Sept.  Wondering why.  What does RR Bob have to say?

       Until the early 1950s, the "insulated boxcar of the day" was the ordinary reefer. Everything from pharmaceuticals to dry goods to canned goods moved routinely in reefers if weather extremes were expected. 
      Numerous cargoes of these kinds are described in the PFE book.

Tony Thompson




Re: Red Owl warehouse

Bill J.
 

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 09:14 AM, Clark Propst wrote:
Red Owl foods had grocery stores in Minnesota and some in surrounding states. They had a warehouse in Hopkins Minn. on the M&StL. I was given a seal book to transcribe from the middle on 1949 to Jan 1950. I have two canneries on my layout ad deliver reefers to them to ship out their canned goods. So far I've put three months worth of car loads into Excel. Out of curiosity I added up the canned goods cars so far. Canned goods are not all veggies, but this is what data I have. There are 12 reefers and 63 others, I'm assuming box cars, I haven't added ORER data yet. I guess I need to setout a few box cars once in awhile too?
Clark 
Canned goods in reefers!  June thru Sept.  Wondering why.  What does RR Bob have to say?

Bill Jolitz


Re: F&C meat reefer prototypes

nyc3001 .
 

Philip,

I think the Roundhouse roof is a fairly standard tongue and groove wood roof. It doesn't appear dissimilar to the one on the ARLX 11000 series car.

-Phil


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Mostly Gondolas (Circa 1940s)

Philip Dove
 

The Mssouuri Pacific car I was referring to,  was part of a class of 2,400 gondolas built in 3 lots for the Mopac and subsidiaries between 1937 and 1942 that were built new with paneled sides according to the data sheet that comes with the F&C kit . In 1949 Mopac built similar Gondolas in house but didn't bother with the special panels. I was surprised on reading the information to see that the panels were not a replacement item. I understood that by the late 1930s the panels were going out of favour as railroads realised they tended to rust out more quickly than flat sheets. Would a load of sand be sheeted over to stop the load blowing away? What would the tarps if any look like?

Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 at 16:53, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Guys;

 

At least on PRR:  early gon and hopper side replacements involved removing the rivets, then replacement of side panels or boards, followed by re-riveting, painting and lettering.

 

As time went by and labor costs rose, replacements were more unitary, like the combined partial side panel and stake replacements used on the H21E, for example.  Four pieces for each side, IIRC.

 

By the sixties, PRR had moved to entire side replacements, stakes and all.  That included things like Stanray corrugated sides with integral stakes.

 

Just one example…

 

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:19 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Mostly Gondolas (Circa 1940s)

 

On Wed, Feb 24, 2021 at 06:46 AM, Mont Switzer wrote:

.........and the sides most likely were shot and needed replacement anyway. However, the stamped side panels obviously would cost more.

Unless... The stamped side panels also included the stakes, saving the fabrication of separate parts. I haven't had any occasion to research replacement gondola sides, but as far as hopper sides are concerned, very few cars used separate framing as modeled on the Tichy car. Early on Union Metal Products revised their product to include "integral stakes", each edge of the sheet being flanged outward to form half a stake, which were welded together after the sheets were riveted to the side sills.

Dennis Storzek


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Foobie

George Kristy
 

I can't believe that there have been so many posts on such a useless topic!!


Re: Foobie

Tony Thompson
 

Marty McGuirk wrote:

1. Other Fouled has a specific meaning on a ship, No self respecting sailor would ever say Fouled Up when he or she meant Fu…. 

     And of course "fouled up" is the euphemism. Anyone with any time in or around the military is very familiar with that other "F" word. An observer of the British army once said that the F-word only means a noun or verb is coming.

Tony Thompson




Re: Foobie

Tony Thompson
 

Marty McGuirk wrote:

FUBAR is indeed a Navy expression- dating to at least WWII and is still in use today. Heard it in a meeting yesterday in fact ...
And the Navy context, and I believe Richard’s use of the derivative foobie, has nothing to do with boobies. 

Full agreement, Marty.

Tony Thompson




Re: Foobie

Benjamin Hom
 

Marty McGuirk wrote:
"Other Fouled has a specific meaning on a ship, No self respecting sailor would ever say Fouled Up when he or she meant Fu...."

Concur. This thread is FUMTU.


Ben Hom


Thanks for the help from a 1928 Equipment Register

Andy Carlson
 

Thanks Dave and Steve. This info works very well for me.
Another great example of the shared help available from this fine list.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA







Re: Foobie

Tim O'Connor
 


Perhaps not; unless one were discussing the native birds of the Solomon Islands with the professor. :-D

Do boobies build foobies? (desperately trying to steer back in the general direction of freight cars...)


On 2/24/2021 11:55 AM, Marty McGuirk wrote:
Couple of thoughts on what is rapidly steaming towards off topic -
1. Other Fouled has a specific meaning on a ship, No self respecting sailor would ever say Fouled Up when he or she meant Fu.... 
2. I enjoyed many conversations with the late Doctor H over the years - and simply can’t imagine him ever saying  “boobie” - in any context. 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Gary;

 

You are welcome.

 

They were a dull grey from the factory, probably primer.  They made so many, I expect they just primed all but the advertising one.


Here’s a GSC cast F30A after the trucks and brake gear/airlines were installed.  They came in upside down on flat cars with blocking.

 

PRR painted them FCC and lettered them right before weighing.  Then came the LT WT/CAP data.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:10 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

 

Elden:

 

Thanks, that is what I was looking for!  What color is the casting?  Maybe GSC did not white wash all their castings for the cameras!

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 6:23 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

 

Gary;

 

How about this one:  PRR FD1 casting on PRR F31A, 1951.

 

I have another somewhere of the F30A castings upside down shipped on a series of flats, but can’t find it.  There are also photos of loco frames on flats out there.  I have seen several.

 

PRR F30A, F41 and FD1 were all GSCC products.

 

They were loaded as raw castings, by overhead crane, unloaded by same, and then had all gear installed by PRR shops.  I have a “bare” F30A shot if you are interested.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 3:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Moving General Steel Castings

 

GSC was located in Eddystone, PA, near the Baldwin Locomotive Works.  GSC supplied the industry with one piece engine beds/frames with cylinders cast integrally, tender trucks, tender under frames and trailer trucks.  Great Northern used their products in locomotive rebuilds and new construction as did other carriers.  It appears that Lima used GSC castings and I assume that ALCO did as well. 

 

Has anyone seen pictures of these castings enroute to end users or being unloaded? 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 


Re: Foobie

Marty McGuirk
 

Couple of thoughts on what is rapidly steaming towards off topic -
1. Other Fouled has a specific meaning on a ship, No self respecting sailor would ever say Fouled Up when he or she meant Fu.... 
2. I enjoyed many conversations with the late Doctor H over the years - and simply can’t imagine him ever saying  “boobie” - in any context. 



On Feb 24, 2021, at 11:35 AM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:



Expressing my crusty old fart side . . . (sorry)

 

I am of the opinion that the difference between Fu . . . and Fo . . . UP BEYOND ALL . . .

 

Trending toward the first, is an example of the degeneration of causal speech occurring all through the English speaking people, at least in the US.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 11:24 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

 


I agree Tony - I think that is how I understood it the first time I heard it. I'd heard FUBR (beyond repair)
FUBAR (beyond all recognition) variants expressed in Hollywood movies (usually comedies) that I saw on
television as a child although any that explained it always said it meant "fouled up..." - which in those days
was not far from the common  sense of it as used by gentle folk.

Also "foo" itself was widely popular in computer software source code by the 1970's - I never gave it much
thought about how it became so popular but it could certainly have the same origin.


Why is there a resistance to FUBAR as the origin? One can readily describe a lame model with the words behind that acronym (whichever word starting with "F" you prefer). It has always seemed to me that "foobie" is a natural descendant. Tony Thomson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Mostly Gondolas (Circa 1940s)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Guys;

 

At least on PRR:  early gon and hopper side replacements involved removing the rivets, then replacement of side panels or boards, followed by re-riveting, painting and lettering.

 

As time went by and labor costs rose, replacements were more unitary, like the combined partial side panel and stake replacements used on the H21E, for example.  Four pieces for each side, IIRC.

 

By the sixties, PRR had moved to entire side replacements, stakes and all.  That included things like Stanray corrugated sides with integral stakes.

 

Just one example…

 

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:19 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Mostly Gondolas (Circa 1940s)

 

On Wed, Feb 24, 2021 at 06:46 AM, Mont Switzer wrote:

.........and the sides most likely were shot and needed replacement anyway. However, the stamped side panels obviously would cost more.

Unless... The stamped side panels also included the stakes, saving the fabrication of separate parts. I haven't had any occasion to research replacement gondola sides, but as far as hopper sides are concerned, very few cars used separate framing as modeled on the Tichy car. Early on Union Metal Products revised their product to include "integral stakes", each edge of the sheet being flanged outward to form half a stake, which were welded together after the sheets were riveted to the side sills.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Foobie

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Expressing my crusty old fart side . . . (sorry)

 

I am of the opinion that the difference between Fu . . . and Fo . . . UP BEYOND ALL . . .

 

Trending toward the first, is an example of the degeneration of causal speech occurring all through the English speaking people, at least in the US.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 11:24 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobie

 


I agree Tony - I think that is how I understood it the first time I heard it. I'd heard FUBR (beyond repair)
FUBAR (beyond all recognition) variants expressed in Hollywood movies (usually comedies) that I saw on
television as a child although any that explained it always said it meant "fouled up..." - which in those days
was not far from the common  sense of it as used by gentle folk.

Also "foo" itself was widely popular in computer software source code by the 1970's - I never gave it much
thought about how it became so popular but it could certainly have the same origin.


Why is there a resistance to FUBAR as the origin? One can readily describe a lame model with the words behind that acronym (whichever word starting with "F" you prefer). It has always seemed to me that "foobie" is a natural descendant. Tony Thomson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Model Box Car End ID

Tim O'Connor
 


unquestionably Intermountain :-)

On 2/17/2021 10:54 AM, golden1014 via groups.io wrote:
Astute STMFC Modelers,

These box car ends have been in my parts box for years.  Does anybody know the manufacturer?

Danke!
John Golden

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Foobie

Tim O'Connor
 


I agree Tony - I think that is how I understood it the first time I heard it. I'd heard FUBR (beyond repair)
FUBAR (beyond all recognition) variants expressed in Hollywood movies (usually comedies) that I saw on
television as a child although any that explained it always said it meant "fouled up..." - which in those days
was not far from the common  sense of it as used by gentle folk.

Also "foo" itself was widely popular in computer software source code by the 1970's - I never gave it much
thought about how it became so popular but it could certainly have the same origin.


Why is there a resistance to FUBAR as the origin? One can readily describe a lame model with the words behind that acronym (whichever word starting with "F" you prefer). It has always seemed to me that "foobie" is a natural descendant. Tony Thomson
--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Foobie

Ken O'Brien
 

As an old AF aviator, those expressions were in use back when Jimmy Doolittle was a Captain. Definitely is use in Viet Nam.

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