Date   

Re: L&N Woodrack -- 3

Bob Chapman
 

Mont says:
Your jig for making the end bulkheads is interesting. Can you share from what the job is constructed? We all know that assembling styrene components in a styrene jig usually doesn’t go well.
 
Mont --
The jig is styrene (painted grey for contrast in the photo). Yeah, the solvent gets into everything. On the jig I left some extra space at each bulkhead joint, which helped a bit. And when gluing with the bulkhead in the jig, I used very sparing amounts of solvent for the first pass. Once dry and part removed from the jig, I then drowned the joint as usual.
 
Regards,
Bob Chapman
 
p.s. Thanks to all for the kind words.


Reweigh dates on freight cars

Fran Giacoma
 

Base upon the article "ReWeigh Dates on Freight Cars" by Tony Thompson (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bz_ctrHrDz4wOWM4YzU5MGYtMTdjNC00MmQwLWEyZDgtMjJiMDUzMTZhMmZm/view)
I have started to add this detail to applicable cars on my HO B&O Shenandoah SD set in late September 1956. The majority of my cars will fall in the 48 month catagory as described at the end of his article and also in Table 1. How steadfast was this rule? Would you see some cars say 3 months beyond the 48 months not done?
Thanks.
Fran Giacoma


Re: Emailing: IMG_5838, IMG_5841

Chad Boas
 

And I have the main Monon 40' flat car casting if anyone needs a base.
Chad Boas


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Clark Propst
 

I received an email stating a certain car was a PS1 with 7’ door. That’s the type of correction I was hoping for! The more info I add the more chances for mistakes. This is the best place I could think of to get them corrected.

 

My wife has been transcribing CGW train list for Jason Klocke. Thousands of entries! More super good stuff, but there’s an overload point me thinks…

Clark

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Clark Propst
 

Todd also asked: “It also raises lots of questions about where cars came from and where the loads out were going.  E.g., where did all that sugar in NP boxcars come from?  I don't suppose the seal books have origin or destination information?

 

Some of the seals did have the RR of origin. Others may have the place, but I have no way of knowing what That may have been. I may go back and add a column for seal origins?

 

I have to assume that Groceries out were to satellite warehouses or team tracks in towns with more than one store?

 

Im thinking of using this info in a Hindsight 20/20 clinic down the road. I think a grocery warehouse would work well on the small shelf layouts that car in vogue now. We all have lots of box cars  ;  ))

 

Clark

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Clark Propst
 

Todd wrote: “I did find one set of questionable initials = SLRX (St Louis Refrigerator Line - beer), which I think should be SRLX (Swift Refrigerator Line - meat).

 

The data was written with old style cursive letters. When I added the ORER info I found Id made several mistakes. I went back and worth between SRLX and SLRX. I found that my lettering was correct and the numbers matched the ORER. Strange I know.

Clark

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Clark Propst
 

Doug Harding wrote: “From a Sanborn Map it looks like the warehouse was served by the GN, with the MSTL tracks across the street. The MILW would have been near by. https://www.loc.gov/resource/g4144mm.g04339195006A/?sp=45&r=-0.005,0.919,0.835,0.53,0

 

Interesting. A question for Vern Wigman. Jason Klocke has an M&StL annual report talking about a produce addition in the late 50s they erected the Red Owl water tower at that time.

Clark

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Red Owl warehouse

earlyrail
 

Sugar in NP box cars was probably from the Red River Valley of the Dakotas and Minnesota.
Howard Garner


Emailing: IMG_5838, IMG_5841

Mont Switzer
 

Mike, Eldon and all,

The info that I have shows the MONON had two designs of composite coke cars. CIL 1019 is a former low side stone gon onto which the composite coke body was lowered and secured. MON 1033 shows a different design like MON 1028 that Mike shared. Same base car, but gon posts have been removed and different coke body lowered into place. I suspect that this later version was actually a composite boxcar body with the roof and doors removed before being lowered onto the former stone gon.

The MONON's Lafayette, IN SHOPS made all kinds of cars from these extremely sturdy 1920's era low side composite gondolas. In addition to the coke cars, there were head end cabooses, general service flat cars, and TOFC flat cars. All sorts of company service cars were constructed including wheel cars, boom cars and even a pile driver.

It is my understanding that the stone gons were constructed by Pullman in on-line Michigan City and hauled without wood components to the Monon's Lafayette Shops where they were completed.

The "do it yourself" nature of the Monon's car shops makes for some interesting modeling projects.

Mont
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Re: L&N Woodrack -- 3

Mont Switzer
 

Bob,

 

Your work is top drawer as always.  Your jig for making the end bulkheads is interesting.  Can you share from what the job is constructed?  We all know that assembling styrene components in a styrene jig usually doesn’t go well.

 

Mont

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chapman
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2021 2:40 PM
To: STMFC E-List <main@Realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] L&N Woodrack -- 3

 

Unique among L&N’s woodracks were the #20100-20199 “shorties” – 36-footers with inset bulkheads, rebuilt in 1943 from ventilated boxcars. The model was scratchbuilt from styrene, with the usual freight car detail additions. 

 

Regards,

Bob Chapman

 

Attachments:


Re: Burning Box Car

Philip Dove
 

the undersides of cars catching fire from the friction of brakes was a reality. In 1983 on thecp at the Spiral tunnels We passed a freight train coming down and a high proportion of the cars were smoking and some had flames around their trucks or smoke from  near the middle. The engineer told me this was the older clasp brakes setting fire to the accumulated dirt underneath the car. It was a normal occurence on westbound freight trains and rarely spread to the cars structure, before it cooled down.

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Douglas Harding
 

Todd the sugar is interesting. Sugar beets were a common crop in Northern Iowa and Minnesota in 1949, with several sugar beet processing plants in the region. The NP could also have been hauling Hawaiian cane sugar from the PNW ports.

 

I also question the SLRX cars, whose reporting marks are often confused with Swift SRLX marks. But the numbers do match SLRX cars. Could the loads have been mis-labeled to reduce pilferage?

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Todd Sullivan via groups.io
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2021 8:46 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Red Owl warehouse

 

Hi Clark,

Wow!  That Excel workbook is a labor of love. 

It also raises lots of questions about where cars came from and where the loads out were going.  E.g., where did all that sugar in NP boxcars come from?  I don't suppose the seal books have origin or destination information?

I did find one set of questionable initials = SLRX (St Louis Refrigerator Line - beer), which I think should be SRLX (Swift Refrigerator Line - meat).  See rows 184-185.

Otherwise, a great wealth of information to ponder.

Thanks!!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Richard Townsend
 

Yeah, I think the SLRX should be SRLX. A common mistake. But what a job of putting this spreadsheet together! What struck me was the Hershey’s cars. I wonder if they did multiple deliveries per car, like some of the Swift cars did.


On Feb 26, 2021, at 6:46 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

Hi Clark,

Wow!  That Excel workbook is a labor of love. 

It also raises lots of questions about where cars came from and where the loads out were going.  E.g., where did all that sugar in NP boxcars come from?  I don't suppose the seal books have origin or destination information?

I did find one set of questionable initials = SLRX (St Louis Refrigerator Line - beer), which I think should be SRLX (Swift Refrigerator Line - meat).  See rows 184-185.

Otherwise, a great wealth of information to ponder.

Thanks!!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Clark,

Wow!  That Excel workbook is a labor of love. 

It also raises lots of questions about where cars came from and where the loads out were going.  E.g., where did all that sugar in NP boxcars come from?  I don't suppose the seal books have origin or destination information?

I did find one set of questionable initials = SLRX (St Louis Refrigerator Line - beer), which I think should be SRLX (Swift Refrigerator Line - meat).  See rows 184-185.

Otherwise, a great wealth of information to ponder.

Thanks!!

Todd Sullivan


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Douglas Harding
 

Fantastic job Clark. Lots of great information for the grocery business. Interesting that they only got nine loads of meat during this time period. And even more interesting three of those meat loads arrived in SLRX cars, ie Anheuser Busch beer cars. I’m going to assume most meat arrived via truck as did all dairy products.

 

From a Sanborn Map it looks like the warehouse was served by the GN, with the MSTL tracks across the street. The MILW would have been near by. https://www.loc.gov/resource/g4144mm.g04339195006A/?sp=45&r=-0.005,0.919,0.835,0.53,0

 

Red Owl was started in 1922 in Rochester MN, and opened their store in Hopkins in 1948, just the year before your report. This is soon after Western Grocer, a large grocery distributor based in Marshalltown IA was sold to an eastern conglomerate, who was consolidating the grocery industry.

 

Here is a photo of the plant in Hopkins https://hclib.tumblr.com/post/55193243271/new-red-owl-plant-in-hopkins-once-a-common-sight

Supervalu still has a large distribution center at this location.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Clark Propst
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2021 6:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Red Owl warehouse

 

I've pretty done all I can with the grocery warehouse cars. I've found plenty of mistakes. I'm sure there was more. Please take a look at your favorite road and let me know if changes are needed? Would be nice to be able to add car classes, I know the ATSF, SP, UP used them. The PRR classes are in the ORER.
Thanks
Clark


Re: Red Owl warehouse

Schleigh Mike
 

Light bulbs were another 'back fill' commodity for reefers and, western reefers that got close to Maine might ship seed potatoes west, but, they really were a reefer item were they not.

By the way those American Olean tiles that found their way onto reefers were loaded on the somewhat obscure Pittsburg Shawmut & Northern RR until April of 1947 and then by the Pennsylvania that took over switching the Olean portion that survived  the road's closing.

Mike Schleigh, Grove City in western Penna.

On Friday, February 26, 2021, 06:25:08 PM EST, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:


On Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 02:08 PM, np328 wrote:
Other than bicycles, I have paperwork showing cigarettes, matches, tires, (yes tires) magazines and books were a big back-haul commodity as they were clean...

You can add ceramic tile to that list, which was typically shipped boxed to prevent damage, and the boxes were small enough (it's heavy!) to easily hand truck out through the narrow door. There was a distribution warehouse for American Olean tile in the neighborhood I grew up in, that received as many reefers as boxcars.

Dennis Storzek


Re: riveted PS-1's? (was Model Box Car End ID)

Tim O'Connor
 


That's really weird, Tony - I never knew that! Evidently Pullman finally caved (at least by 1959) and
allowed gussets to be applied to welded cars too! :-D



On 2/26/2021 7:47 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:

Chew on this - most PS-1 ends after 1950 had welded mid-seams. But NOT all of them. The
Southern Pacific riveted B-50-37 "PS-1" box cars built in 1955 also had riveted mid-seams on
their ends. 

SP piggybacked onto a C&O order for riveted 50-foot double-door box cars with PS-1 ends and underframes. Each road got 200 cars. The cars were built to C&O specs (Class B-34) and SP got the same cars. One reason for this was that SP wanted gussets at the lower door opening corners, and P-S would not modify the "standard" PS-1 body. But since the riveted cars were not "standard," the gussets could be specified. (See my box car book in the _SP Freight Cars_ series, p. 379). 

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: L&N Woodrack -- 3

George Courtney
 

Great model.  It raised a question in my mind.  Did railroads offer shorter cars, of all types, to customers to help out smaller operations and keep them away from trucks?  Or was it a matter of the economics of the times?  For example, following the Depression, the shorter cars disappeared slowly?  Just curious.

George Courtney


Re: riveted PS-1's? (was Model Box Car End ID)

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Chew on this - most PS-1 ends after 1950 had welded mid-seams. But NOT all of them. The
Southern Pacific riveted B-50-37 "PS-1" box cars built in 1955 also had riveted mid-seams on
their ends. 

SP piggybacked onto a C&O order for riveted 50-foot double-door box cars with PS-1 ends and underframes. Each road got 200 cars. The cars were built to C&O specs (Class B-34) and SP got the same cars. One reason for this was that SP wanted gussets at the lower door opening corners, and P-S would not modify the "standard" PS-1 body. But since the riveted cars were not "standard," the gussets could be specified. (See my box car book in the _SP Freight Cars_ series, p. 379). 

Tony Thompson




Re: Red Owl warehouse

Clark Propst
 

I've pretty done all I can with the grocery warehouse cars. I've found plenty of mistakes. I'm sure there was more. Please take a look at your favorite road and let me know if changes are needed? Would be nice to be able to add car classes, I know the ATSF, SP, UP used them. The PRR classes are in the ORER.
Thanks
Clark

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