Date   

Re: Door opening size on an LV 8500 series Automobile box

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I think the two doors are in fact the same width, in part because of the simplification of inventory for the railroads (Not just the LV).  “Oh, yeah, we need to get more 7’-6” doors, plenty of 8’ doors on hand but we need the narrower doors too , , ,”

 

I doubt that.

 

What Steve discovered below might have something to do with the entire door opening dimension question.  Are you measuring the NET door opening, or the opening in the steel side of the car?

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve and Barb Hile
Sent: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 6:11 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Door opening size on an LV 8500 series Autombile box

 

Bud,

 

I still not convinced that the left hand door isn’t the same width as the main/right hand door.  Nevertheless, the doors are somewhat wider than the clear opening in order to completely cover the opening.

 

And something that I hadn’t known before is shown in this figure from the 1940 CBC

 

 

What surprised me was the center beam that moves with the left hand door and, essentially restricts the clear opening by about 6”.

 

To answer your overall question, I doubt that anyone would flinch is you used two 8 foot doors to cover the opening.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bud Rindfleisch
Sent: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 7:52 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Door opening size on an LV 8500 series Autombile box

 

Thanks for all the information on the LV 50' double door auto boxes. If that door opening is15' and the doors are what appears to be equal width, my next question is....was there a 7'6" wide Youngstown door? 
     Bud Rindfleisch


Garage sale

Clark Propst
 

The estate sale of Mike Moore (he attended RPM meets with me) at the time and location below. 
 
April 17 from 9:30 to 4 at 1806 Brookside Cir, Albert Lea, MN 56007
 
The collection is all top notch models from companies like Tangent, Exactrail, Intermountain, Red Caboose, P2K, Athearn Genesis, etc. Hundreds of models in the 50-70s era. HO scale
 
Please tell anyone interested that’s within driving distance.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Photo: Cement Plant Equipment Load

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Cement Plant Equipment Load

A photo from the University of Texas-Arlington Archives:

https://library.uta.edu/digitalgallery/img/20091764

Click on the photo twice to fully enlarge it.

Circa 1947.

Description: “Trinity Portland Cement Train. Four men are standing next to a train car with a large pipe. A series of cars with the similar pipes go into the distance on railroad tracks.”

Appears to be a rotary kiln.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Wabash Outside Braced Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Wabash Outside Braced Boxcar

A photo from the University of Texas-Arlington Archives:

https://library.uta.edu/digitalgallery/img/20091771

Click on the photo twice to fully enlarge it.

Circa 1947. Car number is not apparent.

A B&O wagon-top boxcar also is shown.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Tichy wheel car

Lloyd Keyser
 

You are right Dennis. Friction bearing surfaces were protected from weather until used at the RIP with a liquid applied black coating (can't remember the name of it) applied after new wheels were applied to the axles. This was removed before installing in the truck frame. This was obviously not necessary when shipped  with a roller bearing applied. Lloyd Keyser 

On Wed, Mar 31, 2021 at 9:20 AM Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:
On Wed, Mar 31, 2021 at 04:29 AM, Ray Hutchison wrote:
It would seem that most layouts/maintenance yards should have one or more of these.
Actually, wheel cars tended to congregate around the wheel shop where turning and mounting wheels was done. The cars would more or less run a regularly scheduled route, bringing new and reconditioned wheels out to locations with RIP tracks and bringing their old wheels back for reconditioning or scrapping. Wheels weren't typically stored on the car.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Tichy wheel car

Lester Breuer
 

Tony the truck wheel photos wonderful.  Thanks for sharing.
Lester Breuer


NJI&I to Wabash at Pine - Part 3

Gary Roe
 

Here is another installment of "Daily Interchange Report of Cars" from the NJI&I to the Wabash at Pine in 1953.  The following list is dated 06May53.  All cars originated at South Bend.  I am showing Initials, Number, Destination, Contents.

gary roe
quincy, illinois

The first group of cars were left between 10A and noon for pick up by Westbound Train 89, due at Pine around 9:30A on 07May.

CWC   9622    Chicago IL          Empty
GN    51347   Chicago IL          Empty
SOO   44130   Chicago IL          Empty
GN    20550   Chicago IL          Empty
NJII  78047   Mahoney KS          Paper Boxes

This group of cars were left between 10A and midnight for pick up by Eastbound Mixed Passenger Train 52, due at Pine at 8:04A on 07May.

L&N   77487   New Paris IN        Empty
L&N   181645  New Paris IN        Empty
Sou   119059  Wolcottville IN     Empty

This group of cars were left between 11P and midnight for pick up by Westbound Mixed Passenger Train 51, due at Pine at 11:53A on 08May.

NLLX  3769    Whiting IN          Empty
IC    83903   Indiana Harbor IN   Scrap
SP    60755   North Liberty IN    Empty
ATSF  144000  North Liberty IN    Empty

The Wabash did not get much Line Haul for the last 2 cars.  North Liberty is only 5.5 miles from Pine.


Re: Tichy wheel car

Dennis Storzek
 

On Tue, Mar 30, 2021 at 11:36 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
If you look carefully at the picture, the truck springs have been removed and the sideframes shifted outward to clear the axle ends.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Tichy wheel car

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Mar 31, 2021 at 04:29 AM, Ray Hutchison wrote:
It would seem that most layouts/maintenance yards should have one or more of these.
Actually, wheel cars tended to congregate around the wheel shop where turning and mounting wheels was done. The cars would more or less run a regularly scheduled route, bringing new and reconditioned wheels out to locations with RIP tracks and bringing their old wheels back for reconditioning or scrapping. Wheels weren't typically stored on the car.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Buckeye box car ends?

ed_mines
 

That's an expensive car to cut up. It's a very nice car on it's own. Every so often you'll find one for sale on ebay.
Redball had both plastic and metal versions of a Buckeye end. I don't know if that's exactly the one you need.
Years ago Roller Bearing sold an epoxy version of a Buckeye end. 
Sunshine had a kit for the exact car you want to model.
Ed Mines
 


Re: Tichy wheel car

Ray Hutchison
 

Thank you for the comments/photographs of the model and prototype!  It would seem that most layouts/maintenance yards should have one or more of these.  Comments raise the interesting question of how to simulate the gunk in the wheel faces, etc... the Tichy model has wheels in reddish plastic, similar (I think) to what is shown in Lee's model/photograph.  The ribbed wheels are appropriate for my time-period, but surprised that they do not offer option for later/more recent years.

Ray Hutchison
Green Bay WI


Re: Tichy wheel car

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Webster wrote:

  In the picture you cannot remove an axle with the side frames still on the bolster. The truck has to be completely disassembled. You would also need some kind of crane.

In the 1920s and 1930s (the photo below is from May 1930) things were even simpler. This image is from PFE's Nampa Shop, and is one of a long series showing MANY steps in replacing wheel sets. All photos have a single workman, no crane, just a jack for raising the car body

Tony Thompson





Re: Tichy wheel car

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Webster wrote:

  In the picture you cannot remove an axle with the side frames still on the bolster. The truck has to be completely disassembled. You would also need some kind of crane.

I wouldn't dispute your account, but will just append two photos of the prototype in the 1950s, that I used for modeling. I can supply more if anyone wishes. 

Tony Thompson




Re: Tichy wheel car

fire5506
 

On Tue, Mar 30, 2021 at 04:14 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Bruce Smith wrote:
If they are new wheelsets, somebody screwed up and didn't protect the axle bearing surfaces 😉
    True, assuming they were otherwise ready for service. But often the machining of the bearing surfaces (and sometimes the wheel tread (to make sure contour was right) would be done somewhere other than the wheel foundry.
    I discussed all this, and showed prototype photos, in my article on trucks and wheels in the _Model Railroad Hobbyist_ issue for September 2016. The scene on my layout, of workmen changing out wheelsets in a truck, has both shiny and rusty wheel treads, but all journal surfaces are shiny. See below.

Tony Thompson
 

 I used to work on cars with Babbitt bearing trucks when we still had them. They were a job to replace and also to repack. 

 The journal area of the wheel sets would not be shiny metal until it is clean just prior to installing them. They are coated with a rust inhibitor. We had pans that you put under the journal to catch the mineral spirits used to clean the rust inhibitor off. You also had to look for rust and dings in the journal and use very fine sand paper to remove them.

 The wheels come from the foundry separate from the axles. They are machined to fit the axles at a wheel shop and then pressed on the axles. Back in this groups time span it would be a railroad wheel shop. 
If the wheels were new wheels they would be rusted, if turned then they would have shiny treads until they sat long enough to rust. So on a wheel car coming from a wheel shop might have both rusted tread and shiny treads, but they would be the same on each axle. 
  In the picture you cannot remove an axle with the side frames still on the bolster. The truck has to be completely disassembled. You would also need some kind of crane.
 You pick the bolster up to the top of the side frames, then remove all the springs. Lower the bolster down on to some blocking holding it up so that the top of it is about at the top of the wide spot in the side frame. Then you lift the side frame enough to take the wedge and brass(bearing) out. now you slide the side frame off. Now do the same to the other side frame. Remove the seals. Clean the well out of dirt, oil and water. install new seals. swap out what wheel or wheels are being replaced. reverse the procedure to put it back together. After being put back together install new oiled packing and fill well with journal oil.

Richard Webster


F/S REA logo Peel and Stick signs

John Mateyko
 
Edited






Ten REA logo signs on two sheets for $10.  Shown next to a factory stamped sign on a Lionel milk car and on a modified Weaver box car.
John Mateyko


Re: Tichy wheel car

Steve SANDIFER
 

These are contemporary photos, but most color ones are newer than this group.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jerry Michels
Sent: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 1:09 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tichy wheel car

 

The wheels are probably a little too uniformly rusty, but new wheels can get rusty if they have set around for a while.  If they are new, then the gunk is out.  If they are older sets, perhaps reused by the wreck crew, they could be gunky. Jerry Michels


Re: Door opening size on an LV 8500 series Autombile box

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Bud,

 

I still not convinced that the left hand door isn’t the same width as the main/right hand door.  Nevertheless, the doors are somewhat wider than the clear opening in order to completely cover the opening.

 

And something that I hadn’t known before is shown in this figure from the 1940 CBC

 

 

What surprised me was the center beam that moves with the left hand door and, essentially restricts the clear opening by about 6”.

 

To answer your overall question, I doubt that anyone would flinch is you used two 8 foot doors to cover the opening.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bud Rindfleisch
Sent: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 7:52 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Door opening size on an LV 8500 series Autombile box

 

Thanks for all the information on the LV 50' double door auto boxes. If that door opening is15' and the doors are what appears to be equal width, my next question is....was there a 7'6" wide Youngstown door? 
     Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Photo: Unloading Grain From A Boxcar

akerboomk
 

RE: Chains

I almost missed the chains are attached to a ?strap? (at least the one the guy on the left is using is), which then (eventually) is attached to a winch of some sort

I would assume the other one is also attached, but the “strap” is below the floor height and is therefore hidden from view


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: Tichy wheel car

Tony Thompson
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

If they are new wheelsets, somebody screwed up and didn't protect the axle bearing surfaces 😉

    True, assuming they were otherwise ready for service. But often the machining of the bearing surfaces (and sometimes the wheel tread (to make sure contour was right) would be done somewhere other than the wheel foundry.
    I discussed all this, and showed prototype photos, in my article on trucks and wheels in the _Model Railroad Hobbyist_ issue for September 2016. The scene on my layout, of workmen changing out wheelsets in a truck, has both shiny and rusty wheel treads, but all journal surfaces are shiny. See below.

Tony Thompson




Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Tichy wheel car

Bruce Smith
 

Tony,

If they are new wheelsets, somebody screwed up and didn't protect the axle bearing surfaces 😉

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tony Thompson <tony@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 1:32 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Tichy wheel car
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Dave Parker wrote:

I am curious as to where these wheelsets are coming from, and going to, given how uniformly rusty they are.  

I would assume new wheels, that have sat awhile before shipping. Otherwise, if used wheels,  treads would be shiny and wheel faces SERIOUSLY dirty.

Tony Thompson



5481 - 5500 of 188504