Date   

Re: Tichy wheel car

Ed Mims
 

I can assure you that Richard Webster's description of a wheel change in a railroad shop or car repair track is accurate. You can not remove or apply a solid bearing wheel set without first removing one side frame from its position in the truck bolster to provide space for the axle to be positioned (or removed) in an integral journal box type side frame. Trucks with separable journal boxes, such as Andrews trucks, are much easier. The journal boxes can be removed along with the axle being changed out whiteout disturbing the bolster. The wheel set can be replaced with the journal boxes installed on the axle and the journal boxes re-bolted to the side frames.

All repair track "truck stations" that I am familiar with were equipped with a means to lift the heavy truck parts, i.e. jib cranes or other devices. 

Ed Mims


Re: NJI&I to Wabash at Pine - Part 3

ron christensen
 

A couple of pictures of cars the 40 foot NJI&I boxcar was in Rantoul IL. in the 1960s
The Wabash 49114 is in North Judson IN. The stencil reads "when empty return to NJI&I RR South Bend Ind"
Ron Christensen


Gene Deimling blog Re: 1/4” Scale Mid-Century Composite Boxcar

Ray Hutchison
 

Gene Deimling blog:

https://myp48.wordpress.com/


Re: Tichy wheel car

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Webster wrote:

Unless that one man is superman, he couldn't lift those side frames or wheels by himself let alone line everything up. I will grant you there is no crane, but those wheels are close to 2000 lbs. so there is no way one man will get the old ones off that track and new ones back on it.

As experienced riggers and workmen will tell you, when there's no crane, you use the tools the Egyptians built the pyramids with: wedges, levers and rollers. 
     There is a video from the SP wheel shop at Sacramento, with single  men levering wheels up onto their edges and "wheeling" them, by hand, to where they needed to go, no cranes. Included is two men rolling a wheelset off the rails (at a paved crossing) and moving it at 90 degrees to the original direction. Nothing is lifted; sometimes small jacks are used to raise parts,even car bodies.
     Obviously these things were strenuous and many were dangerous. But that IS how it was often done in those days.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Unloading Grain From A Boxcar

Douglas Harding
 

Here is the best I can offer. All have a small pulley outside the car door, which routes the pulling cable.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Philip Dove
Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2021 9:33 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain From A Boxcar

 

Does anyone have a picture of the other end of the winch equipment?

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com

 


Re: Tichy wheel car

fire5506
 

On Wed, Mar 31, 2021 at 02:44 AM, Tony Thompson wrote:
 
In the 1920s and 1930s (the photo below is from May 1930) things were even simpler. This image is from PFE's Nampa Shop, and is one of a long series showing MANY steps in replacing wheel sets. All photos have a single workman, no crane, just a jack for raising the car body
 

 
Unless that one man is superman, he couldn't lift those side frames or wheels by himself let alone line everything up. I will grant you there is no crane, but those wheels are close to 2000 lbs. so there is no way one man will get the old ones off that track and new ones back on it.

Richard Webster


Re: Photo: Wabash Outside Braced Boxcar

Scott
 

Cool photo.  I need to model a boxcar with the door open.

Scott McDonald 


Re: Tichy wheel car

fire5506
 

The top photo the truck is either already back together or it's being taken apart. The bottom photo is a disability waiting to happen with both wheel setout out of the truck and the side frames barely hanging in there. I blew the pictures up to look at them.
Not everyone worked or was allowed to work safely back then.

Richard Webster


Re: Photo: Unloading Grain From A Boxcar

Philip Dove
 

Does anyone have a picture of the other end of the winch equipment?

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: 1/4” Scale Mid-Century Composite Boxcar

Rich C
 

Simply outstanding, Gene! I follow your blog quite regularly.

Rich Christie


Re: 1/4” Scale Mid-Century Composite Boxcar

Guy Wilber
 

Gene wrote:

“My scratch building project to create a replica of the Northern Pacific 9480 boxcar series is done.

I was fortunate enough to have Lee Turner paint and weather the car. He used a custom Rick Leach decal set to finish the car off.”

Trifecta! Three true craftsman and the combined end result is stunning!

Kindest Regards,

Guy Wilber


Re: 1/4” Scale Mid-Century Composite Boxcar

gtws00
 

That is a beautiful looking model.
Thanks for sharing
George Toman


Re: Photo: Wabash Outside Braced Boxcar

mopacfirst
 

I'll be by there next week, those vertical cylinder structures (grain?) look very familiar.  I did just realize that you can see the Tarrant County courthouse in this photo, which you can't do now because of all the buildings in the way.  It's easily a full mile from this locale to there.

Interesting that there is a B&O wagon-top box in this photo also.  One-half of one sat in this yard for years in the sixties-seventies as a building.  

Ron Merrick


Re: Tichy wheel car

mopacfirst
 

There was one called Japanese black.  Normally it came off with mineral spirits, but it was eventually reformulated with something that was almost impervious to solvents and almost needed to be taken off with a grinder.  Fine for buttweld ends of piping, but not so good for machined surfaces.

Ron Merrick


Re: Tichy wheel car

Tom Palmer
 

Hi Lloyd,

                The common rust inhibitor used for decades was Cosmoline. Not sure if it is still in use today.

 

Regards,

            Tom Palmer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lloyd Keyser
Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2021 11:25 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tichy wheel car

 

You are right Dennis. Friction bearing surfaces were protected from weather until used at the RIP with a liquid applied black coating (can't remember the name of it) applied after new wheels were applied to the axles. This was removed before installing in the truck frame. This was obviously not necessary when shipped  with a roller bearing applied. Lloyd Keyser 

 

On Wed, Mar 31, 2021 at 9:20 AM Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Wed, Mar 31, 2021 at 04:29 AM, Ray Hutchison wrote:

It would seem that most layouts/maintenance yards should have one or more of these.

Actually, wheel cars tended to congregate around the wheel shop where turning and mounting wheels was done. The cars would more or less run a regularly scheduled route, bringing new and reconditioned wheels out to locations with RIP tracks and bringing their old wheels back for reconditioning or scrapping. Wheels weren't typically stored on the car.

Dennis Storzek


Re: 1/4" Scale Mid-Century Composite Boxcar

Schuyler Larrabee
 

In the future, historians and modelers will be
exchanging speculation about the exact location of
this marvelous photograph of these two prototype
cars. They will be eternally frustrated by this.

Gene, your modeling is beyond compare.

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
<main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Deimling
Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2021 2:52 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] 1/4" Scale Mid-Century
Composite Boxcar

My scratch building project to create a replica of
the Northern Pacific 9480 boxcar series is done.
I built the car from Evergreen styrene except for
the ends salvaged off an Intermountain AAR boxcar.
I was fortunate enough to have Lee Turner paint
and weather the car. He used a custom Rick Leach
decal set to finish the car off.

Gene Deimling


Re: Photo: Cement Plant Equipment Load

Clark Propst
 

Yes, possibly kiln shell sections

Clark Propst


Re: 1/4” Scale Mid-Century Composite Boxcar

Tony Thompson
 

Marvelous modeling -- shows what can be done in O scale. Good one, Gene!

Tony Thompson
tony@signaturepress.com


Re: 1/4” Scale Mid-Century Composite Boxcar

James Brewer
 

Beautiful work Gene!

Jim Brewer


Re: Photo: Wabash Outside Braced Boxcar

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi List members,
 
I believe there is a PRR class R50b express reefer immediately to the right of locomotive 1955, under the vertical cylinder structures. These cars got around!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Gary Roe
Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2021 1:22 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Wabash Outside Braced Boxcar

Bob,

Wabash car is 76000 series.  Can't make out last 3 digits.

Photo taken at Fort Worth ATSF Station, in background to left.

gary roe
quincy, illinois


On Wednesday, March 31, 2021, 11:34:04 AM CDT, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: Wabash Outside Braced Boxcar

A photo from the University of Texas-Arlington Archives:

https://library.uta.edu/digitalgallery/img/20091771

Click on the photo twice to fully enlarge it.

Circa 1947. Car number is not apparent.

A B&O wagon-top boxcar also is shown.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

5581 - 5600 of 188631