Date   

Photos: Reading Gondolas

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: Reading Gondolas

A photo from the Hagley Digital Archives:

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_0225

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

One car is 29035.

A second photo of 28407

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_0224

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: PRR Gondolas

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Gondolas

A photo from the Hagley Digital Archives:

https://digital.hagley.org/1986268_0288

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: GN Boxcar

Bruce Smith
 

Phillip,

You're a few decades too late. The pallet as we know it, along with the fork-lift, were invented in the 1920s. By 1925, the pallet included bottom planks.
Palletized material was part of the Allied logistics stragegy in WWII.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Philip Dove <philipdove22@...>
Sent: Tuesday, April 20, 2021 10:20 AM
To: John Barry <northbaylines@...>; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] GN Boxcar
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
I don't know about the Uniforms, but do the pallets or skids by the car date things. I thought pallets came with fork lift trucks and Iso containers after the second World War? 

Sent from my Huawei phone


-------- Original message --------
From: John Barry <northbaylines@...>
Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2021, 22:28
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GN Boxcar
Garth,

I have to agree with you and Brian on the fellow in khakis.  The MP armband is a dead giveaway.  Joint Army-Navy or Army-CG patrols were often used in WWII.  It helped defuse things when busting up brawls as the joint groups weren't seen as taking sides the way a strictly SP or MP detail could be by brawlers from the opposite service.  There's also documentation that joint teams were used on passenger trains during the war.  

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 






On Sunday, April 18, 2021, 04:45:59 PM EDT, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


Brian and Paul,

Since the photo was found at the bottom of a Coast Guard file cabinet, I tend to agree with Brian. Also consider that the Coast Guard was heavily involved in both port safety and port security during WWII.

Both officers and enlisted men wore the same uniforms as the Navy, except for insignia and sometimes the "Donald Duck" hat for junior enlisteds (but also the Navy "Dixie Cup", you see in the photo). All I can really tell you about the SP facing the camera is that he is a second class, though his specialty is unclear. Chief Petty Officers and officers usually wore Navy khakis.

Now that I have your attention, I will share a story about legendary Coast Guard Captain Higby (later promoted to Admiral upon his retirement). He was, IIRC, head of port security in Long Beach/Los Angeles during WWII. Higby could be a terror. Once he was inspecting a bridge with one of his subordinates who was responsible for that structure. Sitting right on the bridge was a box clearly marked as dynamite. Higby pointed out the box with great indignation, then drew his .45 and put a bullet right through the box. His subordinate officer almost fainted. The box was, of course, empty and had been placed there by Captain Higby just to make a point. 

I knew Admiral Higby slightly. He used to wander around the District Office in Long Beach in his very senior years (like 85 or something). He often used the restroom outside my office to change into swimming trunks and a bathrobe before going down to the shore for a dip. He was quite a character.

Now let's get back to boxcars.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sun, Apr 18, 2021 at 12:20 PM Paul Koehler <koehlers@...> wrote:

Brian:

 

Look again, I believe that’s two Coast Guard SP’s and a Coast Guard Officer.

 

Paul; C. Koehler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of BRIAN PAUL EHNI
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 6:45 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GN Boxcar

 

And Army MP (Military Police) and two Navy SPs (Shore Police) by the look of it.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, April 18, 2021 at 6:43 AM
To: realSTMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] GN Boxcar

 

Friends,

 

While scanning my prints I came upon this interesting photo of a GN boxcar. I found the faded original in a file when I was assigned to the Coast Guard District 11 headquarters in Long Beach. I presume that these are Coast Guardsmen, the photo is from the Los Angeles harbor area, and was taken during WWII.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆


Photo: DuPont Tank Cars (1940)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: DuPont Tank Cars (1940)

A photo from the Hagley Digital Archives:

https://digital.hagley.org/1972341_0339

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

I wonder if a plastic model manufacture could figure out how to simulate the band going over the top rivet row as seen on car #317 without resorting to a separate piece for the band?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photos: Boxcar Cleaning Equipment

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: Boxcar Cleaning Equipment

A photo from the Hagley Digital Archives:

https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_22175

https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_22173

Click on the photos to enlarge them.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: GN Boxcar

Philip Dove
 

I don't know about the Uniforms, but do the pallets or skids by the car date things. I thought pallets came with fork lift trucks and Iso containers after the second World War? 

Sent from my Huawei phone


-------- Original message --------
From: John Barry <northbaylines@...>
Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2021, 22:28
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GN Boxcar
Garth,

I have to agree with you and Brian on the fellow in khakis.  The MP armband is a dead giveaway.  Joint Army-Navy or Army-CG patrols were often used in WWII.  It helped defuse things when busting up brawls as the joint groups weren't seen as taking sides the way a strictly SP or MP detail could be by brawlers from the opposite service.  There's also documentation that joint teams were used on passenger trains during the war.  

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 






On Sunday, April 18, 2021, 04:45:59 PM EDT, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


Brian and Paul,

Since the photo was found at the bottom of a Coast Guard file cabinet, I tend to agree with Brian. Also consider that the Coast Guard was heavily involved in both port safety and port security during WWII.

Both officers and enlisted men wore the same uniforms as the Navy, except for insignia and sometimes the "Donald Duck" hat for junior enlisteds (but also the Navy "Dixie Cup", you see in the photo). All I can really tell you about the SP facing the camera is that he is a second class, though his specialty is unclear. Chief Petty Officers and officers usually wore Navy khakis.

Now that I have your attention, I will share a story about legendary Coast Guard Captain Higby (later promoted to Admiral upon his retirement). He was, IIRC, head of port security in Long Beach/Los Angeles during WWII. Higby could be a terror. Once he was inspecting a bridge with one of his subordinates who was responsible for that structure. Sitting right on the bridge was a box clearly marked as dynamite. Higby pointed out the box with great indignation, then drew his .45 and put a bullet right through the box. His subordinate officer almost fainted. The box was, of course, empty and had been placed there by Captain Higby just to make a point. 

I knew Admiral Higby slightly. He used to wander around the District Office in Long Beach in his very senior years (like 85 or something). He often used the restroom outside my office to change into swimming trunks and a bathrobe before going down to the shore for a dip. He was quite a character.

Now let's get back to boxcars.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sun, Apr 18, 2021 at 12:20 PM Paul Koehler <koehlers@...> wrote:

Brian:

 

Look again, I believe that’s two Coast Guard SP’s and a Coast Guard Officer.

 

Paul; C. Koehler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of BRIAN PAUL EHNI
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 6:45 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GN Boxcar

 

And Army MP (Military Police) and two Navy SPs (Shore Police) by the look of it.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, April 18, 2021 at 6:43 AM
To: realSTMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] GN Boxcar

 

Friends,

 

While scanning my prints I came upon this interesting photo of a GN boxcar. I found the faded original in a file when I was assigned to the Coast Guard District 11 headquarters in Long Beach. I presume that these are Coast Guardsmen, the photo is from the Los Angeles harbor area, and was taken during WWII.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆


B&O Washington D.C. Freight Terminal 1956

kevinhlafferty
 

An interesting array of box, reefer and early TOFC cars/trailers; even an increased height ATSF BX-11 or -12.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/51040509441/


Re: Photo: Interstate Gondola 10144 (1930)

Philip Dove
 

I never thought of sugar beet, but now you say it l agree they almost certainly are sugar beets. 

Sent from my Huawei phone


-------- Original message --------
From: Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...>
Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2021, 00:28
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Interstate Gondola 10144 (1930)

The load looks like sugar beets to me. It is quite possible the car got offline and was “borrowed” during the beet season. Ohio raised a lot of sugar beets, so the car did not have to travel too far off line.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Boxcar For Automobile Roofs

Benjamin Hom
 

Elden Gatwood asked:
"Hard question, I know:  Anyone have any idea what car company was receiving these roofs? Model?"

While rail enthusiast know Budd for its railroad work, much of the company's business was as an automotive supplier.  This company history indicates some possible customers:





Welded reefer?

Richard Townsend
 

My off the wall question for today was triggered by a discussion with a friend. Were there any 40' steam era reefers with welded rather than riveted sides? We could not think of any.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Boxcar For Automobile Roofs

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

Hard question, I know:  Anyone have any idea what car company was receiving these roofs?

 

Model?

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, April 17, 2021 10:07 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: Boxcar For Automobile Roofs

 

Photo: Boxcar For Automobile Roofs

A photo from the Hagley Digital Archives:

https://digital.hagley.org/1999228_0021

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] High load - "NEED SPECIAL HANDLING?" NKP advertizing

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Claus, Group;

 

I dug through my pics in depth, and could not locate this car, but I think it is not NKP (hence the airbrushed out lettering), but another road (like Erie or NYC maybe) that had the even spaced axle six-wheel trucks, that cut-out above the trucks, and that GSC cast body with ribs on the transition from lower deck to upper decks.

 

Can anyone help?

 

Thanks!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 6:09 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] High load - "NEED SPECIAL HANDLING?" NKP advertizing

 

Hi List Members,

 

High load - "NEED SPECIAL HANDLING?" NKP advertizing

 

Not clear whose depressed center flat that is.

 

 

More info below...

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 377243 G31E (1956)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

This photo was taken while PRR was in the midst of a big conversion of G31E from general service gons to dedicated “skid & cover” cars for coiled steel shipment.

 

This is one of a large group converted in 1956 in PRR shops, for use in the steel industry.  Steel manufacturers were clamoring for these cars, and PRR was converting as fast as they could.

 

The “tell” on what group is the wire bale lifting arrangement and lack of racking diagonals on the covers.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 12:13 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 377243 G31E (1956)

 

Photo: PRR Gondola 377243 G31E (1956)

A photo from the Hagley Digital Archives:

https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_21110

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Coiled steel covers.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


ADMIN - Funny pronunciation of "moderate jail"

Aley, Jeff A
 

Hi Folks,

 

               Let us now return to the discussion of Steam-Era Freight Cars.  Otherwise, you might find yourself in Moderate Jail (“MOD-er-8” not “MOD-er-ut”).

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff Aley,

Deputy Moderator, RealSTMFC

 

 

 


Re: [Funny names and pronounciationss

Dave Lawler
 

How about LYE-ma, Ohio, home of the famous locomotive works, and LEE-ma, Peru.
Dave Lawler


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR G25, X40 and F37

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

Just to add to what Ben said, the X40 were part of the “lightweight” fad taking place at the time.

 

The thinking was that reduction of dead weight in a car, particularly in service like LCL, could be lowered, cost savings.

 

Unfortunately, with the failure of dedicated LCL, these cars were cascaded into other service, resulting in them being overloaded sometimes.

 

They did not hold up well in general service, and other less than robust car classes also suffered.

 

PRR’s answer much after the fact was to only build box cars with much-reinforced side sills, including sometimes door gussets, either on rebuilds or as new.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Tuesday, April 20, 2021 8:57 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR G25, X40 and F37

 

Ron Merrick wrote:

"Hope somebody will humor me, but I'm interested in the X40 cars despite the fact that I'll never build a model of one, one reason being that I doubt that one of them ever visited my obscure secondary main line in Kansas.  I believe the X40c was the fire engine delivery car, which has been discussed here several times."

 

While the single Class X40C car was a 60 ft non-rack equipped automobile boxcar with end doors that could have been used for delivering fire engines, it wasn't necessarily dedicated in that service, so could be used for any other lading requiring an end door automobile boxcar.

 

Regarding the dedicated car for American LaFrance, you're probably thinking about the Class X30 boxcar.

 

 

"But I'd be curious as to what the others were intended for, other than pushing the envelope on freight car design.  I see by the prr.railfan.net site that they had a fairly long life,  but since only 110 were ever built, they may have been an evolutionary dead end."

 

They were used in automobile service, with a few equipped for LCL service  - a check of the notes section of the ORER would indicate which ones were equipped with racks for specific parts and other service.

 

 

Ben Hom


Re: PRR G25, X40 and F37

Benjamin Hom
 

Ron Merrick wrote:
"Hope somebody will humor me, but I'm interested in the X40 cars despite the fact that I'll never build a model of one, one reason being that I doubt that one of them ever visited my obscure secondary main line in Kansas.  I believe the X40c was the fire engine delivery car, which has been discussed here several times."

While the single Class X40C car was a 60 ft non-rack equipped automobile boxcar with end doors that could have been used for delivering fire engines, it wasn't necessarily dedicated in that service, so could be used for any other lading requiring an end door automobile boxcar.

Regarding the dedicated car for American LaFrance, you're probably thinking about the Class X30 boxcar.


"But I'd be curious as to what the others were intended for, other than pushing the envelope on freight car design.  I see by the prr.railfan.net site that they had a fairly long life,  but since only 110 were ever built, they may have been an evolutionary dead end."

They were used in automobile service, with a few equipped for LCL service  - a check of the notes section of the ORER would indicate which ones were equipped with racks for specific parts and other service.


Ben Hom


Re: PRR G25, X40 and F37

mopacfirst
 

Hope somebody will humor me, but I'm interested in the X40 cars despite the fact that I'll never build a model of one, one reason being that I doubt that one of them ever visited my obscure secondary main line in Kansas.  I believe the X40c was the fire engine delivery car, which has been discussed here several times.  But I'd be curious as to what the others were intended for, other than pushing the envelope on freight car design.  I see by the prr.railfan.net site that they had a fairly long life,  but since only 110 were ever built, they may have been an evolutionary dead end.

I did recently pick up a Sunshine X41 (basically the same car, but 50'), which would perhaps be more likely to have made it out my way.

Ron Merrick


Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] PRR G25, X40 and F37

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

During WWII, the F37 was used to carry US Nave 40 mm bofors anti-aircraft gun mounts. I have yet to find a photo (or loading diagram) of this load on one of these well-flats, so if any of you might have any information on how these guns were loaded, I'd love to see it1

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: [Funny names and pronounciationss

George Kristy
 

Funny name for this thread: 'Moderator Must Be Sleeping'

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