Date   

Re: Photo: Unloading Can Stock (1948)

Jim Betz
 
Edited

Hi all,
  When I was in H.S. I worked in a salmon cannery.  Our cans all came to us
fully made up (no lid) in large cardboard boxes of perhaps 1000 cans at a
time.  The box was the size of a pallet on the bottom and about 4 feet tall.
I worked in the warehouse crew and the cans came in box cars, were
off loaded by driving a fork lift into the car and picking them up.  They
were stacked 2 'cases' tall in the box car with the pallet already under
them and strapped to the pallet with two 3/4" wide metal straps.  From
the warehouse they went up to the 2nd story (lifted up by fork lift) and
were stored in "the can loft" which was over the canning lines.  The
box straps were cut off and the top opened up and they were put into
a sort of hopper/feeder that the cans rolled out of and down to the
canning machines by gravity.  The canning machines 'took' one can
at a time from the gravity line and put it in front of a ram where the
salmon was rammed into it (after having been cut to length).  The
ram went back and forth ... bang, bang, bang ... several times a
minute (perhaps once a second) and every time it took a can the
cans in the gravity line would advance.
  The lids were shipped in the same box cars with the cans and
were in boxes of several hundred at a time - perhaps one box of
lids held the number needed for one box of empty cans?  The 
lids were also put on the cans by machine - between the canning
machine with the ram and the lidding machine was a line of 
workers (all women - then) that trimmed up the weight of the
can to a perfect pound/half pound/quarter pound by adding a
bit or two of salmon.
  After the lids were put on and sealed the cans were stacked on
steel racks (think 'trays') and the trays were stacked up on a
small wheeled dolly (think RR wheels) that was pushed by hand
to the retort where it was cooked under steam pressure for a
long time (3 or 4 hours).  Then it was brought out and sent to
the labeling line, put into cases, stacked on pallets ... and 
shipped out by rail to 'the world' (usually went East out of
Everett, Wa.).

  I also worked in another salmon cannery.  This one was in Hawk
Inlet, Alaska and it had a similar operation - the differences being
that the cans came in by ship and the entire cannery was powered
by a boiler driving a stationary steam engine driving an overhead
belt power system that had 12" (?) bents running around wheels
of approximately 18" in diameter.  You can see an overhead belt
powered system if you look for pictures of the Sierra Railroad's
roundhouse in Sonora, Ca.

  One of the symmetries of shipping to be filled cans in those
cardboard boxes is that the number of car loads of cases was
essentially identical to the number of car loads of outbound
product.

  I can't imagine the kind of operation in this picture lasted very
long before it was replaced by the boxes of cans style.  The "rails"
the guy is setting up in that picture are similar to how the cans in
the canneries moved from the can loft to the canning machines.
                                                                                  - Jim


Re: ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

vapeurchapelon
 

Paul, many thanks to you too! Nice pic of an attractive paint scheme, but as you already may have seen, Tim O'Connor sent exactly what I was looking for.
A silver SP box car like this doubtless looks very nice, but aside of the too late date for me, it seems that at least 90-95% of steam era box cars were fcr or brown, that's why I will let the model repaint as the car shown at Tims photo.
 
Many greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Samstag, 24. April 2021 um 14:54 Uhr
Von: "Paul Doggett via groups.io" <paul.doggett2472@...>
An: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions
Johannes 
 
In your period they would still be running in black, around 1955 they were repainted silver with the blocked lettering style. One for Tony Thompson to answer fully.


Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 
 
 

On 24 Apr 2021, at 13:40, vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@...> wrote:
 
Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954


Re: ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

vapeurchapelon
 

Lots of thanks, Tim! This is PERFECT! :-) The file name even says "1948-1954 style paint scheme"!
 
Many greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Samstag, 24. April 2021 um 14:53 Uhr
Von: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

This appears to be a repaint prior to the use of the large Southern Pacific roadname. See the attached.

Tim O'Connor



On 4/24/2021 8:39 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Victor Hand Photo of Erie Railroad yards in Jersey City NJ August 1957

Chris Barkan
 

Lots of interesting steam era freight cars visible in this photo.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/44611217185

It is part of the Victor Hand Collection  of EL photos at
https://railphoto-art.org/collections/victor-hand-collection/erie-lackawanna-railway/
Although not primarily focused on freight cars there are several other photos with interesting cars visible,
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Re: ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

Paul Doggett
 

Johannes 

In your period they would still be running in black, around 1955 they were repainted silver with the blocked lettering style. One for Tony Thompson to answer fully.


Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 

On 24 Apr 2021, at 13:40, vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@...> wrote:

Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954


Re: ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

Tim O'Connor
 


This appears to be a repaint prior to the use of the large Southern Pacific roadname. See the attached.

Tim O'Connor



On 4/24/2021 8:39 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Heavy duty flat on ERIE in 1953 / D&H 16155

akerboomk
 

Schuyler:

Re: “Photo with your dad” – note the 3 panel COTS which would make it post-1982?

 


--
Ken Akerboom


ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954


Re: SP steel gondola in a PRR maintenance yard in Philadelphia in 1920

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony

So this is a G-50-3, not a G-50-6? I don't recall why I thought this was a G-50-6.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/23/2021 4:26 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Claus Schlund wrote:


We get to see an SP steel gondola in a PRR maintenance yard in Philadelphia in 1920
 
The SP car number begins with 537, which makes it a Class G-50-3 car, built by Pressed Steel Car in the fall of 1913. It's a drop-bottom car, and no longer has the T-section trucks with which it was delivered. Can anyone read what is on the wood placard board on the car sides?

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: NYC Boxcar 170338

kevinhlafferty
 

I believe the CB&Q boxcar is in the Chinese red scheme and that would date it to no earlier than 3/58.

Kevin Lafferty


For Sale: DVD 2 of U.S. Railway Patents, Including Steam Era Freight Cars

Ed Hawkins
 

STMFC members,
Per request by Patrick C. Wider, now available for purchase is DVD Number 2 containing U.S. railway patents including patents applicable to steam era freight cars. Please refer to the attached PDF flyer for information and ordering DVD No. 2. Thank you.

DO NOT REPLY by email to the STMFC or to me. Send replies & questions by email to Patrick C. Wider at pwider@...

Regards,
Ed Hawkins



RPCycs for sale

Clark Propst
 

The following volumes are being offered at $25 each, plus shipping. Please contact Mike Christenson at: mrcskc95@... 

1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 21, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30

Clark Propst


Re: Heavy duty flat on ERIE in 1953

Schuyler Larrabee
 

And to be clear, my friend Ben and his dad were not photographing that flat car in the early 50s.  He believes that picture of the two of them (his dad and the car) was taken in the early 80s.  Remarkable to me is the similarity of the load in 1953 and in the early 80s.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 2:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Heavy duty flat on ERIE in 1953

 

A follow-up on this.  I circulated the model photo to my friend Ben Dibble, who send me back a prototype photo of the same car and the same load!  “Dad” is his father who was “standing next to the car for scale.”  Ben’s an excellent D&H modeler.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Edward
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 9:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Heavy duty flat on ERIE in 1953

 

The flat car itself may be from the D&H, which had direct connection to GE's Schenectady Works and also with the Erie at Binghamton.
Erie was the best road for handling oversized loads due to its generous clearances and no main line tunnels, having been originally built to 6' gauge.

I modeled this in O scale from a GE advertising photo very much like the one shown above.
The color and size of my GE stator unit made in 1989 follows one I saw at the NYSE&G Jennings NY power plant, beside the D&H right of way.
The 250 ton flat is a brass Max Gray model from 1955. The timber blocking and stator end covers were made following the reference photo. 

Ed Bommer  


Re: Photo: NYC Boxcar 170338

Steve and Barb Hile
 

What intrigued me most about this photo was the photographer cites - Clarence Woodrow Sorenson.  I only knew C W Sorenson as “Woody” when he was President of Augustana College in Rock Island in the late 60’s and early 70’s.  Apparently he was more a renaissance man than I appreciated at the time.  He was a CBS correspondent in Mexico in 1940, his PhD was in Geography, he travelled the world and authored text books in the subject.  His widow apparently donated his photo collection to the American Geographic Society which placed them with the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

 

He was a good photographer.

 

Steve Hile 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ed Hawkins
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 4:23 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: NYC Boxcar 170338

 

 



On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:24 PM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

 

The NYC boxcar bears a KC 5-57 weigh location and date stencil near the weigh data. Near the end of the bottom door track is the BLT 9-56 stencil. Additionally, the large shadow keystone emblem on the Pennsy boxcar came into use in 1954.

 

That narrows the timeframe a bit. 

 

Eric Hansmann

 

Eric, George, and Bob,

Concur with the NYC box car 5-57 reweigh stencils, however, the build date that’s difficult to read is 9-50. The NYC 170338 in question was one of 1,500 PS-1s built in Pullman-Standard lot 5965, series NYC 169000-170499, NYC Lot 798-B, built ca. 7-9/1950. The first 750 cars came with Superior 7-panel doors while the last 750 cars received Youngstown doors. 

 

In the view, the Pullman-Standard builder badge is barely visible directly under the side grab near the “A” end & therefore the car was still in original paint. Zooming the photo shows a clear demarcation just outboard of the vertical rivets connecting the “B” end to the side denoting black car cement on the end. The dark roof seam caps with sunlight coming from behind the photographer also indicate the roof received black car cement.

 

Regarding HO models, Kadee’s #4100 PS-1 body is accurate for this NYC car except for the push-pole pockets that other than 5,000 NYC PS-1s were relatively uncommon on PS-1 box cars; the short sections of steel plates welded to the side sills to which the sill steps were attached; those pesky roping staples that were reasonably common on PS-1 box cars.

 

Regarding the photo date, another car in view to help further narrow the “1934-1969 photo date" is the Burlington 40’ box car coupled behind the Santa Fe box car. While I cannot read the car number, it’s the Chinese Red scheme in which the earliest cars so-painted that I’ve come across were built in 1-58. This information along with what appears to be a deciduous tree with leaves at the far left edge gives me reason to estimate the photo taken at Bloomington, Wisconsin, was about May 1958 or later.

 

Bob - thank you for locating this photo on the UMW web site & posting to the STMFC. 

 

Regards,

Ed Hawkins


Re: Photo: Unloading Can Stock (1948)

CJ Riley <cjriley42@...>
 


I hate to nit pick but I believe they are going to unload cans, not can stock, which is the raw material for cans usually in a cup or roll.



Re: Photo: NYC Boxcar 170338

Ed Hawkins
 



On Apr 23, 2021, at 2:24 PM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

The NYC boxcar bears a KC 5-57 weigh location and date stencil near the weigh data. Near the end of the bottom door track is the BLT 9-56 stencil. Additionally, the large shadow keystone emblem on the Pennsy boxcar came into use in 1954.
 
That narrows the timeframe a bit. 
 
Eric Hansmann

Eric, George, and Bob,
Concur with the NYC box car 5-57 reweigh stencils, however, the build date that’s difficult to read is 9-50. The NYC 170338 in question was one of 1,500 PS-1s built in Pullman-Standard lot 5965, series NYC 169000-170499, NYC Lot 798-B, built ca. 7-9/1950. The first 750 cars came with Superior 7-panel doors while the last 750 cars received Youngstown doors. 

In the view, the Pullman-Standard builder badge is barely visible directly under the side grab near the “A” end & therefore the car was still in original paint. Zooming the photo shows a clear demarcation just outboard of the vertical rivets connecting the “B” end to the side denoting black car cement on the end. The dark roof seam caps with sunlight coming from behind the photographer also indicate the roof received black car cement.

Regarding HO models, Kadee’s #4100 PS-1 body is accurate for this NYC car except for the push-pole pockets that other than 5,000 NYC PS-1s were relatively uncommon on PS-1 box cars; the short sections of steel plates welded to the side sills to which the sill steps were attached; those pesky roping staples that were reasonably common on PS-1 box cars.

Regarding the photo date, another car in view to help further narrow the “1934-1969 photo date" is the Burlington 40’ box car coupled behind the Santa Fe box car. While I cannot read the car number, it’s the Chinese Red scheme in which the earliest cars so-painted that I’ve come across were built in 1-58. This information along with what appears to be a deciduous tree with leaves at the far left edge gives me reason to estimate the photo taken at Bloomington, Wisconsin, was about May 1958 or later.

Bob - thank you for locating this photo on the UMW web site & posting to the STMFC. 

Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: SP steel gondola in a PRR maintenance yard in Philadelphia in 1920

Tony Thompson
 

Claus Schlund wrote:

We get to see an SP steel gondola in a PRR maintenance yard in Philadelphia in 1920
 

The SP car number begins with 537, which makes it a Class G-50-3 car, built by Pressed Steel Car in the fall of 1913. It's a drop-bottom car, and no longer has the T-section trucks with which it was delivered. Can anyone read what is on the wood placard board on the car sides?

Tony Thompson




SP steel gondola in a PRR maintenance yard in Philadelphia in 1920

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
We get to see an SP steel gondola in a PRR maintenance yard in Philadelphia in 1920
 
This gon is a long way from home!
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


PRR RF and R7 reefers in 1917...

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
PRR 'UNION LINE' class RF reefers in 1917...
 
 
 
PRR RF and R7 reefers in 1917...
 
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Photo: Unloading Can Stock (1948)

earlyrail
 

Unloading cans, not can stock.
Can stock would be flat sheets.

Howard Garner

11741 - 11760 of 195468