Date   

Re: SFRD Refrigerator in Difficulty

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Garth and List Members,
 
Bohn ventilators?
 
Thanks for the wonderful image Garth!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2021 12:11 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] SFRD Refrigerator in Difficulty

Friends,

This photo has been in my collection for years. I finally got it scanned and cleaned up for your interest and approval. Sorry there are no numbers visible. I think we can chalk that up to orthographic film.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Re: Photos: Chicago Freight Yard

Bill Parks
 

Does anyone have any information on the piggy back trailers in the pictures?  I've never seen any with a waffle side like those.

Thanks

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Photo: Unidentified PRR Gondola (1929)

Dave Parker
 

With a minimal amount of noodling around the UMW site, you can find the other views of this car and eliminate the guesswork about the car number.  Here's a link to one of them:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/mke-polonia/id/34015/rec/2
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: Unidentified PRR Gondola (1929)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
This PRR gondola was built (month-illegible)-13, and the PRR class marks "GRa" are just barely discernable if you zoom in enough. It has PRR 'center-bar' style lettering - this lettering style had been discontinued some years before the 1929 date of the photo image.
 
I spent a little time monkeying with the image in a photo editor program - see attachment. My interpretation is that this is car PRR 3XX216, where the two digits XX are not really legible. Looking over my 11-1929 ORER, I would figure this car to be PRR 355216, part of class GRa series 355084-357000.
 
Thanks Bob, great photo!
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2021 11:59 AM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unidentified PRR Gondola (1929)

Photo: Unidentified PRR Gondola (1929)

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/mke-polonia/id/33889/rec/115

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Notice the “Weigh” placard.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photos: Chicago Freight Yard

Schuyler Larrabee
 

A pretty dubious distinction from a real estate point of view!

 

OTOH, a predecessor to the now ubiquitous “needle towers” with one condo per floor in NYC.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Chicago Freight Yard

 

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 09:02 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/11545/rec/57

Cool. South Water Street terminal. That skinny little spire to the left in the skyline is Mather Tower, which was the headquarters of the Mather Stock Car Co. and briefly the tallest building in Chicago when completed in 1928. The interior space within the upper octagonal spire contains the least square footage per floor of any Chicago skyscaper.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photos: Chicago Freight Yard

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 09:02 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/11545/rec/57
Cool. South Water Street terminal. That skinny little spire to the left in the skyline is Mather Tower, which was the headquarters of the Mather Stock Car Co. and briefly the tallest building in Chicago when completed in 1928. The interior space within the upper octagonal spire contains the least square footage per floor of any Chicago skyscaper.

Dennis Storzek


SFRD Refrigerator in Difficulty

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Friends,

This photo has been in my collection for years. I finally got it scanned and cleaned up for your interest and approval. Sorry there are no numbers visible. I think we can chalk that up to orthographic film.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Re: Photo: Unidentified PRR Gondola (1929)

Dave Parker
 

I don't know if they came from this source, but I have this and two other shots of the same car -- 355216, class GRa.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Photo: DSS&A Boxcar 11560 (1929)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: DSS&A Boxcar 11560 (1929)

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/9919/rec/6

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photos: Chicago Freight Yard

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: Chicago Freight Yard

Photos from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/10374/rec/51

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/11545/rec/57

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/8196/rec/87

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/8258/rec/98

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photos to enlarge them.

Date: “Not before 1955”

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Tank Cars At Chicago Plant

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Tank Cars At Chicago Plant

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/9415/rec/97

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Date: “Not before 1958”

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photos: Loading Or Unloading A Milk Car (1947)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: Loading Or Unloading A Milk Car (1947)

Photos from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/8834/rec/21

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/9289/rec/12

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photos to enlarge them.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Unidentified PRR Gondola (1929)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Unidentified PRR Gondola (1929)

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/mke-polonia/id/33889/rec/115

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Notice the “Weigh” placard.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Painting Kadee HGC Trucks

James Brewer
 

I use a rattle can of Rust-Oleum Automobile, #2089 Dark Gray Primer, with no grit blasting; sometimes I wipe the trucks with Isopropyl alcohol before applying the paint.

Jim Brewer


Re: Photo: Unloading Can Stock (1948)

Jim Betz
 
Edited

Hi all,
  When I was in H.S. I worked in a salmon cannery.  Our cans all came to us
fully made up (no lid) in large cardboard boxes of perhaps 1000 cans at a
time.  The box was the size of a pallet on the bottom and about 4 feet tall.
I worked in the warehouse crew and the cans came in box cars, were
off loaded by driving a fork lift into the car and picking them up.  They
were stacked 2 'cases' tall in the box car with the pallet already under
them and strapped to the pallet with two 3/4" wide metal straps.  From
the warehouse they went up to the 2nd story (lifted up by fork lift) and
were stored in "the can loft" which was over the canning lines.  The
box straps were cut off and the top opened up and they were put into
a sort of hopper/feeder that the cans rolled out of and down to the
canning machines by gravity.  The canning machines 'took' one can
at a time from the gravity line and put it in front of a ram where the
salmon was rammed into it (after having been cut to length).  The
ram went back and forth ... bang, bang, bang ... several times a
minute (perhaps once a second) and every time it took a can the
cans in the gravity line would advance.
  The lids were shipped in the same box cars with the cans and
were in boxes of several hundred at a time - perhaps one box of
lids held the number needed for one box of empty cans?  The 
lids were also put on the cans by machine - between the canning
machine with the ram and the lidding machine was a line of 
workers (all women - then) that trimmed up the weight of the
can to a perfect pound/half pound/quarter pound by adding a
bit or two of salmon.
  After the lids were put on and sealed the cans were stacked on
steel racks (think 'trays') and the trays were stacked up on a
small wheeled dolly (think RR wheels) that was pushed by hand
to the retort where it was cooked under steam pressure for a
long time (3 or 4 hours).  Then it was brought out and sent to
the labeling line, put into cases, stacked on pallets ... and 
shipped out by rail to 'the world' (usually went East out of
Everett, Wa.).

  I also worked in another salmon cannery.  This one was in Hawk
Inlet, Alaska and it had a similar operation - the differences being
that the cans came in by ship and the entire cannery was powered
by a boiler driving a stationary steam engine driving an overhead
belt power system that had 12" (?) bents running around wheels
of approximately 18" in diameter.  You can see an overhead belt
powered system if you look for pictures of the Sierra Railroad's
roundhouse in Sonora, Ca.

  One of the symmetries of shipping to be filled cans in those
cardboard boxes is that the number of car loads of cases was
essentially identical to the number of car loads of outbound
product.

  I can't imagine the kind of operation in this picture lasted very
long before it was replaced by the boxes of cans style.  The "rails"
the guy is setting up in that picture are similar to how the cans in
the canneries moved from the can loft to the canning machines.
                                                                                  - Jim


Re: ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

vapeurchapelon
 

Paul, many thanks to you too! Nice pic of an attractive paint scheme, but as you already may have seen, Tim O'Connor sent exactly what I was looking for.
A silver SP box car like this doubtless looks very nice, but aside of the too late date for me, it seems that at least 90-95% of steam era box cars were fcr or brown, that's why I will let the model repaint as the car shown at Tims photo.
 
Many greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Samstag, 24. April 2021 um 14:54 Uhr
Von: "Paul Doggett via groups.io" <paul.doggett2472@...>
An: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions
Johannes 
 
In your period they would still be running in black, around 1955 they were repainted silver with the blocked lettering style. One for Tony Thompson to answer fully.


Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 
 
 

On 24 Apr 2021, at 13:40, vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@...> wrote:
 
Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954


Re: ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

vapeurchapelon
 

Lots of thanks, Tim! This is PERFECT! :-) The file name even says "1948-1954 style paint scheme"!
 
Many greetings
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Samstag, 24. April 2021 um 14:53 Uhr
Von: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

This appears to be a repaint prior to the use of the large Southern Pacific roadname. See the attached.

Tim O'Connor



On 4/24/2021 8:39 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Victor Hand Photo of Erie Railroad yards in Jersey City NJ August 1957

Chris Barkan
 

Lots of interesting steam era freight cars visible in this photo.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/44611217185

It is part of the Victor Hand Collection  of EL photos at
https://railphoto-art.org/collections/victor-hand-collection/erie-lackawanna-railway/
Although not primarily focused on freight cars there are several other photos with interesting cars visible,
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Re: ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

Paul Doggett
 

Johannes 

In your period they would still be running in black, around 1955 they were repainted silver with the blocked lettering style. One for Tony Thompson to answer fully.


Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 

On 24 Apr 2021, at 13:40, vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@...> wrote:

Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954


Re: ex-SP Overnight cars B-50-24 repaint questions

Tim O'Connor
 


This appears to be a repaint prior to the use of the large Southern Pacific roadname. See the attached.

Tim O'Connor



On 4/24/2021 8:39 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
Hello friends,

I am always looking for variety for my box car collection and found this one which I would be very interested in:

https://railmodel.com/product/bcm-0158

If I remember correctly that lettering scheme first appeared sometimes in 1955 - which is slightly after my model time frame ending in 1954, so I would have to repaint the model. I am specifically interested in the possible appearences of these cars after their Overnight service. Would it be correct to paint it fcr but with an earlier lettering scheme as currently seen on the model?
Or would it even be possible to make a car of another road? The car sides were unique, but according to this site:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp-b-50-24main.html

Cotton Belt and UP also had cars with that side wall design.
Of course I searched the group archive but got hundreds of results which would take me months to find the appropriate answers I am afraid.

Many thanks for any help, and many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

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