Date   

Re: Photo: Unloading Grain

Clarence Zink
 

Tilting boxcars to unload grain reminds me of the Jay's Potato Chip factory on the south side of Chicago in the late 1950's.  My family would drive by there on occasion, and there were usually one or two 18 wheel trailer trucks tilted way up in the air, unloading potatoes.  Made a lasting impression on a 9 year old!

CRZ


C&I Hopper 2423 underside view

gary laakso
 

Here is the underside view and note the non-matching wheels of the truck in the PRR gondola behind it:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/16038384558/in/photostream/ 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Steve SANDIFER
 

It is preserved at the Monticello RR Museum.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jack Mullen
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2021 12:13 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

 

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 09:26 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:

I once read somewhere about a modern streamlined car that was operated by a major aquarium, though I don't remember who owned it. Probably long retired now.

That may be the Nautilus II, of Chicago's Shedd Aquarium, operated 1959-72 It was built by Pullman as a baggage-tavern-chair car for C&EI in 1946, rebuilt by Thrall in 1959.
This Chicago Tribune article discusses this car and the 
first Nautilus, a 1930 heavyweight.
"GONE FISHIN' - Chicago Tribune" https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1999-06-06-9906060361-story,amp.html

Jack Mullen


Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Soo Line #44500-45098 Series Boxcar #44500-45098

Bruce Smith
 

Bob,

I would concur with others who have said that this not really an "extreme" weathering job. Rather it looks to me to be a hard-working steam era freight car nearing its appointment with the paint shop. And it looks good!

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chapman <chapbob4014@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2021 11:16 AM
To: STMFC E-List <main@Realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Soo Line #44500-45098 Series Boxcar
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
We'll call this one "Weathering Gone Wild". I usually prefer to understate weathering, but this undec Accurail was a convention door prize, and other than a few detail modifications, served as a test bed for some extreme weathering. In the old days, I can remember most passing trains having at least one of these paint derelicts.
 
The car models the Soo Line #44500-45098 series (even numbers only). Decals are K4.
 
Regards,
Bob Chapman


Soo Line Livestock Car 29667

Bob Chaparro
 

Soo Line Livestock Car 29667

A link to the Mid-Continent Railway Museum website:

https://www.midcontinent.org/equipment-roster/wooden-freight-cars/soo-line-29967/

Click on the photos to enlarge them.

Description:

“Soo Line stock car #29667 was built in a series of 400 cars, numbered from 29600 through 29999, by the Haskell & Barker Car Co., specifically to haul livestock. It was delivered to the Soo Line in July 1921. This 40 ton capacity, 40 foot long car was constructed to AAR Classification “SM” designation, meaning that it is of single deck design with open slatted side construction for the transportation of livestock on the hoof. In revenue service, Soo Line #29667 moved many loads of cattle from the North Dakota and Minnesota farm communities to the Chicago markets.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Jack Mullen
 

On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 09:26 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
I once read somewhere about a modern streamlined car that was operated by a major aquarium, though I don't remember who owned it. Probably long retired now.
That may be the Nautilus II, of Chicago's Shedd Aquarium, operated 1959-72. It was built by Pullman as a baggage-tavern-chair car for C&EI in 1946, rebuilt by Thrall in 1959.
This Chicago Tribune article discusses this car and the 
first Nautilus, a 1930 heavyweight.
"GONE FISHIN' - Chicago Tribune" https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1999-06-06-9906060361-story,amp.html

Jack Mullen


Oops... Re: Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Ray Hutchison
 

I misread a section of the website (and the sentence that I quoted) that made it clear that transportation is now by tank truck.  So I will be looking for metal trucks out on the highway labeled "live fish".  And looking for Department of Commerce decals.


Re: Soo Line #44500-45098 Series Boxcar #44500-45098

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Bob,

 

I wouldn’t even say that weathering is extreme.  Looks like a lot of cars I’ve seen and it’s very well done!

 

Do I detect some Greg Martin style shading on the panels?  And I think the trucks look superb!

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chapman
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2021 12:17 PM
To: STMFC E-List <main@Realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Soo Line #44500-45098 Series Boxcar

 

We'll call this one "Weathering Gone Wild". I usually prefer to understate weathering, but this undec Accurail was a convention door prize, and other than a few detail modifications, served as a test bed for some extreme weathering. In the old days, I can remember most passing trains having at least one of these paint derelicts.

 

The car models the Soo Line #44500-45098 series (even numbers only). Decals are K4.

 

Regards,

Bob Chapman


Re: Soo Line #44500-45098 Series Boxcar #44500-45098

Paul Doggett
 

Bob 

That’s looking really good.

Paul Doggett      England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 29 Apr 2021, at 17:17, Bob Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:


We'll call this one "Weathering Gone Wild". I usually prefer to understate weathering, but this undec Accurail was a convention door prize, and other than a few detail modifications, served as a test bed for some extreme weathering. In the old days, I can remember most passing trains having at least one of these paint derelicts.
 
The car models the Soo Line #44500-45098 series (even numbers only). Decals are K4.
 
Regards,
Bob Chapman

Attachments:


Re: Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Ray,

I seriously doubt that there are any fish cars still active, as they are not something that Amtrak, or freight railroads, would be excited about handling. However, as you can see there are at least two preserved examples.

I once read somewhere about a modern streamlined car that was operated by a major aquarium, though I don't remember who owned it. Probably long retired now.

All that said, the Government still has some interesting refurbished passenger cars that do run on modern railroads. A few years ago I photographed DOTX 220, a futuristic business car yet with a real open rear planform, and companion DOTX 223 which looked like a short single-door baggage car. DOTX 220 was lettered "Federal Railroad Administration" and "Office of Safety". They were in the ex-SP yard in Roseville, California.

This is, of course, post-STMFC period, and getting into passenger cars, so I will quit here. If anybody wants to see the photos, contact me off-list. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆



On Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 12:09 PM Ray Hutchison <rayhutchison2@...> wrote:
This is pretty interesting... need to find out where to get Department of Commerce decals!

I noted the following at the Catskills website in Garth's post:

"Nowadays a fleet of modern tank trucks transports more than 200 million fish a year from Fish and Wildlife Service National Fish Hatcheries to stock many of the nation's rivers, lakes, and coastal waters."

That is from document published 1979.  While there are fish hatcheries in every state (and in Madison WI there is Fish Hatchery Road!) I am wondering if there still are dish cars and what they might look like?

rh

 

 


Soo Line #44500-45098 Series Boxcar #44500-45098

Bob Chapman
 

We'll call this one "Weathering Gone Wild". I usually prefer to understate weathering, but this undec Accurail was a convention door prize, and other than a few detail modifications, served as a test bed for some extreme weathering. In the old days, I can remember most passing trains having at least one of these paint derelicts.
 
The car models the Soo Line #44500-45098 series (even numbers only). Decals are K4.
 
Regards,
Bob Chapman


Re: Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Ray Hutchison
 

This is pretty interesting... need to find out where to get Department of Commerce decals!

I noted the following at the Catskills website in Garth's post:

"Nowadays a fleet of modern tank trucks transports more than 200 million fish a year from Fish and Wildlife Service National Fish Hatcheries to stock many of the nation's rivers, lakes, and coastal waters."

That is from document published 1979.  While there are fish hatcheries in every state (and in Madison WI there is Fish Hatchery Road!) I am wondering if there still are dish cars and what they might look like?

rh

 

 


Re: Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Bob,

Interesting car, and very nicely restored. 

A number of other states owned fish cars as well. A similar car with a diagram of the interior layout is shown on page 367 of the 1919 CAR BUILDERS' DICTIONARY. This was reproduced in Gregg's TRAIN SHED CYCLOPEDIA NO. 36.

There is an interesting page on the 10 Booth fish cars operated by the U.S. Department of Commerce at https://www.fws.gov/dcbooth/fishcars.htm . Apparently, one car survives at the D.C. Booth Hatchery Museum in South Dakota.

Another interesting site is found at http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/fishcar.Html .

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Apr 28, 2021 at 1:29 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Link courtesy of Rich Mahaney:

https://www.midcontinent.org/equipment-roster/wooden-passenger-cars/wisconsin-fish-commission-2/

Click on the photos to enlarge them.

This car was fitted with steel tanks to carry fish to remote locations around the state to restock streams and rivers. The car would be stopped on a bridge and the tanks emptied into the water below.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Bob Chaparro
 

Wisconsin Fish Commission Car “Badger”

Link courtesy of Rich Mahaney:

https://www.midcontinent.org/equipment-roster/wooden-passenger-cars/wisconsin-fish-commission-2/

Click on the photos to enlarge them.

This car was fitted with steel tanks to carry fish to remote locations around the state to restock streams and rivers. The car would be stopped on a bridge and the tanks emptied into the water below.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: Photo: Unloading Grain

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

What I said. Unloading grain (or other) filled boxcars by hand was slow, labor intensive, and expensive. Obviously expensive enough for big operations to purchase these elaborate machines to speed up the process.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 28, 2021, at 11:14 AM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

True there were grain un-loaders as Dan describes. Photos attached. Usually installed are very large terminal grain ports, where time was crucial, ie to load a waiting ship. Or where a large number of cars were handled every day, ie a large flour mill. Because of the expense and complexity these un-loaders were not found at the local feed mill or grain elevator.
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Daniel A. Mitchell
Sent: Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:58 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain
 
Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.
 
It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.
 
One of these things would make a fabulous model.
 
Dan Mitchell
==========


On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:
 
out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry
 
On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:
Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes. 
 
Doug Harding
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain
 
Photo: Unloading Grain
A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:
Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA
 
 
 

<GN grain unloading lightened.jpg><GN grain unloading2 lighhtened.jpg><GN grain unloading3 lightened.jpg>


Re: Photo: Unloading Grain

Douglas Harding
 

True there were grain un-loaders as Dan describes. Photos attached. Usually installed are very large terminal grain ports, where time was crucial, ie to load a waiting ship. Or where a large number of cars were handled every day, ie a large flour mill. Because of the expense and complexity these un-loaders were not found at the local feed mill or grain elevator.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Daniel A. Mitchell
Sent: Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:58 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.

 

It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.

 

One of these things would make a fabulous model.

 

Dan Mitchell

==========



On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

 

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were

required and how long it took to

manually unload a boxcar loaded with

grain?

thanks

mel perry

 

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 

 

 


Re: Photo: Unloading Grain

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.

It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.

One of these things would make a fabulous model.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain
A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:
Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA





Re: Photo: Freight Cars On Barges

jace6315
 

One of the main reasons the railroads hauled carfloats like this in New York harbor was so that they could minimize shifting at the float bridges. The tug stays in the middle while the barges split the rack by removing the line connecting the two barges at their bows. A good crew could essentially land two barges at once, a big factor considering the volume of freight moving by carfloats across New York harbor at one point, not to mention the high costs of the railroad marine operations.

Jim Matthews

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Tuesday, April 27, 2021 4:30 PM, SamClarke via groups.io <samc@...> wrote:

Not being a barge expert, since I was born and raised in Nevada, I can see the reason of the “V” as the tug is actually pushing against sides of the barges sort of wedged in. The lashing is meant to keep the barges from spliting from the force of the tug and not the towing force. I imagine that the tug has more control pushing the “V” rather than pushing (pulling) on the lashing if the barges were lashed more symmetrically.

 

As I mentioned earlier the trucks look like 1954/55 Internations thus dating the photo to about that time.

 

 

 


 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of kevinhlafferty
Sent: Monday, April 26, 2021 4:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Freight Cars On Barges

 

As noted previously by both Dennis and Bruce there are indeed aft lines securing the tug to the barges; the port aft line is visible in this view taken moments before. Also visible in this view is a considerable amount of slack in the fore barge to barge line which would indicate that the lashing isn’t quite as secure as it might be. I would guess the aft lines are working overtime at this moment. Not having experience in large nautical equipment I have to ask is there some advantage to a V configuration of the barges vs. a more symmetric lash up?

 

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/11580/rec/2

 

Kevin Lafferty

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Monday, April 26, 2021 2:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Freight Cars On Barges

 

Having watched barges and tows on the Mississippi River, I know there are winches on the barge, used to tighten all lines. There are also large binders used by the crew to tighten lines that are not directly tied to the tow. This keeps the barges and tow (what the tugs are called on the river) as a rigid single unit. Note the two barges are tied together at the nose, with no visible slack.

 

 

Sent: Monday, April 26, 2021 12:04 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Freight Cars On Barges

 

Interesting. The tug is churning along under power towards the bottom of the picture. Yet the cables off the tug's bow up to the barges have no slack. How does that work?

On 26/04/2021 9:58 a.m., Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photo: Freight Cars On Barges

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/11939/rec/60

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

-- 
Colin Riley
20-2500 Florence Lake Road
Victoria BC V9B 4H2




Re: Photo: Unloading Grain

mel perry
 

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/6696/rec/31

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Unloading Grain

Douglas Harding
 

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain

A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:

https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agsnorth/id/6696/rec/31

Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

4061 - 4080 of 187908