Date   

Re: Railroad Men's Club

Mike Settle
 

It was an expensive share of stock, too. 100 dollars in 1925 is equivalent to just a little over 1500 dollars today.


Re: Army Flatcars

 

Forgot to color correct.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...>
Date: Sunday, May 2, 2021 at 9:56 AM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Army Flatcars

 

I found a similar car in Kaiserslautern when I was serving in the Army in 1979.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, May 1, 2021 at 10:55 PM
To: realSTMFC <realstmfc@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Army Flatcars

 

They have the huge brake wheel on the side of the car and what appear to be end buffers:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49210936658/in/album-72157712179496252/ 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: Army Flatcars

 

I found a similar car in Kaiserslautern when I was serving in the Army in 1979.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, May 1, 2021 at 10:55 PM
To: realSTMFC <realstmfc@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Army Flatcars

 

They have the huge brake wheel on the side of the car and what appear to be end buffers:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49210936658/in/album-72157712179496252/ 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: flat on flat WWII

Lee
 

Notice the letters in Russian and CCCP marking.....


Re: Railroad Men's Club

Bill Parks
 

On Sun, May 2, 2021 at 10:14 AM, Doug Paasch wrote:
This is pure guesswork but I heard somewhere long ago that all members of a club are considered "owners" of the club and can be held personally liable for any actions against the club, such as injury lawsuits, etc.  Perhaps by incorporating the club, it was now a corporate entity and members are now just stockholders rather than actual owners of the club in order to hide behind a corporate shield???  I could be totally off here though
Doug - 

That is probably why the incorporated.  Even today non-profits incorporate (NMRA for an example) thus providing a legal shield for the members (among other reasons).  It is possible 100 years ago, Florida required stock to be issued for any "corporation".
 
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Railroad Men's Club

BillM
 

A thought is as some have said a social club. Private “social” clubs were a way to get around blue laws or other ordinances like dry counties. Just a thought.

Bill Michael

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Parks via groups.io
Sent: May 1, 2021 1:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Railroad Men's Club

 

In cleaning out my parent's house, we came across a stock certificate (see below) for the Railroad Men's Club that my grandfather bought (1 share for $100) in 1925 when he was working for the Seaboard Airline in Jacksonville.

I've done a Google search, but can not find any information about this organization.  Does anyone know anything about it?

Thanks in advance.




--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


folding brake gear

kevinhlafferty
 

Three views of what I believe to be a Barber design folding brake wheel for drop end gondolas 1932.
https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-pVn8SG7/A
https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-M74jqh6/A
https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-FCkN57k/A

Kevin Lafferty


Re: Railroad Men's Club

Doug Paasch
 

This is pure guesswork but I heard somewhere long ago that all members of a club are considered "owners" of the club and can be held personally liable for any actions against the club, such as injury lawsuits, etc.  Perhaps by incorporating the club, it was now a corporate entity and members are now just stockholders rather than actual owners of the club in order to hide behind a corporate shield???  I could be totally off here though.

Doug Paasch


On Sun, May 2, 2021, 8:04 AM Bill Parks via groups.io <BPARKS_43=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
Kevin - 

Thanks for the feedback.  I did some more digging last night and came the same conclusion.  These were probably local social clubs that may have had some support (official or unofficial) from the railroads.  I also found on EBay (when all else fails, search there) where someone is selling a page dated late 1800s that showed a Railroad Men's Club that was built by the Vanderbilts for their employees.

As a former stock broker, I found it a bit odd that a non-profit would issue an actual stock certificate.  Looking at it, this is not something someone decided to just print up so you can show you're a member.  It has all the legal jargon and seals, and appear that everything was registered with the state under existing incorporation laws of the day. Like you, I have never seen a private club do this.  Normally, you pay an initiation fee, then on-going dues.  At the same time he joined this club, my grandfather was the secretary for the German-American Club in Jacksonville, and documents we have relating to that indicate just initiation fees and dues.  No mention of "stock".  I'm wondering if some lawyer talked the Railroad Club into doing it this way.  A question we may never know the answer to.

This has given me the idea of possibly creating stock certificates for the operating group I'm in.  Might make a fun Christmas present.

This is an interesting piece of railroad history, and hopefully one not totally lost to time.

As an aside, my grandfather grew up on a farm and believed only in investing in real estate.  I remember him saying many times that if you can't go and physically see what you own, and run your fingers through the dirt, then don't buy it, and through out his life, he always owned multiple rental properties.  Given that, this is probably the only "stock" certificate he ever put his name one (my grandmother, on the other hand, played the market and did quite well).

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Railroad Men's Club

Bill Parks
 

Kevin - 

Thanks for the feedback.  I did some more digging last night and came the same conclusion.  These were probably local social clubs that may have had some support (official or unofficial) from the railroads.  I also found on EBay (when all else fails, search there) where someone is selling a page dated late 1800s that showed a Railroad Men's Club that was built by the Vanderbilts for their employees.

As a former stock broker, I found it a bit odd that a non-profit would issue an actual stock certificate.  Looking at it, this is not something someone decided to just print up so you can show you're a member.  It has all the legal jargon and seals, and appear that everything was registered with the state under existing incorporation laws of the day. Like you, I have never seen a private club do this.  Normally, you pay an initiation fee, then on-going dues.  At the same time he joined this club, my grandfather was the secretary for the German-American Club in Jacksonville, and documents we have relating to that indicate just initiation fees and dues.  No mention of "stock".  I'm wondering if some lawyer talked the Railroad Club into doing it this way.  A question we may never know the answer to.

This has given me the idea of possibly creating stock certificates for the operating group I'm in.  Might make a fun Christmas present.

This is an interesting piece of railroad history, and hopefully one not totally lost to time.

As an aside, my grandfather grew up on a farm and believed only in investing in real estate.  I remember him saying many times that if you can't go and physically see what you own, and run your fingers through the dirt, then don't buy it, and through out his life, he always owned multiple rental properties.  Given that, this is probably the only "stock" certificate he ever put his name one (my grandmother, on the other hand, played the market and did quite well).

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: More unloading firetrucks

Allen Cain
 

Richard, could you share what you are doing?

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.

Brian Carlson
 

Many/most of the x32s were at the yard at the Pennsy freight station. 
I got the impression the film was early 40’s since none of the freight equipment appears beat from the war effort. (I could be totally wrong)

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 2, 2021, at 8:56 AM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


Yes,

And in the second view, you see a multi-dome wine tank car.

Note that the "many" PRR arch roof boxcars consists of 2 X31F cars and then what appears to be a yard FULL of X32, 50' cars. To see so many of those cars in one location is very interesting. It may mean that they are in storage, or assigned service. Given the uncertain date of the film, it may also be that they represent X32s being collected for use as troop sleepers, or, having finished that service, being returned to that service... although the Philly location makes that less likely.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 2, 2021 7:26 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Interestingly, it's both times the same run - seemingly filmed with two cameras which were positioned differently.
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Sonntag, 02. Mai 2021 um 03:07 Uhr
Von: "John Mateyko" <rattler21@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.
Also shows many PRR versions of the wagon top box car.  John


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.

Bruce Smith
 

Yes,

And in the second view, you see a multi-dome wine tank car.

Note that the "many" PRR arch roof boxcars consists of 2 X31F cars and then what appears to be a yard FULL of X32, 50' cars. To see so many of those cars in one location is very interesting. It may mean that they are in storage, or assigned service. Given the uncertain date of the film, it may also be that they represent X32s being collected for use as troop sleepers, or, having finished that service, being returned to that service... although the Philly location makes that less likely.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 2, 2021 7:26 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Interestingly, it's both times the same run - seemingly filmed with two cameras which were positioned differently.
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Sonntag, 02. Mai 2021 um 03:07 Uhr
Von: "John Mateyko" <rattler21@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.
Also shows many PRR versions of the wagon top box car.  John


Re: More unloading firetrucks

vapeurchapelon
 

Allen,
 
as long as we are speaking H0scale, I can say there are some brass models with operating end doors. I remember Oriental Limited importing a SP 50' car, outside-braces but with steel sides, a C&O 40' steel box car from the same importer, and a UP 50' outside-braced car imported by Overland.
I have one of the SP cars and saw pics of the other ones - none of the three match today's standards in detail.
Possibly there were others, but I don't know.
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Sonntag, 02. Mai 2021 um 06:06 Uhr
Von: "Allen Cain" <Allencaintn@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] More unloading firetrucks
This would make an interesting siding. Does anyone make opening end doors that operate?  Has anyone modified a car to have open end doors?
--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


Re: Philadelphia 1940’s video.

vapeurchapelon
 

Interestingly, it's both times the same run - seemingly filmed with two cameras which were positioned differently.
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Sonntag, 02. Mai 2021 um 03:07 Uhr
Von: "John Mateyko" <rattler21@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.
Also shows many PRR versions of the wagon top box car.  John


Re: Railroad Men's Club

kevinhlafferty
 

On Sat, May 1, 2021, 10:23 AM Bill Parks wrote:

 

In cleaning out my parent's house, we came across a stock certificate (see below) for the Railroad Men's Club that my grandfather bought (1 share for $100) in 1925 when he was working for the Seaboard Airline in Jacksonville.

I've done a Google search, but can not find any information about this organization.  Does anyone know anything about it?

 

Bill,

Can’t say I know anything about this particular Club but it seems they may have been fairly common in the ‘20s timeframe. I found a couple of other references, one to a Southern Pacific Railroad Men’s Club and another to a Frisco Railroad Men’s Club. I think they were private “social” clubs specifically for members of a particular railroad. The reference I found to the SP club involved a court case as a result of a police raid at the San Francisco clubhouse with several members run in for gambling. Also, a non-profit organization cannot sell stock so I suspect the “stock certificate” may have been in lieu of dues. Perhaps it was an effort to make it more palatable to your significant other that you were investing in stock rather than paying dues to a social club?

Interesting stuff none the less.

 

Kevin Lafferty

 


Re: More unloading firetrucks

Richard Townsend
 

I am working on one with open end doors. Side doors open, too, with full interior lining.


Re: Army Flatcars

Jim Gates
 

Tanks are M4A3 (76) W (HVSS). Which means 1945. Flats belong to US Army Transportation Corps. Probably taken in France, possibly just after the tanks were unloaded from a ship.

Jim Gates

On Saturday, May 1, 2021, 10:55:28 PM CDT, gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:


They have the huge brake wheel on the side of the car and what appear to be end buffers:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49210936658/in/album-72157712179496252/ 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: More unloading firetrucks

Patrick Wade
 

I think they are unloading the engine. There are two firemen in slickers awaiting to drive it away. If it was being loaded only the manufacturer's workers would be involved. 

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 8:46 PM kevinhlafferty <khlafferty@...> wrote:
Several interesting photos here including the PRR X30, a single car class.
http://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/2019/08/carrying-vehicles-in-boxcars.html


Re: More unloading firetrucks

Allen Cain
 

This would make an interesting siding. Does anyone make opening end doors that operate?  Has anyone modified a car to have open end doors?
--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


Army Flatcars

gary laakso
 

They have the huge brake wheel on the side of the car and what appear to be end buffers:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49210936658/in/album-72157712179496252/ 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

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