Date   

Re: Photo: Unloading Grain

Philip Dove
 

In 1997 I was in Thunder bay Canada standing on one of the docks. The other side of the water was a row of rail served silos and covered hopper cars were unloading I was very surprised it seemed to be taking about 5 minutes to unload a car measuring about 50' long, It would seem there is no really fast way of unloading grain even now. Are there any dangers connected with a build up of static electricity if all the grain pours out  rapidly in one direction? 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Wed, 28 Apr 2021 at 13:57, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:
Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.

It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.

One of these things would make a fabulous model.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain
A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:
Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA





Re: L&N 51098 (was NRC Banana Reefer)

ROGER HINMAN
 

I can’t read the number on the NRC reefer, but based on the hatch platforms it appears to be one of the 500 cars they leased from IC and would be in the NRC10000-10999 series. Roger Hinman


On May 2, 2021, at 1:15 PM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Claus, 

That image is one of four 1932 Dayton Union Station photos recently added to the Barriger Flickr site. Here's the link to review all four. 

There's some overlap to the images. The first on that page is a great shot featuring an amazing look at seven B&O freight cars, all of different classes. After downloading the largest image and futzing around with some Photoshoppery, I was able to determine several car numbers. From left to right, here's the breakdown.

#265xxx is one of the original M-26 class cars built in 1925.

M-24 USRA single-sheathed car. The B&O was assigned only 500 of these cars.

#194938 is an M-15a class automobile boxcar built in 1912.

#172247 is an M-18 class car built in 1916. This class is an oddity to me as the B&O installed a few thousand M-15 cars with fish belly steel center sills  in the years just before these M-18 arrived with truss rods and a steel center sill.

#180177 is an M-13 class built in 1906.

#165685 is an M-12 class built in 1902

#175399 is an M-15d class built in 1922-23. They were built new with wood roofs, an oddity for new cars the 1920s.

Another M-18 class car, 172513, appears in the second image.

The last image covers the area between the first and third images, and features the Northern Banana and ART reefers. On the left we see the well-weathered M-15d from teh first image. On the right is M-18 #172513. Of interest are two gondolas lurking on back tracks that seem to be delivering coal to a couple dealer trucks. B&O 257952 is an O-27b built in 1929. This is one of a few thousand USRA copies the B&O installed in the 1920s. Note the corrugated ends are different from the USRA ends.

The other gondola is an L&N steel gondola with drop doors, one of 9000 built in the 1920s and coming soon as an HO scale resin kit.


Eric Hansmann 
Murfreesboro, TN


On 05/02/2021 10:00 AM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi Gary and List Members,

I especially like the mini-scene with the two gondolas carrying coal. A bit difficult to discern, but looks to my eyes it looks like there is a work crew of at least two men in the gon L&N 51098, bent over like they are shoveling the coal. Note the A C Jones coal trucks parked directly next to to the gon. An entirely modelable scene for any size railroad, don't you think? It appears the B&O 257952 gon is also involved in the same operation

My Dec 1930 ORER sez the following about L&N 51098: series 50000-56499, 40ft 6in IL, 100000 lb, 6448 cars,  MCB type GA

My memory sez MCB type GA is a drop bottom gon, is that right? In that case, are the drop doors being used by the crew to help in unloading, or are they just using the shovels to toss the coal over the gon sides and into the truck beds? Thoughts? I checked B&O 257952, it is type GM (mill gon) which I think would NOT have drop doors of any sort...

Claus Schlund



Re: Paint stripper

John Sykes III
 

I forgot, the new version of Walthers Solvaset no longer uses butyl cellosolve.  It doesn't work as well as the old Hobsco.


Re: Paint stripper

John Sykes III
 

Ordinary 91% isopropyl alcohol and butyl cellosolve (2-butoxyethanol).
I customize my mixtures depending on the plastic I am stripping, 5% butyl cellosolve for ABS and up to 10% butyl cellosolve for styrenes.  For old Tyco and AHM models there is a fine line between removing the paint and causing the plastic to craze, so be careful.  Also be careful not to get water into the mixture, 91% isopropyl is the lowest concentration of isopropyl that will work.  Note that a few percent of butyl cellosolve in water with a trace of a surfactant is an excellent decal setting solution (e.g., MicroSol, Solvaset or Champ decal setting solution).  Again, too much butyl cellosolve with dissolve the decal or even start to remove the paint.

Butyl cellosolve can be bought in most paint stores that supply professional painters, in gallon and 5-gallon cans.  It is used as a thinner to slow the drying of lacquers by cabinet & furniture makers, etc. for a high-gloss finish.


Re: Paint stripper

Charlie Vlk
 

Walt-
That is the one.... Chameleon....!!
Thanks!
Charlie Vlk


On May 1, 2021, at 7:34 PM, Walter Cox via groups.io <WaltGCox@...> wrote:


Could you be thinking of Chameleon? That was the best I ever used,I still have a bit left that I use sparingly when all else fails. I think someone came up with the formula for it recently so there should be something in the archives.
Walt         
 
In a message dated 4/30/2021 4:06:53 PM Eastern Standard Time, cvlk@... writes:
 

Seems to me there was a commercial hobby paint stripper whose name escapes me at the moment e eeavailable before “EasyLiftOff” that worked well.  

The only problem with petroleum-based paint strippers is that, while they removed the paint, they also removed some of the plasticizers from the molded plastic which made them brittle and allowed release of some of the internal stresses of the molding process, sometimes causing spontaneous shattering of the shell or warping.  This is a non-chemist/plastics expert explanation of some of the failures I had especially early on (1960s/70s).

Charlie Vlk


Re: L&N 51098 (was NRC Banana Reefer)

Eric Hansmann
 

Claus,

That image is one of four 1932 Dayton Union Station photos recently added to the Barriger Flickr site. Here's the link to review all four.

There's some overlap to the images. The first on that page is a great shot featuring an amazing look at seven B&O freight cars, all of different classes. After downloading the largest image and futzing around with some Photoshoppery, I was able to determine several car numbers. From left to right, here's the breakdown.

#265xxx is one of the original M-26 class cars built in 1925.

M-24 USRA single-sheathed car. The B&O was assigned only 500 of these cars.

#194938 is an M-15a class automobile boxcar built in 1912.

#172247 is an M-18 class car built in 1916. This class is an oddity to me as the B&O installed a few thousand M-15 cars with fish belly steel center sills  in the years just before these M-18 arrived with truss rods and a steel center sill.

#180177 is an M-13 class built in 1906.

#165685 is an M-12 class built in 1902

#175399 is an M-15d class built in 1922-23. They were built new with wood roofs, an oddity for new cars the 1920s.

Another M-18 class car, 172513, appears in the second image.

The last image covers the area between the first and third images, and features the Northern Banana and ART reefers. On the left we see the well-weathered M-15d from teh first image. On the right is M-18 #172513. Of interest are two gondolas lurking on back tracks that seem to be delivering coal to a couple dealer trucks. B&O 257952 is an O-27b built in 1929. This is one of a few thousand USRA copies the B&O installed in the 1920s. Note the corrugated ends are different from the USRA ends.

The other gondola is an L&N steel gondola with drop doors, one of 9000 built in the 1920s and coming soon as an HO scale resin kit.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 05/02/2021 10:00 AM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi Gary and List Members,

I especially like the mini-scene with the two gondolas carrying coal. A bit difficult to discern, but looks to my eyes it looks like there is a work crew of at least two men in the gon L&N 51098, bent over like they are shoveling the coal. Note the A C Jones coal trucks parked directly next to to the gon. An entirely modelable scene for any size railroad, don't you think? It appears the B&O 257952 gon is also involved in the same operation

My Dec 1930 ORER sez the following about L&N 51098: series 50000-56499, 40ft 6in IL, 100000 lb, 6448 cars,  MCB type GA

My memory sez MCB type GA is a drop bottom gon, is that right? In that case, are the drop doors being used by the crew to help in unloading, or are they just using the shovels to toss the coal over the gon sides and into the truck beds? Thoughts? I checked B&O 257952, it is type GM (mill gon) which I think would NOT have drop doors of any sort...

Claus Schlund


Photo: NC&StL Livestock Car 26127

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: NC&StL Livestock Car 26127

Photo from the Pullman Library:

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-N-Q/i-3Q24sX5/buy

Built 3-1923.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photos: PRR Covered Hoppers

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: PRR Covered Hoppers

Photos from the Pullman Library:

257482

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-N-Q/i-qjZZLjN/buy

257759

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-N-Q/i-zQq8kCS/buy

257864

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-N-Q/i-2hDCcwZ/buy\

Click on the photos twice for maximum enlargement.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


L&N 51098 (was NRC Banana Reefer)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Gary and List Members,
 
I especially like the mini-scene with the two gondolas carrying coal. A bit difficult to discern, but looks to my eyes it looks like there is a work crew of at least two men in the gon L&N 51098, bent over like they are shoveling the coal. Note the A C Jones coal trucks parked directly next to to the gon. An entirely modelable scene for any size railroad, don't you think? It appears the B&O 257952 gon is also involved in the same operation
 
My Dec 1930 ORER sez the following about L&N 51098: series 50000-56499, 40ft 6in IL, 100000 lb, 6448 cars,  MCB type GA
 
My memory sez MCB type GA is a drop bottom gon, is that right? In that case, are the drop doors being used by the crew to help in unloading, or are they just using the shovels to toss the coal over the gon sides and into the truck beds? Thoughts? I checked B&O 257952, it is type GM (mill gon) which I think would NOT have drop doors of any sort...
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
To: 'stmfc'
Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2021 11:18 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] NRC Banana Reefer

It sure is dirty:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/51123193132/in/album-72157718970883282/ 

 

The B&O boxcar appears to have had many wood pieces replaced in its roof.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: Railroad Men's Club

Mike Settle
 

It was an expensive share of stock, too. 100 dollars in 1925 is equivalent to just a little over 1500 dollars today.


Re: Army Flatcars

 

Forgot to color correct.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...>
Date: Sunday, May 2, 2021 at 9:56 AM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Army Flatcars

 

I found a similar car in Kaiserslautern when I was serving in the Army in 1979.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, May 1, 2021 at 10:55 PM
To: realSTMFC <realstmfc@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Army Flatcars

 

They have the huge brake wheel on the side of the car and what appear to be end buffers:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49210936658/in/album-72157712179496252/ 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: Army Flatcars

 

I found a similar car in Kaiserslautern when I was serving in the Army in 1979.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, May 1, 2021 at 10:55 PM
To: realSTMFC <realstmfc@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Army Flatcars

 

They have the huge brake wheel on the side of the car and what appear to be end buffers:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49210936658/in/album-72157712179496252/ 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: flat on flat WWII

Lee
 

Notice the letters in Russian and CCCP marking.....


Re: Railroad Men's Club

Bill Parks
 

On Sun, May 2, 2021 at 10:14 AM, Doug Paasch wrote:
This is pure guesswork but I heard somewhere long ago that all members of a club are considered "owners" of the club and can be held personally liable for any actions against the club, such as injury lawsuits, etc.  Perhaps by incorporating the club, it was now a corporate entity and members are now just stockholders rather than actual owners of the club in order to hide behind a corporate shield???  I could be totally off here though
Doug - 

That is probably why the incorporated.  Even today non-profits incorporate (NMRA for an example) thus providing a legal shield for the members (among other reasons).  It is possible 100 years ago, Florida required stock to be issued for any "corporation".
 
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Railroad Men's Club

BillM
 

A thought is as some have said a social club. Private “social” clubs were a way to get around blue laws or other ordinances like dry counties. Just a thought.

Bill Michael

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Parks via groups.io
Sent: May 1, 2021 1:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Railroad Men's Club

 

In cleaning out my parent's house, we came across a stock certificate (see below) for the Railroad Men's Club that my grandfather bought (1 share for $100) in 1925 when he was working for the Seaboard Airline in Jacksonville.

I've done a Google search, but can not find any information about this organization.  Does anyone know anything about it?

Thanks in advance.




--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


folding brake gear

kevinhlafferty
 

Three views of what I believe to be a Barber design folding brake wheel for drop end gondolas 1932.
https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-pVn8SG7/A
https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-M74jqh6/A
https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-FCkN57k/A

Kevin Lafferty


Re: Railroad Men's Club

Doug Paasch
 

This is pure guesswork but I heard somewhere long ago that all members of a club are considered "owners" of the club and can be held personally liable for any actions against the club, such as injury lawsuits, etc.  Perhaps by incorporating the club, it was now a corporate entity and members are now just stockholders rather than actual owners of the club in order to hide behind a corporate shield???  I could be totally off here though.

Doug Paasch


On Sun, May 2, 2021, 8:04 AM Bill Parks via groups.io <BPARKS_43=YAHOO.COM@groups.io> wrote:
Kevin - 

Thanks for the feedback.  I did some more digging last night and came the same conclusion.  These were probably local social clubs that may have had some support (official or unofficial) from the railroads.  I also found on EBay (when all else fails, search there) where someone is selling a page dated late 1800s that showed a Railroad Men's Club that was built by the Vanderbilts for their employees.

As a former stock broker, I found it a bit odd that a non-profit would issue an actual stock certificate.  Looking at it, this is not something someone decided to just print up so you can show you're a member.  It has all the legal jargon and seals, and appear that everything was registered with the state under existing incorporation laws of the day. Like you, I have never seen a private club do this.  Normally, you pay an initiation fee, then on-going dues.  At the same time he joined this club, my grandfather was the secretary for the German-American Club in Jacksonville, and documents we have relating to that indicate just initiation fees and dues.  No mention of "stock".  I'm wondering if some lawyer talked the Railroad Club into doing it this way.  A question we may never know the answer to.

This has given me the idea of possibly creating stock certificates for the operating group I'm in.  Might make a fun Christmas present.

This is an interesting piece of railroad history, and hopefully one not totally lost to time.

As an aside, my grandfather grew up on a farm and believed only in investing in real estate.  I remember him saying many times that if you can't go and physically see what you own, and run your fingers through the dirt, then don't buy it, and through out his life, he always owned multiple rental properties.  Given that, this is probably the only "stock" certificate he ever put his name one (my grandmother, on the other hand, played the market and did quite well).

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: Railroad Men's Club

Bill Parks
 

Kevin - 

Thanks for the feedback.  I did some more digging last night and came the same conclusion.  These were probably local social clubs that may have had some support (official or unofficial) from the railroads.  I also found on EBay (when all else fails, search there) where someone is selling a page dated late 1800s that showed a Railroad Men's Club that was built by the Vanderbilts for their employees.

As a former stock broker, I found it a bit odd that a non-profit would issue an actual stock certificate.  Looking at it, this is not something someone decided to just print up so you can show you're a member.  It has all the legal jargon and seals, and appear that everything was registered with the state under existing incorporation laws of the day. Like you, I have never seen a private club do this.  Normally, you pay an initiation fee, then on-going dues.  At the same time he joined this club, my grandfather was the secretary for the German-American Club in Jacksonville, and documents we have relating to that indicate just initiation fees and dues.  No mention of "stock".  I'm wondering if some lawyer talked the Railroad Club into doing it this way.  A question we may never know the answer to.

This has given me the idea of possibly creating stock certificates for the operating group I'm in.  Might make a fun Christmas present.

This is an interesting piece of railroad history, and hopefully one not totally lost to time.

As an aside, my grandfather grew up on a farm and believed only in investing in real estate.  I remember him saying many times that if you can't go and physically see what you own, and run your fingers through the dirt, then don't buy it, and through out his life, he always owned multiple rental properties.  Given that, this is probably the only "stock" certificate he ever put his name one (my grandmother, on the other hand, played the market and did quite well).

--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


Re: More unloading firetrucks

Allen Cain
 

Richard, could you share what you are doing?

Allen Cain

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.

Brian Carlson
 

Many/most of the x32s were at the yard at the Pennsy freight station. 
I got the impression the film was early 40’s since none of the freight equipment appears beat from the war effort. (I could be totally wrong)

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 2, 2021, at 8:56 AM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


Yes,

And in the second view, you see a multi-dome wine tank car.

Note that the "many" PRR arch roof boxcars consists of 2 X31F cars and then what appears to be a yard FULL of X32, 50' cars. To see so many of those cars in one location is very interesting. It may mean that they are in storage, or assigned service. Given the uncertain date of the film, it may also be that they represent X32s being collected for use as troop sleepers, or, having finished that service, being returned to that service... although the Philly location makes that less likely.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 2, 2021 7:26 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Interestingly, it's both times the same run - seemingly filmed with two cameras which were positioned differently.
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954
 
Gesendet: Sonntag, 02. Mai 2021 um 03:07 Uhr
Von: "John Mateyko" <rattler21@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Philadelphia 1940’s video.
Also shows many PRR versions of the wagon top box car.  John

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