Date   

Re: CB&Q box car questions

Nelson Moyer
 

CB&Q #81 trucks were Barber S-2 stabilized.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of O Fenton Wells
Sent: Monday, May 3, 2021 10:59 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] CB&Q box car questions

 

Clark according to my Burlington Bulletin the 32000 was an XM 32 and had AAR double Truss trucks and the 17000-17799 was an X32B and had A-3 ride control trucks.  17800-18399 was also an XM 32B and had a type 81 truck but if there is an explanation for this truck in the Bulletin, I missed it.  The truck looks like a Barber Stabilized truck.  But I will never qualify as a freight car truck expert

Just say'in

Fenton

 

 

On Mon, May 3, 2021 at 11:37 AM Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:

I recently picked up two RTR CB&Q box cars. One Intermountain 32000 series and one Branchline Trains 17000 series. I don’t have a lot of info on these cars and would like to make them as correct as I can.

 

The BLT car may be good, except for the trucks that ‘might’ be ASF Ride Control A-3s?

 

Looks like the IM car needs a wood running board, 8 rung ladders and possible P2K trucks?

 

If these assumptions are correct, I would like to know what hand brakes would be appropriate.

 

Thanks,

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


 

--

Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Truck spotting- was CB&Q box car questions

Andy Carlson
 

The sheer knowledge, accompanied with huge willingness to help, makes this io group especially great. Our own truck specialist, Brian Leppert helped me years ago quickly ID the two most common post war freight car trucks--the ACF A-3 and the Barber Stabilized S-2.

1st) look for the triangular wedges inside the edges of the bolster. Both trucks show this and quickly notes that these are one of the Big-Two players.
2) If the coil spring perches remain fairly close to the truck side frame--then this is a Barber S-2
3) If the spring perches swell out promonently from the side frame--this is an ACF Rice Control A-3

This bit of quick truck spotting has helped me a lot when looking at vintage photos which aren't always in sharp focus or exposed very well. There may be some mis-identification, but with the huge amounts of both of the subject trucks used this is a good numbers game in truck I.D.ing.
Thanks, Brian!

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

.................. The truck looks like a Barber Stabilized truck.  But I will never qualify as a freight car truck expert
Just say'in
Fenton


The BLT car may be good, except for the trucks that ‘might’ be ASF Ride Control A-3s?
 




Photo: Chemical Vessel On Southern And L&N HD Flatcars

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Chemical Vessel On Southern And L&N HD Flatcars

Photo from the Pullman Library:

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-GjXMwgB/A

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Load For The Golden Gate Bridge

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Load For The Golden Gate Bridge

Photo from the Pullman Library:

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-sN4R8X3/buy

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: SWPX Tank Car 202 (Shawinigan Chemicals)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: SWPX Tank Car 202 (Shawinigan Chemicals)

Photo from the Pullman Library:

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-fnQtkRS/buy

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

Built 8-1933. AAR Class 201-A35

Aluminum tank.

Info on the company from the ‘net:

“The Shawinigan Carbide Company, forerunner of Shawinigan Chemicals Limited, was established in 1901 by Thomas Leopold "Carbide" Willson, who invented the carbide manufacturing process in 1892. The plant was sited at Shawinigan Falls, Quebec, in order to take advantage of surplus electric power produced by Shawinigan Water and Power Company, itself established in 1898. In 1909 SWPC gained a controlling interest in Shawinigan Carbide Company and in other Willson companies, and in 1911 reorganized them as the Canada Carbide Company. In 1915 SWPC established the Canadian Electro Products Company to manufacture acetone and other products for the British war effort. With the loss of its markets in 1918, the new company directed its research facilities to the development of chemicals for civilian consumption; thenceforth the company and its successors based their production heavily on original research. In 1927 Canadian Electro Products and Canada Carbide Company were amalgamated as Shawinigan Chemicals Limited.”

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Frisco Boxcar 32066

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Frisco Boxcar 32066

Photo from the Pullman Library:

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-8fS4tcS/buy

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

Built 4-1930. Photo taken in 1955 or later.

Appears this car received replacement steel sheathing.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Reading Gondola 34372 With Load

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Reading Gondola 34372 With Load

Photo from the Pullman Library:

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-R-S/i-73FkDFv/buy

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

Ingots I assume. Not sure why the load is not braced.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Railroad Men's Club

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, May 2, 2021 at 08:51 AM, Mike Settle wrote:
It was an expensive share of stock, too. 100 dollars in 1925 is equivalent to just a little over 1500 dollars today.
The thought occurs to me that this organization may have owned lodging in some major terminals, and the payment was for pre-paid lodging. Incorporation is governed by state laws; I seem to recall some states allowed Not-for-profits to sell shares.

Dennis Storzek


Re: CB&Q box car questions

O Fenton Wells
 

Clark according to my Burlington Bulletin the 32000 was an XM 32 and had AAR double Truss trucks and the 17000-17799 was an X32B and had A-3 ride control trucks.  17800-18399 was also an XM 32B and had a type 81 truck but if there is an explanation for this truck in the Bulletin, I missed it.  The truck looks like a Barber Stabilized truck.  But I will never qualify as a freight car truck expert
Just say'in
Fenton


On Mon, May 3, 2021 at 11:37 AM Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:
I recently picked up two RTR CB&Q box cars. One Intermountain 32000 series and one Branchline Trains 17000 series. I don’t have a lot of info on these cars and would like to make them as correct as I can.
 
The BLT car may be good, except for the trucks that ‘might’ be ASF Ride Control A-3s?
 
Looks like the IM car needs a wood running board, 8 rung ladders and possible P2K trucks?
 
If these assumptions are correct, I would like to know what hand brakes would be appropriate.
 
Thanks,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


CB&Q box car questions

Clark Propst
 

I recently picked up two RTR CB&Q box cars. One Intermountain 32000 series and one Branchline Trains 17000 series. I don’t have a lot of info on these cars and would like to make them as correct as I can.
 
The BLT car may be good, except for the trucks that ‘might’ be ASF Ride Control A-3s?
 
Looks like the IM car needs a wood running board, 8 rung ladders and possible P2K trucks?
 
If these assumptions are correct, I would like to know what hand brakes would be appropriate.
 
Thanks,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


UNION PACIFIC BOX CAR COLOR

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

My "Go To" color for UP freight cars has been either Floquil or Scalecooat OXIDE RED.  Thus is the correct color for cars in the 1940's with yellow lettering.  I seem to recall hearing that cars in the 1930's with white lettering  used a shade with some brown in it.  Can anyone confirm this and if so recommend a Floquil or Scalecoat mix?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Bill Pardie


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Photo: What A Pair (No, Not That!)

mopacfirst
 

Maybe because those two are both 'do not hump'?

That WECX car, built 1-61, is what we would now call a Schnabel car.  Was this terminology used then, or called something else in English at that time?  Schnabel = beak, as in bird.

Ron Merrick


Re: SP Freight Car Color.

John Barry
 

Chris,

Definitely post war. I don't recall precisely the date that ACL started with the conspicuoty markings but I think it was around 1950. The Santa Fe car looks like it is in the post '47 redder shade of Santa Fe Brown. It is a Bx-46 rebuilt from a Bx-9 or 10 1945-46.

Good color comparison for mid fifties modelers.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 




On Saturday, May 1, 2021, 09:41:46 AM EDT, Chris Barkan <cplbarkan@...> wrote:


Attached is a photo of boxcars from five different roads, NH, B&O, ACL, SP and ATSF, lined up on what looks like a team track in Dallas, TX.  I don't know the exact year or photographer but it offers a nice comparison of these road's various freight car colors in comparison to the SP, and to one another.
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

Bruce Smith
 

Phillip,

Yes, you do need to be careful around grain. Grain dust is highly explosive so limiting dust and sparks are really very important.

FWIW, I think 5 minutes to unpoad a 50' car is pretty fast considering it took 2 men around 45 minutes to unload a 5-' boxcar by hand...

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Philip Dove <philipdove22@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 2, 2021 4:11 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
In 1997 I was in Thunder bay Canada standing on one of the docks. The other side of the water was a row of rail served silos and covered hopper cars were unloading I was very surprised it seemed to be taking about 5 minutes to unload a car measuring about 50' long, It would seem there is no really fast way of unloading grain even now. Are there any dangers connected with a build up of static electricity if all the grain pours out  rapidly in one direction? 

Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Wed, 28 Apr 2021 at 13:57, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:
Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.

It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.

One of these things would make a fabulous model.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain
A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:
Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA





Photo: What A Pair (No, Not That!)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: What A Pair (No, Not That!)

Photo from the Pullman Library:

https://pullman-lib.smugmug.com/Railroad-U-Z/i-sPZLztq/buy

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

How often to do see two somewhat rare freight cars coupled together?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: B&O Washington D.C. Freight Terminal 1956

Tim O'Connor
 


Is that a weathered Erie box car with the small yellow & black emblem?
Look above the B&O box cars in front, that's the car I mean.


On 5/1/2021 6:57 PM, Scott wrote:
Lot of neat weathering ideas in that photo!

Scott McDonald
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/51040509441/
--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Paint stripper

Steve Summers
 

Solvaset was 40% Glycol Ether PM 60% water.


On May 2, 2021, at 3:12 PM, John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:

I forgot, the new version of Walthers Solvaset no longer uses butyl cellosolve.  It doesn't work as well as the old Hobsco.


Re: Photo: Unloading Grain

Philip Dove
 

In 1997 I was in Thunder bay Canada standing on one of the docks. The other side of the water was a row of rail served silos and covered hopper cars were unloading I was very surprised it seemed to be taking about 5 minutes to unload a car measuring about 50' long, It would seem there is no really fast way of unloading grain even now. Are there any dangers connected with a build up of static electricity if all the grain pours out  rapidly in one direction? 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Wed, 28 Apr 2021 at 13:57, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:
Even in an age of low wages it must have been slow and expensive … otherwise there would have been no market for the large, elaborate, and obviously very expensive boxcar unloading machines. These things grabbed the entire boxcar, lifted it, tilted it, and rocked the entire car back and forth to pour the grain (or other commodity) out of the open door.

It’s not a lot different in principal to a coal-dumper, just a bit smaller, and does not completely invert the car (wouldn’t need to anyway, since box cars have roofs). It’s also not a one-shot operation like a coal dumper … the box car needed to be tipped back and forth a few times.

One of these things would make a fabulous model.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Apr 27, 2021, at 6:44 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

out of curiosity, has it ever been mentioned how many people were
required and how long it took to
manually unload a boxcar loaded with
grain?
thanks
mel perry

On Tue, Apr 27, 2021, 1:46 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Good photo showing the use of a “power” shovel. Note the pulley on the lower edge of the photo and the man holding the cable used to pull the shovel, via an overhead winch or motor. There should be two pulley’s, one near each edge of the door, allowing for the “shovel” to be pulled from either end of the car as the inside man is unloading. The third man in the bibs is holding a sampling cup, used to take a sample of the grain for testing purposes.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 12:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Grain

 

Photo: Unloading Grain
A photo from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Libraries:
Click on the arrows and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
As in other recent photos, hard manual labor. The man in center possibly there to sample the grain.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA





Re: L&N 51098 (was NRC Banana Reefer)

ROGER HINMAN
 

I can’t read the number on the NRC reefer, but based on the hatch platforms it appears to be one of the 500 cars they leased from IC and would be in the NRC10000-10999 series. Roger Hinman


On May 2, 2021, at 1:15 PM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Claus, 

That image is one of four 1932 Dayton Union Station photos recently added to the Barriger Flickr site. Here's the link to review all four. 

There's some overlap to the images. The first on that page is a great shot featuring an amazing look at seven B&O freight cars, all of different classes. After downloading the largest image and futzing around with some Photoshoppery, I was able to determine several car numbers. From left to right, here's the breakdown.

#265xxx is one of the original M-26 class cars built in 1925.

M-24 USRA single-sheathed car. The B&O was assigned only 500 of these cars.

#194938 is an M-15a class automobile boxcar built in 1912.

#172247 is an M-18 class car built in 1916. This class is an oddity to me as the B&O installed a few thousand M-15 cars with fish belly steel center sills  in the years just before these M-18 arrived with truss rods and a steel center sill.

#180177 is an M-13 class built in 1906.

#165685 is an M-12 class built in 1902

#175399 is an M-15d class built in 1922-23. They were built new with wood roofs, an oddity for new cars the 1920s.

Another M-18 class car, 172513, appears in the second image.

The last image covers the area between the first and third images, and features the Northern Banana and ART reefers. On the left we see the well-weathered M-15d from teh first image. On the right is M-18 #172513. Of interest are two gondolas lurking on back tracks that seem to be delivering coal to a couple dealer trucks. B&O 257952 is an O-27b built in 1929. This is one of a few thousand USRA copies the B&O installed in the 1920s. Note the corrugated ends are different from the USRA ends.

The other gondola is an L&N steel gondola with drop doors, one of 9000 built in the 1920s and coming soon as an HO scale resin kit.


Eric Hansmann 
Murfreesboro, TN


On 05/02/2021 10:00 AM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi Gary and List Members,

I especially like the mini-scene with the two gondolas carrying coal. A bit difficult to discern, but looks to my eyes it looks like there is a work crew of at least two men in the gon L&N 51098, bent over like they are shoveling the coal. Note the A C Jones coal trucks parked directly next to to the gon. An entirely modelable scene for any size railroad, don't you think? It appears the B&O 257952 gon is also involved in the same operation

My Dec 1930 ORER sez the following about L&N 51098: series 50000-56499, 40ft 6in IL, 100000 lb, 6448 cars,  MCB type GA

My memory sez MCB type GA is a drop bottom gon, is that right? In that case, are the drop doors being used by the crew to help in unloading, or are they just using the shovels to toss the coal over the gon sides and into the truck beds? Thoughts? I checked B&O 257952, it is type GM (mill gon) which I think would NOT have drop doors of any sort...

Claus Schlund



Re: Paint stripper

John Sykes III
 

I forgot, the new version of Walthers Solvaset no longer uses butyl cellosolve.  It doesn't work as well as the old Hobsco.

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