Date   

Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Resemble Grease

Brian Stokes
 

Vallejo makes some great weathering effects that resemble all kinds of grease and grime. I have a few that I have been experimenting with for journal boxes, etc. 

--
Brian Stokes
North Point Street in Proto:48


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Garth and List Members,
 
I made a visit to the Sierra Railroad at Jamestown during the late 1990s. I saw at least one of these cars, could even still read the GREAT NORTHERN road name on it, and I did wonder what the car was doing there. Now I know - thanks.
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 07, 2021 7:48 AM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Friends,

While scanning up prints from my collection, I happened upon this view of the Yosemite Portland Cement Co. incline at Emory, California. I snapped the photo around 1967, and it shows the grade down from the loading bins near the top of the mountain. Recent photos posted online show this hasn't changed much, except the roof on the bin house is now gone. 

O.K., this isn't a freight car, but wait Grasshopper, and all shall be revealed.

The YPCCo. went into business in the 1920s. It's quarries were located atop this mountain above the Merced River on the Yosemite Valley Railroad. The stone was lowered to the YV via this double-track incline. From here the YV hauled the limestone to kilns near Merced, California, where the stone was burned to make cement. There is a nice web site with photos at http://memorableplaces.com/yvrr/CEMENT/YPCo.Blind.html . In 1944 the whole company was sold to Henry J. Kaiser (yes, the Liberty Ship guy). He immediately dismantled the kilns and other machinery which were sold to a concern in Venezuela. It isn't clear if any equipment from the Emory quarries also went to Venezuela, or if it was just scrapped. Kaiser is said to have bought the YPCCo. just to eliminate a competitor, though that may just be bad PR. It is possible the quarries were nearly played out, or that the YPCCo. was becoming unprofitable due to the quarry location and shipping costs.

In any case, with the timber operations that fed the YV gone and automobiles cutting into their passenger traffic even before WWII, the loss of the limestone traffic was the last straw for the YV. The line shut down a few months later.

O.K. Here come the freight cars. The YV owned a small fleet of ex-Great Northern ore cars to cover the limestone traffic. There were, IIRC, 50 cars in this fleet. The Sierra Railroad bought some of these, and several are still at Jamestown on display at Railtown 1897, and one more in Sacramento at the CSRM (in hideous orange paint when I last saw it, though the cars seem to have been black on the Sierra). A few others were cast off to other shortlines for maintenance-of-way purposes. Without a detailed roster I can't say if they were sold directly by the YV or its scrappers to these other lines, or were for a time they were owned by the SRR. McCloud River Railroad had several, Amador Central owned two, and the Yreka Western had at least one, though as my father's photo shows, this car still had the GN side walkways, and may have come directly to the YW from the GN. How these got from the YV to the buyers with their archbar trucks circa 1945 is a head scratcher, but possibly the cars had variances for one-time moves.

Westerfield offers this kit in several road names, including the VY as their 3452. It is still in their catalog.

Maybe Jack Burgess will want to chime in here, as the YV is his special interest and I may have garbled some things in this summary.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Re: New HO scale freight car kits

Ken Soroos
 

Yes, Matt.  The kit includes the as-built Pullman-Standard lettering for Soo Line (and DSS&A for the other kit).

Ken Soroos

On May 7, 2021, at 8:39 AM, Matthew Hurst <handbt33@...> wrote:

Any chance that Soo line car has 1940s era lettering included? 

Just wondering. 

Thanks

Matthew Hurst



On May 7, 2021, at 8:32 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


Resin Car Works has released a couple new HO scale freight car kits. The release announcement for the L&N steel gondola and Soo/DSS&A boxcar kits is posted on the RCW blog.


Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy



Re: New HO scale freight car kits

Matthew Hurst
 

Any chance that Soo line car has 1940s era lettering included? 

Just wondering. 

Thanks

Matthew Hurst



On May 7, 2021, at 8:32 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


Resin Car Works has released a couple new HO scale freight car kits. The release announcement for the L&N steel gondola and Soo/DSS&A boxcar kits is posted on the RCW blog.


Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


New HO scale freight car kits

Eric Hansmann
 

Resin Car Works has released a couple new HO scale freight car kits. The release announcement for the L&N steel gondola and Soo/DSS&A boxcar kits is posted on the RCW blog.


Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Friends,

While scanning up prints from my collection, I happened upon this view of the Yosemite Portland Cement Co. incline at Emory, California. I snapped the photo around 1967, and it shows the grade down from the loading bins near the top of the mountain. Recent photos posted online show this hasn't changed much, except the roof on the bin house is now gone. 

O.K., this isn't a freight car, but wait Grasshopper, and all shall be revealed.

The YPCCo. went into business in the 1920s. It's quarries were located atop this mountain above the Merced River on the Yosemite Valley Railroad. The stone was lowered to the YV via this double-track incline. From here the YV hauled the limestone to kilns near Merced, California, where the stone was burned to make cement. There is a nice web site with photos at http://memorableplaces.com/yvrr/CEMENT/YPCo.Blind.html . In 1944 the whole company was sold to Henry J. Kaiser (yes, the Liberty Ship guy). He immediately dismantled the kilns and other machinery which were sold to a concern in Venezuela. It isn't clear if any equipment from the Emory quarries also went to Venezuela, or if it was just scrapped. Kaiser is said to have bought the YPCCo. just to eliminate a competitor, though that may just be bad PR. It is possible the quarries were nearly played out, or that the YPCCo. was becoming unprofitable due to the quarry location and shipping costs.

In any case, with the timber operations that fed the YV gone and automobiles cutting into their passenger traffic even before WWII, the loss of the limestone traffic was the last straw for the YV. The line shut down a few months later.

O.K. Here come the freight cars. The YV owned a small fleet of ex-Great Northern ore cars to cover the limestone traffic. There were, IIRC, 50 cars in this fleet. The Sierra Railroad bought some of these, and several are still at Jamestown on display at Railtown 1897, and one more in Sacramento at the CSRM (in hideous orange paint when I last saw it, though the cars seem to have been black on the Sierra). A few others were cast off to other shortlines for maintenance-of-way purposes. Without a detailed roster I can't say if they were sold directly by the YV or its scrappers to these other lines, or were for a time they were owned by the SRR. McCloud River Railroad had several, Amador Central owned two, and the Yreka Western had at least one, though as my father's photo shows, this car still had the GN side walkways, and may have come directly to the YW from the GN. How these got from the YV to the buyers with their archbar trucks circa 1945 is a head scratcher, but possibly the cars had variances for one-time moves.

Westerfield offers this kit in several road names, including the VY as their 3452. It is still in their catalog.

Maybe Jack Burgess will want to chime in here, as the YV is his special interest and I may have garbled some things in this summary.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


array of cars at the Lehigh Portland Cement Company, Mitchell, Indiana 1920s

David
 

The NKP box still has its original NEW weight stencil.

The two LPCX hoppers are the channel-side design that AC&F developed circa 1905 and built in quantity for the next few years. Southern received several thousand, and the longest-lasting were the Huntington & Broad Top Mountain cars.

David Thompson


Re: Photo: Unloading Coal From A Boxcar

np328
 

   I'll be presenting on the subject at Collinsville and do not care to give too much away however will say the following: 
1) The consignee has always been allowed to specify what type of car they want the shipment made in. I have copies of letter internal to my railroads traffic department regarding where shipments were refused because they came in the wrong car.  
2) Commenting on the original comment "small amount of coal", a 1x12 can be placed in a boxcar on edge and several grades of coal shipped, all within one car. With gons or hoppers, sheets of plywood might be used to separate grades of coal ordered. 
3)  A boxcar gave protection from the weather. Coal is always slacking or put another way, generating heat as a byproduct of oxygenation. "Losing its calorific value" as David wrote prior and even with gasoline this happens as there are products today to help store gas in lawnmowers, snowblowers. (That slacking was how many railroad wooden coal towers burnt. The coal fines became compacted at the bottom of the bins and in some cases, spontaneously starting burning when sufficient heat was generated.) 
    In a lessor manner, if snow fell on the coal it could be melted in initial contact with the coal, then refreeze as more snow covered the coal and the BTUs needed to melt to ice now formed then overcame the meager BTUs the slacking produced. Another internal telegram sent by a very angry roundhouse foreman related how several men with long metal spikes were needed for a full shift to break the frozen coal away from a hoppers discharge chutes after this had happened at a roundhouse powerplant.   
4) Theft prevention, the equivalent of a modern gas filling station drive away.  
                                                                                                                                                                                            Jim Dick - Roseville, MN                                                              


Re: Resemble Grease

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Jim,

I have used Polly Scale acrylic or a craft brand of acrylic: the color I have used is nearly black - mixed as black with a bit of brown or dark red added, and I blend it outward from the switch point area into the neighboring rail, ballast and ties. 

I usually work from photos if at all possible, so I airbrush the flex track that I use with a mix that is close to the predominant tie color, and paint the sides of the rail, all surfaces of guard rails and most surfaces of turnout frogs a color that matches the predominant rail color once the track is installed.  After all this, and after the turnouts are installed and the ballast is down, then I will paint the point area of turnouts, since this is a detail.  If you use joint bars cemented to the side of the rails, check photos for their color, as it often varies from the rail color.

Todd Sullivan


Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Resemble Grease

Bruce Smith
 

Oily black (I have PolyScale, which is OOP, but there are others)
Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Jim Sabol <jimsabol@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 6, 2021 7:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Resemble Grease
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Guys, what product (paint, stain, blackener, . . . ) would best represent the greasy look under the switch points of a well maintained turnout; or around journal boxes, for that matter? Thanks.


Re: USRA composite gon, probably W&LE, road number is 51329, Atlanta IN 1929

Eric Hansmann
 

Most likely is a W&LE car. This one still has wood sheathing. The Wheeling began replacing the wood with sheet steel in 1925-26 on their USRA coal gondolas. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On May 6, 2021, at 5:41 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi List Members,
 
A USRA composite gon, probably W&LE, road number is 51329, Atlanta IN 1929
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Resemble Grease

Jim Sabol
 

Guys, what product (paint, stain, blackener, . . . ) would best represent the greasy look under the switch points of a well maintained turnout; or around journal boxes, for that matter? Thanks.


Re: Photo: Unloading Coal From A Boxcar

Philip Dove
 

I beleive the large lumps of coal have been made into a rough wall so that smaller coal can be shovelled into the gap in the middle. the large lumps would have been moved by hand, they are too big for a shovel. If you look closely you can see smaller 2 or 3" lumps on the guys shovel. In December 2000 i saw similar size trucks in China loaded in this style. The biggest piece of coal I saw that day ( or any other) was about 4'long and approaching 12" square in section. A wall had been built of large lumps of coal then inside the wall were put smaller bits. Keeping coal in larger bits as long as possible is considered desirable, I think it somehow stops the coal losing calorific value. A concern when loading ships with coal from railway cars on Tyneside, England was always to stop the coal breaking into small bits or dust.  Building a wall of coal on the back of a truck is not a very safe way of carrying the coal as bits frequently fall off.

Virus-free. www.avast.com


array of cars at the Lehigh Portland Cement Company, Mitchell, Indiana 1920s

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
An interesting array of cars at the Lehigh Portland Cement Company, Mitchell, Indiana 1920s
 
From left to right, I see...
 
TP&W box
NKP auto box
SOU hopper
D&H box
CH&D box
LPCX hoppers (2 of them)
SOO box
ACL ventilated box
Possibly another boxcar in the shadows beyond
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


USRA composite gon, probably W&LE, road number is 51329, Atlanta IN 1929

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
A USRA composite gon, probably W&LE, road number is 51329, Atlanta IN 1929
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Accuracy Of The Official Railway Equipment Registers - car rebuilding

Dennis Storzek
 

Ken, 

You are off by about twelve or fifteen years. The last large group of wood framed, SUF boxcars were the USRA DS cars, and they weren't built until 1918-19. They were just coming due for rebuilding in the mid thirties, and are the reason for the development of the Youngstown Steel Door Co. pre-fab car sides. Once those proved themselves, some roads used them to rebuild their steel framed USRA single sheathed cars, not so much because that design was deficient, but to get larger cars.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Accuracy Of The Official Railway Equipment Registers - car rebuilding

akerboomk
 

Another possible reason that car rebuilding declined in the late 1920s is that the “all wood”, steel centersill, and (possibly) SUF cars started getting retired.

As all-steel cars came along, there was less NEED to rebuild large numbers of cars every few years.

Although I’m sure the tax laws / economics were the larger influence on behavior.


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: PRR 12259, a class X23 boxcar, at Kewanna IN in 1910

akerboomk
 

Love that “jog” in the track around the semaphore ? (train order?) signal


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: PRR 12259, a class X23 boxcar, at Kewanna IN in 1910

lrkdbn
 

I think they're off on the date- the first X23 was in 1912, and most were built in 1913.By 1915 they were building the all steel X25.
Larry King


Re: Accuracy Of The Official Railway Equipment Registers

spsalso
 

And, after the "remodeled" building is complete and signed off, you can apply for a permit to replace that crappy old wall.


Ed

Edward Sutorik

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