Date   

Re: putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

Craig Zeni
 

My first choice is to cut carefully enough to avoid putty; if I can get the joint tight so that when apply styrene cement that some softened plastic smooshes up from the joint, that usually means no filler needed.  But.. 

Squadron shrinks.  Tamiya is good stuff, the Mr Hobby Mr White Putty is excellent.  In the past I've used Dupont Blue Acryl auto putty - great stuff.  Mr Hobby also makes Mr Dissolved Putty.  It's a styrene soup/goop like Tim described.  Great stuff and to my mind superior to tube putty as it's harder than tube putty so it sands like the surrounding plastic.


Re: putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

Nelson Moyer
 

Does Bondo shrink when it dries? Can it handle expansion and contraction without cracking? I’m looking of a product to fill in the irregularities in a 0.080 in. styrene backdrop splice where I put too much pressure on the splice plate behind the butt joint, creating a slight trough on either side of the splice plate when viewed from the front of the backdrop.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of O Fenton Wells
Sent: Monday, May 17, 2021 10:27 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

 

I use a Bondo auto putty from WalMart.  I know all the purists will poo poo this but it works for me and it lasts a long time.

Just say'in

Fenton

 


Re: putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

Tim O'Connor
 


I have done 'finish work' with both thin CA, and liquid clear acrylic (e.g. Future) which can nicely
fill in some of the shrinkage cracks that result after the putty dries. Applied in thin layers with a fine
brush.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/17/2021 11:48 AM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io wrote:
The problem I have had with most putties is that they shrink as they dry.  So it's like doing drywall (sheetrock) mud work: add some, sand some, add some, sand some ... repeat.  I used to use something named Liquid Steel, since it seemed to have smaller shrinkage.  Not sure if it is available nowadays.

Todd Sullivan

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

Tim O'Connor
 

Steve

George Bishop (Accupaint/Accucals) used to do this as well. You can layer this as well to create
reasonably large structures. He built up an entire "nose section" for a turbo train model he made and
it was perfectly sculpted, solid polystyrene when he was finished.

n-Butyl Acetate is good for bonding ABS plastics, so that's good to know about the Tamiya. :-)

Tim O'Connor


On 5/17/2021 11:42 AM, Steve Summers via groups.io wrote:
I make my own putty by dissolving leftover styrene sprues in n-Butyl Acetate (Tamiya extra thin cement is 50% Acetone 50% n-Butyl Acetate).  You can also use MEK to dissolve but it dries a little faster and can ‘string’ easier.  The advantage is the putty when dry is just styrene and with a little effort you can find and use any color styrene sprues.  Cut the sprues into small pieces, put in an old cleaned paint bottle, add liquid to cover the sprues.  You can add more sprues to thicken or more likely, add more liquid when it is too thick or ‘strings’.  Works very well on styrene models as the putty files, sands, and paints just like the model parts.



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

Todd Sullivan
 

The problem I have had with most putties is that they shrink as they dry.  So it's like doing drywall (sheetrock) mud work: add some, sand some, add some, sand some ... repeat.  I used to use something named Liquid Steel, since it seemed to have smaller shrinkage.  Not sure if it is available nowadays.

Todd Sullivan


Re: putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

Steve Summers
 

I make my own putty by dissolving leftover styrene sprues in n-Butyl Acetate (Tamiya extra thin cement is 50% Acetone 50% n-Butyl Acetate).  You can also use MEK to dissolve but it dries a little faster and can ‘string’ easier.  The advantage is the putty when dry is just styrene and with a little effort you can find and use any color styrene sprues.  Cut the sprues into small pieces, put in an old cleaned paint bottle, add liquid to cover the sprues.  You can add more sprues to thicken or more likely, add more liquid when it is too thick or ‘strings’.  Works very well on styrene models as the putty files, sands, and paints just like the model parts.


On May 17, 2021, at 11:30 AM, Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...> wrote:


I've used all three. I like the spot putty best, but it is black.  Be sure to prime the model or the black may affect your finish color. 

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 05/17/2021 9:14 AM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi List Members,
 
It has been a few years since I did a project that needed any putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model.
 
When I pulled out my favorite tube of putty (labeled "TAMIYA PUTTY BASIC TYPE") I found it had hardened up like a rock inside the tube!
 
Oh well, I thought. I don't like Squadron putty nearly as much, but I do have a tube already and so guess I will have to use it. I opened my tube labeled SQUADRON FAST DRYING WHITE PUTTY and it is also hardened, altho not as badly as the Tamiya putty.
 
Clearly I'm gonna have to buy a new tube of some kind of putty, so I'm looking for ideas regarding what other people use. Do you have a favorite? Pluses and minuses of each? Any help regarding gotchas and/or techniques? How about using automotive spot putty from a big box store - something like Bondo glazing and spot putty - does anyone use that?
 
Opinions...
 
Thanks in advance for your thoughts on the topic
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

Scott H. Haycock
 

I've used all three. I like the spot putty best, but it is black.  Be sure to prime the model or the black may affect your finish color. 

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 05/17/2021 9:14 AM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi List Members,
 
It has been a few years since I did a project that needed any putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model.
 
When I pulled out my favorite tube of putty (labeled "TAMIYA PUTTY BASIC TYPE") I found it had hardened up like a rock inside the tube!
 
Oh well, I thought. I don't like Squadron putty nearly as much, but I do have a tube already and so guess I will have to use it. I opened my tube labeled SQUADRON FAST DRYING WHITE PUTTY and it is also hardened, altho not as badly as the Tamiya putty.
 
Clearly I'm gonna have to buy a new tube of some kind of putty, so I'm looking for ideas regarding what other people use. Do you have a favorite? Pluses and minuses of each? Any help regarding gotchas and/or techniques? How about using automotive spot putty from a big box store - something like Bondo glazing and spot putty - does anyone use that?
 
Opinions...
 
Thanks in advance for your thoughts on the topic
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

O Fenton Wells
 

I use a Bondo auto putty from WalMart.  I know all the purists will poo poo this but it works for me and it lasts a long time.
Just say'in
Fenton

On Mon, May 17, 2021 at 11:14 AM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
It has been a few years since I did a project that needed any putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model.
 
When I pulled out my favorite tube of putty (labeled "TAMIYA PUTTY BASIC TYPE") I found it had hardened up like a rock inside the tube!
 
Oh well, I thought. I don't like Squadron putty nearly as much, but I do have a tube already and so guess I will have to use it. I opened my tube labeled SQUADRON FAST DRYING WHITE PUTTY and it is also hardened, altho not as badly as the Tamiya putty.
 
Clearly I'm gonna have to buy a new tube of some kind of putty, so I'm looking for ideas regarding what other people use. Do you have a favorite? Pluses and minuses of each? Any help regarding gotchas and/or techniques? How about using automotive spot putty from a big box store - something like Bondo glazing and spot putty - does anyone use that?
 
Opinions...
 
Thanks in advance for your thoughts on the topic
 
Claus Schlund
 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
It has been a few years since I did a project that needed any putty to smooth a joint between two sections of a plastic model.
 
When I pulled out my favorite tube of putty (labeled "TAMIYA PUTTY BASIC TYPE") I found it had hardened up like a rock inside the tube!
 
Oh well, I thought. I don't like Squadron putty nearly as much, but I do have a tube already and so guess I will have to use it. I opened my tube labeled SQUADRON FAST DRYING WHITE PUTTY and it is also hardened, altho not as badly as the Tamiya putty.
 
Clearly I'm gonna have to buy a new tube of some kind of putty, so I'm looking for ideas regarding what other people use. Do you have a favorite? Pluses and minuses of each? Any help regarding gotchas and/or techniques? How about using automotive spot putty from a big box store - something like Bondo glazing and spot putty - does anyone use that?
 
Opinions...
 
Thanks in advance for your thoughts on the topic
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

John Riddell
 

The Algoma Central & Hudson Bay Railway bought 200 of these cars in 1900 new from Pressed Steel Car Co. In 1916 the AC&HB purchased an additional 100 second-hand from the Duluth & Iron Range. One of the 300 cars is preserved restored in the Canadian Railway Museum at St. Constant, Quebec.

 

John Riddell

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: C&O 21920 twin hopper

Eric Hansmann
 

After downloading and adjusting image levels in Photoshop, a 1925 weigh date stencil is visible.

 

The centered end posts and brake platform, and the different grab/handhold ladders on the corners make this an interesting prototype. I just modified a couple Bowser GLa hoppers to mimic the centered end posts. It was pretty easy.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 6:51 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] C&O 21920 twin hopper

 

Hi List Members,

 

C&O 21920 twin hopper

 

The web site thinks the date to be "ca. 1930-1940", but I think I see a 1925 date on the side of the car.

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


C&O 40842 steel gon NEW 7-30 with coal load

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
C&O 40842 steel gon NEW 7-30 with coal load
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


A set of C&O hoppers (undated)...

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
A set of C&O hoppers (undated)...
 
I can identify C&O twin hoppers 57915 and 56808. The two cars appear to be of identical construction other than the trucks. They are from C&O series 50000-58999, 50-ton capacity.
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: VGN 10269 hopper end view circa 1946

Eric Hansmann
 

Neat shot. Those reporting marks on the car end are definitely retouched. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On May 16, 2021, at 7:00 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi List Members,
 
VGN 10269 hopper end view circa 1946
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Konker Hand Brake

Lester Breuer
 

When reviewing a MILW 36’ stock car diagram for number series 104570 - 105006 , class SM, built in 1927 by Ryan Car Co. in a MILW 1937 Shop Diagrams book I found the diagram states a “konker hand brake” installed.  I have no knowledge of this brake or have I been able to find any information regarding it. Does anyone have data or can direct me to a source to learn, maybe see a photo or diagram, of this type brake.

Thank You for your time and effort to help in advance.
Lester Breuer


Re: C&O 33503 - a steel hopper bottom gon - with coal load (undated)

Mark Rossiter
 

There just might be enough room in that car for another lump or two of coal.  I suspect if you were to build a model that looked like this you would receive a few raised eyebrows with the accompanying scoffs and scorns.

 

Mark Rossiter

 

 


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Jim Betz
 

Rich,
  That does look like a former GN car.  That pic, according to the details, was
taken on the McCloud RR ... but there is some connection with the Lane
County Historical Museum (which is in Oregon).  I see the number - but it
is not 'placed' where most GN ore cars had their numbers.  However, this
is one of the early GN ore cars and I don't know if they wore their marks
on the frame like the later ones did.
  Those standing boards along the sides were used during unloading iron
ore in the winter.  The unloading crew had long steam probes they thrust
into the ore to unfreeze it.  That is also the reason for those 5 oblong holes
which allowed access to the lower part of the load.  Iron ore often comes
out of the ground quite wet and stays that way long enough that it
freezes in the Minnesota winters.  I remember seeing a picture of one of
the ore yards that had long strings of steam engines ("out of service")
that were being used to provide steam to ore unloading.
  As with the GN cars on the Yosemite - these former ore cars were used
in a variety of services, ballast, coal, etc. The GN sold them when they
received improved ore cars - I think the major improvement was larger
capacity.  Even those newer cars had extensions put on them for the
taconite service in the later years (taconite is lighter than "raw" iron ore).
                                                                                                 - Jim


Re: 1952 image of a reefer at Montgomery Storage Philadelphia PA

Mike Smeltzer
 

Tim, are you sure those are doors and not reinforced ends?  


Sent from the all new AOL app for iOS

On Sunday, April 4, 2021, 4:54 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Yes it is a BAR ex-MDT reefer - But it appears that the BAR added access doors
on the end of this car! I have never seen good photos of their ends unfortunately. Some
of the ex-MDT cars had steel ends, which makes me wonder how many of the cars
had modified ends.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/4/2021 5:34 PM, Claus Schlund wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Nice 1952 image of a reefer at Montgomery Storage Philadelphia PA. The reefer side appears to be painted in a two color scheme, and has a herald but I do not recognize it right away. Is this a BAR reefer?
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: WM twin hopper in consist chalk-marked as NO BRAKE (undated)

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, May 16, 2021 at 04:18 PM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
WM twin hopper in consist chalk-marked as NO BRAKE (undated)
 
Hope it's not going too far..
Actually going far, in a train, is not a problem, as the other cars will have brakes. Note the NO BRAKE notation isn't on the side, where the carmen could see it, but rather on the end. It's a warning for any brakeman who thinks he's going to drop a cut of cars and control them with the handbrake to pick another car to ride.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Richard Wilkens
 

Here is one of the former GN ore cars on the McCloud River Railroad.

https://lchm.pastperfectonline.com/photo/517EDD6F-0DE0-4255-BBD0-795760046419

Looks like GN 83548 and looks like while last on the GN it was stenciled "Company Coal Service Only.

Rich Wilkens

5381 - 5400 of 189789