Date   

Re: Shipping Bulk Cement - not on the RR?

Clark Propst
 

Here in Iowa trucks were not allowed to haul from cement plants until 1960. In other words cement plants only shipped by rail. I do have a photo of guys emptying bags at a readi-mix facility. How common was that? 
If trucks were allowed into cement plants before that date in other states one would need to know when the type of trailer used to haul cement was in universal use? Late 50s? More questions...

Clark propst


Re: ACR Side Construction

Bill Kelly
 


Find the January 1987, vol 3 number 1 issue of the UPHS magazine, _The Streamliner_. There is a very good article by Frank Peacock titled "Box and Autocar Nomenclature". This is the first publication of his term "ACR" along with many others.
Later,
Bill Kelly 
 
Tim wrote:

Randy

ACR was a solution that arose when railroads chose to use thinner copper bearing steel side
sheets (Cor-Ten steel) that were not as rigid as the thicker conventional side sheets. The UP
obviously felt the weight savings was worth the extra cost, while some like the SP only used it
for some cars and then dropped it. (The Cor-Ten side sheets required an extra vertical stiffener.)

As for the terminology, I don't know who coined it. :-)

Tim O'Connor


On 6/5/2021 11:01 AM, Randy Hammill wrote:
I don’t know the answer to that, but a I do wonder where the term ACR came from. Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?

I suppose I should go digging through CBCs when I get home.

Randy



Re: Shipping Bulk Cement - not on the RR?

John Sykes III
 

Same as today, by bulk hopper truck.


Re: PLASTIC CEMENTS

Randy Hammill
 

I’ve been using Styrene Tack-it II

https://www.amazon.com/Tenax-Styrene-II-Single-Ounce-Bottles/dp/B07NCC2FDG/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=styrene+tack-it+ii&qid=1622995629&sprefix=styrene+tack&sr=8-3

Supposedly it’s a reverse engineered Tenax 7R made better. It works well, which is all I really care about.

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Re: PLASTIC CEMENTS

Randy Hammill
 

I use Aleene’s for a lot. Gluing down my track, for example. It is a bit flexible when dried, I use it for gluing etched running boards on plastic models.

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

Kenneth Montero
 

Tim (and others on this list),
 
Is there a single source that lists the "almost dead-on right" Athearn cars - hopefully, including:
-- the prototype to which the model is "almost dead-on right",
-- what are the errors ?
 
If not, I will be glad to put together such a list if folks will let me know:
-- the prototype from which the Athearn model is patterned,
-- what are the errors (and if any of them are complete foobies - the location of air brake appliances being one of them - as opposed to the wrong appliance or feature) , and
-- if known and readily found, a source for the correct information for that prototype.
.
See attached for what I have started.
 
This information would be helpful for kitbashing purposes. since Athearn cars often get used for kitbashing.
 
Ken Montero

On 06/06/2021 10:11 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
 
 

Very close to dead on right. But the major error is the MIRROR IMAGE roof ! Oops.

The *almost* dead-on right award goes to several Athearn models including the R-40-23
reefer, the 40 foot all steel box car, and a few others.

Tim O'Connor


On 6/6/2021 3:14 AM, John Sykes III via groups.io wrote:
Union Pacific class S-40-12.  This is one of the very few models that Athearn got dead-on right.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Shipping Bulk Cement - not on the RR?

Jim Betz
 

Hi,
  Although not directly related to the topic of this list - I have no other good
place to ask ...

  If you have a cement plant and it is shipping bagged in box cars and bulk
in hopper cars ... how did it ship to a local Concrete plant that was not
rail served?

  It seems to me its highly unlikely that they shipped bagged cement to a
ready mix plant that wasn't on an RR.  Do you know of such a plant and
how it got/gets its bulk cement?
                                                                                - Jim 


Re: PLASTIC CEMENTS

Armand Premo
 

don valentine

On Sunday, June 6, 2021, 08:58:40 AM EDT, John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii@...> wrote:


Aleene's Tacky Glue has a long and storied past.  Originally designed by 3M to glue blue foam insulation to plywood, it lost out in favor of tube-loaded products, such as Liquid Nails.  3M sold the rights for the product to the company that sells it as Aleene's Tacky Glue.  It works very well for gluing blue foam layers together for scenery, but I would not recommend it for gluing plastics like styrene since it is a surface adhesive and does not weld the parts together.  It needs a semi-porous surface to get a really good bond.  It will come loose from a non-porous surface as soon as it dries completely (learned that the hard way).  Other PVA glues, such as Pacer's Canopy Cement or MicroScale Kristal-Klear, are designed to remain flexible when dry and dries clear - making them perfect for gluing windows into structures or vehicles (and can be used to create small windows where acetate is not an option).


Re: Midland Terminal Ore Car identification

Kenneth Montero
 

The cars show that they were built in September of 1910, if that helps.
 
Ken Montero

On 06/03/2021 2:35 AM mmihalo763@... wrote:
 
 
From the mid 1930s on, the Midland Terminal RR of Colorado began building a collection of second hand steel hopper and gondola cars to replace their aged fleet of wood cars.   Among these cars were Ingoldsby Steel ore cars, likely from the Colorado & Southern that used them for iron ore movements from the Sunrise Mine in Wyoming, Rio Grande 36' GS drop bottom gondolas, Ralston steel drop bottom gondolas, and finally we come to this series of car.   Can anyone identify the possible origins of these cars?  They are reminiscent a cut down version of cars that were owned by the Nevada Northern.  Otherwise it looks like cars I've seen on the Copper Range, Tonopah & Tidewater and the Butte, Anaconda & Pacific.   These cars arrived in 1935 or so, and Mel McFarlands book on the line lists these cars as part of an order that came from the D&RGW for GS gons, which they very obviously aren't

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67485

https://digital.denverlibrary.org/digital/collection/p15330coll22/id/67487


Re: Speas Company 50ft car question.

 

Richter 1316

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Fritz Milhaupt via groups.io" <fmilhaupt@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, June 6, 2021 at 8:22 AM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Speas Company 50ft car question.

 

Richter Vinegar had four of these, painted school bus yellow, from the late 1960s until about 1980. They cycled between an apple processing facility in Scottville, Michigan (about ten miles east of Ludington) and the Richter plant in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Most of their trip was aboard one of the C&O car ferries across Lake Michigan.

They were RCVX 1316, 2316, 3316 and 4316.

- Fritz Milhaupt


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

Tim O'Connor
 


Very close to dead on right. But the major error is the MIRROR IMAGE roof ! Oops.

The *almost* dead-on right award goes to several Athearn models including the R-40-23
reefer, the 40 foot all steel box car, and a few others.

Tim O'Connor


On 6/6/2021 3:14 AM, John Sykes III via groups.io wrote:

Union Pacific class S-40-12.  This is one of the very few models that Athearn got dead-on right.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Speas Company 50ft car question.

Fritz Milhaupt
 

Richter Vinegar had four of these, painted school bus yellow, from the late 1960s until about 1980. They cycled between an apple processing facility in Scottville, Michigan (about ten miles east of Ludington) and the Richter plant in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Most of their trip was aboard one of the C&O car ferries across Lake Michigan.

They were RCVX 1316, 2316, 3316 and 4316.

- Fritz Milhaupt


Livestock Shipment on the Southern Railway in the 1920s

George Eichelberger
 

At one time, the Southern owned and moved a considerable number of stock cars. In addition to cattle, several hundred cars of horses and mules were sent to Pinners Point, VA for export to Spain immediately after WWI. Although there were people promoting the business inside the Southern, costs to handle, feed and deal with animals that died in transit made it a marginally profitable operation. (Fairfax Harrison raised and shipped cattle from his Virginia farm but did not think the revenue potential warranted large investments in facilities around the system.)

In June, 1922, he was asked, and denied, money to add pens at Ashburn, GA. The attached is one of the follow-on documents sent to him.

This is certainly an "unknown" topic that bears research and possible a TIES article? (The next work session at the archives at TVRM is June 18&19. Anyone (vaccinated!) is welcome to visit and help. Contact archives@... for Information or to let us know to expect you.

Ike


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

John Sykes III
 

Oops!  You're right.  The diagonal panels are reversed.


Re: PLASTIC CEMENTS

John Sykes III
 

Aleene's Tacky Glue has a long and storied past.  Originally designed by 3M to glue blue foam insulation to plywood, it lost out in favor of tube-loaded products, such as Liquid Nails.  3M sold the rights for the product to the company that sells it as Aleene's Tacky Glue.  It works very well for gluing blue foam layers together for scenery, but I would not recommend it for gluing plastics like styrene since it is a surface adhesive and does not weld the parts together.  It needs a semi-porous surface to get a really good bond.  It will come loose from a non-porous surface as soon as it dries completely (learned that the hard way).  Other PVA glues, such as Pacer's Canopy Cement or MicroScale Kristal-Klear, are designed to remain flexible when dry and dries clear - making them perfect for gluing windows into structures or vehicles (and can be used to create small windows where acetate is not an option).


Re: PLASTIC CEMENTS

John Mateyko
 

I have used(with good results) Aleene's.  I buy the smaller bottle as it will dry out over the years.  There is no strength to this product so it should not be used for 'pulling' surfaces.  However, it takes about five minutes to set so I have a few minutes to get things right.  It is also water soluble so a building assembled two years ago may be placed in water for a few minutes and taken apart.  It shows white while drying and within twenty-four hours is clear if you don't get off all the excess.  John Mateyko


Re: Rubberized Livestock Car Slats (1956)

akerboomk
 

RE: Cattle chewing on coating

Note the caption said the coating was tested “on 25 cars for 3 years”.

I’m assuming someone would notice if there was a problem with the cattle chewing on the coating over that time.

But you never know…

Ken


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

Paul Doggett
 

Garth 

You are correct they are cut backwards or the wrong way round.

Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿


On 6 Jun 2021, at 11:13, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


John,

Aren't the roof stiffening panels cut backwards? 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sun, Jun 6, 2021 at 3:19 AM John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Union Pacific class S-40-12.  This is one of the very few models that Athearn got dead-on right (but I think the brake gear has to be rearranged).


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

John,

Aren't the roof stiffening panels cut backwards? 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sun, Jun 6, 2021 at 3:19 AM John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Union Pacific class S-40-12.  This is one of the very few models that Athearn got dead-on right (but I think the brake gear has to be rearranged).


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

John Sykes III
 
Edited

Union Pacific class S-40-12.  This is one of the very few models that Athearn got dead-on right (but I think the brake gear has to be rearranged).

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