Date   

Re: PLASTIC CEMENTS

John Mateyko
 

I have used(with good results) Aleene's.  I buy the smaller bottle as it will dry out over the years.  There is no strength to this product so it should not be used for 'pulling' surfaces.  However, it takes about five minutes to set so I have a few minutes to get things right.  It is also water soluble so a building assembled two years ago may be placed in water for a few minutes and taken apart.  It shows white while drying and within twenty-four hours is clear if you don't get off all the excess.  John Mateyko


Re: Rubberized Livestock Car Slats (1956)

akerboomk
 

RE: Cattle chewing on coating

Note the caption said the coating was tested “on 25 cars for 3 years”.

I’m assuming someone would notice if there was a problem with the cattle chewing on the coating over that time.

But you never know…

Ken


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

Paul Doggett
 

Garth 

You are correct they are cut backwards or the wrong way round.

Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿


On 6 Jun 2021, at 11:13, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:


John,

Aren't the roof stiffening panels cut backwards? 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sun, Jun 6, 2021 at 3:19 AM John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Union Pacific class S-40-12.  This is one of the very few models that Athearn got dead-on right (but I think the brake gear has to be rearranged).


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

John,

Aren't the roof stiffening panels cut backwards? 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sun, Jun 6, 2021 at 3:19 AM John Sykes III via groups.io <johnsykesiii=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Union Pacific class S-40-12.  This is one of the very few models that Athearn got dead-on right (but I think the brake gear has to be rearranged).


Re: UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

John Sykes III
 
Edited

Union Pacific class S-40-12.  This is one of the very few models that Athearn got dead-on right (but I think the brake gear has to be rearranged).


Re: Speas Company 50ft car question.

Scott
 

Thanks Jack.  With that information I was able to Google more information on it.  Turns out there is a survivor car at IRM!  Pretty cool.

Thanks
Scott McDonald 


Re: Speas Company 50ft car question.

Jack Mullen
 

This is a former GPEX milk tank car, repurposed after milk traffic largely had left railroads. The Pfaudler glass-lined tanks for milk were also well suited to vinegar and wine, among other commodities.

Jack Mullen


Re: ACR Side Construction

Randy Hammill
 

Yes, I know why they have the extra rivets, just didn't know if there was an industry term. 

The 1943 CBC has a notation of a photo of 187085, noted as, "light weight construction." It also has another notation: Description, Railway Mechanical Engineer, October, 1939--Description of earlier lot, Class B50-21, Railway Mechanical Engineer, April 1938. I hadn't noticed such information before. For a D&RGW auto car it notes that it was described in Railway Age, January 13, 1940 and Railway Mechanical Engineer in February, 1940.

It also has two pictures that are reversed - 186028 has a caption that says it is of low-alloy high-tensile steel but is a picture of 186028, a welded car, and there's a picture of 193464 with a caption that says, "Welded construction," although it's clearly not as it's a car with ACR. Oops.

My suspicion is, "light weight construction," and, "low-allow high-tensile steel," will be reflected in those articles since the lighter weight was the selling point, not the fact that there were additional intermediate stiffeners required. Time to read RP Cyc 31-32 again a little more closely...

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Speas Company 50ft car question.

Scott
 

Hello,

Does anybody have any any information on the car in the link below?  I know Speas was a vinegar company in Kansas City.  Was this a more modern vinegar car with tanks in it?  The car appears to be aluminum.  Possibly just painted silver.  I cant zoom in enough to get any build dates off of it.

Speas Company Vinegar car

Thanks
Scott McDonald 


Re: Sunshine Kit for sale

csxt5555
 

Sorry it’s sold


On Jun 5, 2021, at 8:28 PM, Rick Naylor <thehobbystop@...> wrote:


Is the kit still available?


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of csxt5555 via groups.io <csxt5555@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 2, 2021 2:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Sunshine Kit for sale
 
I have one Sunshine kit 29.6 Western Railway of Alabama War Emergency boxcar.  Kit was opened to measure and scale.  65.00/flat rate shipping

Thanks
Kevin









Re: ACR Side Construction

Tim O'Connor
 


Terry Metcalfe's UP Freight Cars book (p 93) mentions that the B-50-24 construction saved
over 5,000 pounds over the B-50-19 and that the October 1939 issue of Railway Mechanical
Engineer has an extensive article on the cars. If someone has that issue of RME maybe we can
find out whether they had a name for this style of construction. :-)

Tim O'Connor



On 6/5/2021 2:37 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 08:01 AM, Randy Hammill wrote:
Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?
Has to be a modeler's term. On the prototype they'd be concerned with the structural member, not the attachment rivets.

Dennis Storzek

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Sunshine Kit for sale

Rick Naylor
 

Is the kit still available?


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of csxt5555 via groups.io <csxt5555@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 2, 2021 2:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Sunshine Kit for sale
 
I have one Sunshine kit 29.6 Western Railway of Alabama War Emergency boxcar.  Kit was opened to measure and scale.  65.00/flat rate shipping

Thanks
Kevin









Re: ACR Side Construction

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 08:01 AM, Randy Hammill wrote:
Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?
Has to be a modeler's term. On the prototype they'd be concerned with the structural member, not the attachment rivets.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Rubberized Livestock Car Slats (1956)

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 06:36 AM, Jim Betz wrote:
Cattle will eat/chew on anything in their reach.  Were these cars successful or
were they later reworked to remove the 'rubberized' coating?
I doubt they had to remove it; the cattle would take care of that :-)

The short text included with the image is interesting, in that it mentions hides "sticking" to the slats. I suspect the UP initially wanted to use steel slats to cut down on maintenance, and ran into the old tongue stuck to the flagpole problem during the winter; in extremely cold weather the sweaty flanks of the animals would freeze to the steel... inhumane and leaving the load damaged. So, the bed-liner was the solution. Likely enough survived the chewing to still be effective to keep the animals from "sticking."

Dennis Storzek


UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

Bob Chaparro
 

UP Livestock Car 47630D (Class Not Visible)

Photo from Don Strack’s UtahRails Website:

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Union-Pacific/UP-Freight-Cars/i-VCQBnhr/A

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Built 8-1950. Stencil notes “This Car Equipped With Roller Bearings”.

Journal lids appear to be painted silver, an indicator of roller bearings refitted to trucks that originally had solid bearings.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Photo: Bamberger Railroad Boxcar 800

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Bamberger Railroad Boxcar 800

A Wil Whittaker photo from Don Strack’s UtahRails website:

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Miscellaneous/i-zSwfB5J/A

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: ACR Side Construction

Tim O'Connor
 

Randy

ACR was a solution that arose when railroads chose to use thinner copper bearing steel side
sheets (Cor-Ten steel) that were not as rigid as the thicker conventional side sheets. The UP
obviously felt the weight savings was worth the extra cost, while some like the SP only used it
for some cars and then dropped it. (The Cor-Ten side sheets required an extra vertical stiffener.)

As for the terminology, I don't know who coined it. :-)

Tim O'Connor


On 6/5/2021 11:01 AM, Randy Hammill wrote:
I don’t know the answer to that, but a I do wonder where the term ACR came from. Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?

I suppose I should go digging through CBCs when I get home.

Randy

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: ACR Side Construction

Randy Hammill
 

I don’t know the answer to that, but a I do wonder where the term ACR came from. Was it an industry term or something coined by modelers/historians?

I suppose I should go digging through CBCs when I get home.

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Prototype Junction
http://prototypejunction.com

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954
http://newbritainstation.com


Re: Rubberized Livestock Car Slats (1956)

Jim Betz
 

Bob/anyone,
  Cattle will eat/chew on anything in their reach.  Were these cars successful or
were they later reworked to remove the 'rubberized' coating?
                                                                                                     - Jim


Re: New eBay listing

Jim Betz
 

Clark,
  What is the white square, oriented as a "diamond", on the door of this BAR car?
                                                       - Jim

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