Date   

Re: Photo: C&NW Livestock Car 14976 (1958)

Jack Mullen
 

It looks like there's a second deck fitted at the yellow/green division. Possibly a load of hogs?

Jack Mullen


Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Richard Townsend
 

You're right about the grain export facility. There still is a great deal of grain shipped out of Portland by sea. While there currently is a pipeline that comes down to Portland from the refineries on Puget Sound, I don't think it existed that long ago. Could be wrong, though.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 7, 2021 4:09 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] image of a bulk oil dealership

 
The large structure in the second photo looks like a grain export facility. If no nearby oil field, could it be an oil pipeline terminal?
 
This is fun!
Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent
On 08/07/2021 4:58 PM Richard Townsend via groups.io <richtownsend@...> wrote:
 
 
I'm skeptical about this. I could be wrong, but I don't think Oregon has ever had any oil fields of any size, especially in Portland. As for the denuded landscape, that's what Oregon was about for a long time: take all the trees. And this is in Portland, which even then was a sizeable city. The "pipe loads" look to me to be logs and cut lumber. My guess, and it is a guess, is that this facility, which I believe was riverside, received oil from tankers that have come up the Columbia River. Then the oil is loaded into tank cars for distribution around the state.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 7, 2021 3:40 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] image of a bulk oil dealership

Good point Tony!
 
I looked around this photo, and I think we're looking at a trans-loading facility for a developing oil field. And everything else is a storage depot and maintenance  facility. The whole area is denuded, thus the developing, and there are a lot of pipe loads in those gons in the background. There are also several tank car loading platforms between the tank rows.
Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent
On 08/07/2021 4:13 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
 
 
Claus Schlund wrote:
Nice image of a bulk oil dealership. Served by - you guessed it - steam era freight cars. Any thoughts regarding the date? The tank car, rail mounted crane, and the steel gons in the ditant background make me think 1920.
 
I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
 
Claus, what makes you think it’s a bulk oil dealership? The tanks are awfully big compared to the many, many photos I have seen of such dealerships in the steam era. The numerous wood barrels would also seem odd in that context. 
 
Tony Thompson
 
 


Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Scott H. Haycock
 

 
The large structure in the second photo looks like a grain export facility. If no nearby oil field, could it be an oil pipeline terminal?
 
This is fun!

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 08/07/2021 4:58 PM Richard Townsend via groups.io <richtownsend@...> wrote:
 
 
I'm skeptical about this. I could be wrong, but I don't think Oregon has ever had any oil fields of any size, especially in Portland. As for the denuded landscape, that's what Oregon was about for a long time: take all the trees. And this is in Portland, which even then was a sizeable city. The "pipe loads" look to me to be logs and cut lumber. My guess, and it is a guess, is that this facility, which I believe was riverside, received oil from tankers that have come up the Columbia River. Then the oil is loaded into tank cars for distribution around the state.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 7, 2021 3:40 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] image of a bulk oil dealership

Good point Tony!
 
I looked around this photo, and I think we're looking at a trans-loading facility for a developing oil field. And everything else is a storage depot and maintenance  facility. The whole area is denuded, thus the developing, and there are a lot of pipe loads in those gons in the background. There are also several tank car loading platforms between the tank rows.
Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent
On 08/07/2021 4:13 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
 
 
Claus Schlund wrote:
Nice image of a bulk oil dealership. Served by - you guessed it - steam era freight cars. Any thoughts regarding the date? The tank car, rail mounted crane, and the steel gons in the ditant background make me think 1920.
 
I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
 
Claus, what makes you think it’s a bulk oil dealership? The tanks are awfully big compared to the many, many photos I have seen of such dealerships in the steam era. The numerous wood barrels would also seem odd in that context. 
 
Tony Thompson
 
 


Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 


Hi everyone,
 
Thanks everyone for the insights - I stand enlightened!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Richard Townsend
 

I'm skeptical about this. I could be wrong, but I don't think Oregon has ever had any oil fields of any size, especially in Portland. As for the denuded landscape, that's what Oregon was about for a long time: take all the trees. And this is in Portland, which even then was a sizeable city. The "pipe loads" look to me to be logs and cut lumber. My guess, and it is a guess, is that this facility, which I believe was riverside, received oil from tankers that have come up the Columbia River. Then the oil is loaded into tank cars for distribution around the state.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Scott H. Haycock <shhaycock@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 7, 2021 3:40 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] image of a bulk oil dealership

Good point Tony!
 
I looked around this photo, and I think we're looking at a trans-loading facility for a developing oil field. And everything else is a storage depot and maintenance  facility. The whole area is denuded, thus the developing, and there are a lot of pipe loads in those gons in the background. There are also several tank car loading platforms between the tank rows.
Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent
On 08/07/2021 4:13 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
 
 
Claus Schlund wrote:
Nice image of a bulk oil dealership. Served by - you guessed it - steam era freight cars. Any thoughts regarding the date? The tank car, rail mounted crane, and the steel gons in the ditant background make me think 1920.
 
I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
 
Claus, what makes you think it’s a bulk oil dealership? The tanks are awfully big compared to the many, many photos I have seen of such dealerships in the steam era. The numerous wood barrels would also seem odd in that context. 
 
Tony Thompson
 


Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Scott H. Haycock
 

Thinking about this, I doubt there would have been any issue with petroleum products being shipped in barrels. But when industry in general switched from barrels to steel drums, the petroleum industry could have led the way. They might have even led the development.

More here: https://www.skolnik.com/blog/a-brief-history-of-the-55-gallon-drum/

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantment

On 08/07/2021 4:35 PM robert netzlof <rtnetzlof@...> wrote:


----- Original Message -----
From: "Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)" <claus@...>

I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
I have a book on oil refinery design (unfortunately concealed somewhere in The Dreaded Basement). It dates from pre-WW2 days, but how much before I don't recall. It might even have been published pre-WW1. (I got it in the mid 1960s from the local Goodwill store where it was in company with several texts and references in the civil and mechanical engineering area, apparently all contributed by the estate of a deceased engineer once employed in the petroleum refining business.)

One of the chapters was devoted to the design of facilities for manufacturing, filling, and repairing wooden barrels for use in distributing oil products. One part that sticks in my mind is the use of glue to line the barrels after they had been coopered. The general idea was to pour a quantity of hot glue into the barrel, plug the bung, then roll the barrel about on the floor to distribute the glue all over the interior followed by propping the barrel up over a pan to allow excess glue to drain out through the bung hole.

Recall that in the late 19th Century, there were barrel cars, some of which were owned and operated by Union Tank Line to transport empty barrels back to the refineries for re-use. Of course, those could have been steel barrels, if there were steel barrels in the late 19th Century.

--
Bob Netzlof a/k/a Sweet Old Bob



Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Dave Parker
 

The second photo clearly indicates that it is a pier in Portland, OR.  To me, the large tanks look like so many other "tank farms" (terminals) where refined petroleum products were brought in by boat, and sent out in tank cars. 

The trucks on the tank car (early Andrews?) and the assortment of parked vehicles suggest a date of 1930 or thereabouts (IMO).
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Scott H. Haycock
 

Good point Tony!
 
I looked around this photo, and I think we're looking at a trans-loading facility for a developing oil field. And everything else is a storage depot and maintenance  facility. The whole area is denuded, thus the developing, and there are a lot of pipe loads in those gons in the background. There are also several tank car loading platforms between the tank rows.

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 08/07/2021 4:13 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
 
 
Claus Schlund wrote:
Nice image of a bulk oil dealership. Served by - you guessed it - steam era freight cars. Any thoughts regarding the date? The tank car, rail mounted crane, and the steel gons in the ditant background make me think 1920.
 
I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
 
Claus, what makes you think it’s a bulk oil dealership? The tanks are awfully big compared to the many, many photos I have seen of such dealerships in the steam era. The numerous wood barrels would also seem odd in that context. 
 
Tony Thompson
 


Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

robert netzlof <rtnetzlof@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)" <claus@...>

I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
I have a book on oil refinery design (unfortunately concealed somewhere in The Dreaded Basement). It dates from pre-WW2 days, but how much before I don't recall. It might even have been published pre-WW1. (I got it in the mid 1960s from the local Goodwill store where it was in company with several texts and references in the civil and mechanical engineering area, apparently all contributed by the estate of a deceased engineer once employed in the petroleum refining business.)

One of the chapters was devoted to the design of facilities for manufacturing, filling, and repairing wooden barrels for use in distributing oil products. One part that sticks in my mind is the use of glue to line the barrels after they had been coopered. The general idea was to pour a quantity of hot glue into the barrel, plug the bung, then roll the barrel about on the floor to distribute the glue all over the interior followed by propping the barrel up over a pan to allow excess glue to drain out through the bung hole.

Recall that in the late 19th Century, there were barrel cars, some of which were owned and operated by Union Tank Line to transport empty barrels back to the refineries for re-use. Of course, those could have been steel barrels, if there were steel barrels in the late 19th Century.

--
Bob Netzlof a/k/a Sweet Old Bob


Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

A Clemens
 

Here's another view of this industry.
Described as " Terminal No. 4 -St. John's -Portland, OR" with no definitive date.


Al

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Sat, Aug 7, 2021 at 3:13 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
Claus Schlund wrote:

Nice image of a bulk oil dealership. Served by - you guessed it - steam era freight cars. Any thoughts regarding the date? The tank car, rail mounted crane, and the steel gons in the ditant background make me think 1920.
 
I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
 

Claus, what makes you think it’s a bulk oil dealership? The tanks are awfully big compared to the many, many photos I have seen of such dealerships in the steam era. The numerous wood barrels would also seem odd in that context. 

Tony Thompson



Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Tony Thompson
 

Claus Schlund wrote:

Nice image of a bulk oil dealership. Served by - you guessed it - steam era freight cars. Any thoughts regarding the date? The tank car, rail mounted crane, and the steel gons in the ditant background make me think 1920.
 
I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
 

Claus, what makes you think it’s a bulk oil dealership? The tanks are awfully big compared to the many, many photos I have seen of such dealerships in the steam era. The numerous wood barrels would also seem odd in that context. 

Tony Thompson



Re: image of a bulk oil dealership

Scott H. Haycock
 

Great photo!
 
If you ignore the background, it already looks like a photo from a model railroad. Every thing is so neat and tidy- like a scene waiting to be super-detailed. 
 
Could this be a brand new facility? 
 
As to the barrels, could the be lined, and contain more viscous materials, like greases? 

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 08/07/2021 2:09 PM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi List Members,
 
Nice image of a bulk oil dealership. Served by - you guessed it - steam era freight cars. Any thoughts regarding the date? The tank car, rail mounted crane, and the steel gons in the ditant background make me think 1920.
 
I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
 
 
This image would makes for a nice inspiration for a model railroad, don't you think?
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


image of a bulk oil dealership

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Nice image of a bulk oil dealership. Served by - you guessed it - steam era freight cars. Any thoughts regarding the date? The tank car, rail mounted crane, and the steel gons in the ditant background make me think 1920.
 
I note the use of wooden barrels at the oil dealership - I've never seen this before. Instead I always see steel barrels (drums?) even in the pre-1920 era.
 
 
This image would makes for a nice inspiration for a model railroad, don't you think?
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


KEWANEE BOILER SHiPPING PLACARD

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I am looking for a clear photo of the plackard that was placed on Kewanee boilers for shipment. I have a distant photo of the KEWANEE BOILER lettering, however there is some small script above and below this print.
I want to have some decals made up for my Multiscale boilers… I would be happy to share if this comes to fruition.

Thanks in advance:

Bill Pardie


Re: Photo: C&NW Livestock Car 14976 (1958)

Douglas Harding
 

Appears that it was lined with cardboard or contains boxes of some sort. If lined, it was used to shipped hogs in inclement weather. I have a photo of another CNW 14000 series stockcars showing the door covered with paper.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, August 7, 2021 11:12 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: C&NW Livestock Car 14976 (1958)

 

Photo: C&NW Livestock Car 14976 (1958)

A Jim Parker photo:

http://canadianfreightcargallery.ca/cgi-bin/image.pl?i=cnw14976&o=cnw

Any comments from C&NW followers?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: 37 Mod w/square corners

O Fenton Wells
 

Looking good Clark, Nicely done


On Sat, Aug 7, 2021 at 12:51 PM Clark Propst via groups.io <cepropst=q.com@groups.io> wrote:
Maybe you were able to pick up a Sunshine mini-kit for the IC version? Or maybe you were lucky enough to get the fine RCW kit? I’ve had both, did an IC car with the Martin’s, a DSSA with Frank’s. Now I’m doing a Soo Line version using Chad Boas ends. Five bucks ain’t bad! Add in some decals and a few extra parts and your in business.
 
I’ve attached a photo of the model before I primed it. Additional parts include A-Line sill steps and a bit of styrene for a trust plate on the body. On the ends there’s some Tichy straight grabs, a retainer valve from the parts bin w/a piece of thin wire for an air line, and a Tangent Klasing hand brake (gearbox and wheel sold separately).
The model has been primed with Tamiya G. Next I’ll paint the body and sides of the ends with a Tru-color BCR. Lastly, I’ll masked the end sides and airbrush on some Tru-color black...maybe some on the underframe too? Then K4 decals, Dullcote and weathering. Give me another day of two  ;  )) It’s amazing the flaws you see when viewing the photo you don’t see with your eye. If it didn’t have flaws it wouldn’t be mine ....

Clark Propst



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


O Scale SFRD Rr-27 Reefer 34652

Bob Chaparro
 

O Scale SFRD Rr-27 Reefer 34652

Available from Rails Unlimited:

http://railsunlimited.ribbonrail.com/Models/special.html

Scroll down to the bottom of the page.

This car was part of the series 34500-34950. These cars were rebuilt in 1939-40 from Classes Rr-W, -X, -Y, -2, -3 and -4. There were 451 rebuilt cars but without fans.

There were another 49 Rr-27 cars in series 4200-4248 rebuilt in 1940 from Classes Rr-W and -X. These 49 cars received fans in the rebuilding and the four- digit car numbers signify this.

For modeling purposes there were still 118 of the original 451 cars on the live list in 1971 and 11 of the 49 fan cars on the live list that same year.

I would suppose most of these cars received updated paint schemes beginning in 1947 and 1959 but I have no photographic evidence to confirm this for specific cars.

A 1940 photo of SFRD 34786 by Randall Mills from the University of Oregon Libraries:

https://oregondigital.org/catalog/oregondigital:df66xd06j

Note the curved line map, which is the original map style.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


37 Mod w/square corners

Clark Propst
 

Maybe you were able to pick up a Sunshine mini-kit for the IC version? Or maybe you were lucky enough to get the fine RCW kit? I’ve had both, did an IC car with the Martin’s, a DSSA with Frank’s. Now I’m doing a Soo Line version using Chad Boas ends. Five bucks ain’t bad! Add in some decals and a few extra parts and your in business.
 
I’ve attached a photo of the model before I primed it. Additional parts include A-Line sill steps and a bit of styrene for a trust plate on the body. On the ends there’s some Tichy straight grabs, a retainer valve from the parts bin w/a piece of thin wire for an air line, and a Tangent Klasing hand brake (gearbox and wheel sold separately).
The model has been primed with Tamiya G. Next I’ll paint the body and sides of the ends with a Tru-color BCR. Lastly, I’ll masked the end sides and airbrush on some Tru-color black...maybe some on the underframe too? Then K4 decals, Dullcote and weathering. Give me another day of two  ;  )) It’s amazing the flaws you see when viewing the photo you don’t see with your eye. If it didn’t have flaws it wouldn’t be mine ....

Clark Propst


Photo: C&NW Livestock Car 14976 (1958)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: C&NW Livestock Car 14976 (1958)

A Jim Parker photo:

http://canadianfreightcargallery.ca/cgi-bin/image.pl?i=cnw14976&o=cnw

Any comments from C&NW followers?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Cocoa Beach RPM

al_brown03
 

G'morning:

The "Bash at the Beach" returns January 6-8, 2022: with clinics, vendors, models on display, modular layouts, and Florida weather. For details, including prices and contact info, please see: http://prototyperails.com

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

9201 - 9220 of 195507