Date   

Re: more glue questions

Todd Sullivan
 

Yes, becaue that is the nature and characteristics of petro-based contact cements.  However, I have found that Barge Cement is less prone to 'string'.  I usually use a toothpick to apply the cement by gathering some on the toothpick, then rolling the toothpick to gather up any strings, then applying it to the part(s) to be cemented.  That has worked pretty well for me, and the bond seems to be stronger than GOO.

Todd Sullivan


Re: more glue questions

ed_mines
 

I always thought Barge cement was a "new & improved" form of Walthers goo.
Does it form filaments like goo does?


Re: more glue questions

ed_mines
 

indeed!


Subject: Westside Model ATSF No. 3013 2-10-2

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello Groups!

 

A friend has the subject HO model as surplus in his collection.  If you are a Santa Fe steam era modeler and need something to pull your freight cars, you might consider calling Nick D’Amore at 412-358-0286 to be first in line to claim this model.  You will find his asking price reasonable so don’t delay.

Nick will respond in the order of messages left on his phone and email.

Email is [njdamore@...].  Do not correspond with me.


Regards from Mike Schleigh in leafy Grove City, Penna.


Re: Using hoarded parts

 

Sow’s ear into a silk purse?

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Clark Propst via groups.io" <cepropst@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Friday, October 8, 2021 at 4:10 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Using hoarded parts

 

I have no memory of this model other than it was in my kit drawer. No Idea where it came from? It is a Intermountain PS-1 decorated for Milwaukee. The previous owner started building the kit, but stopped after whatever he was using for glue sucked/melted the bolster taps into the bolsters...Much of the plastic brake rigging was broken off too. I know just enough about PS-1s to be dangerous. At first I was going to make it a CGW 93000 series. These were some of the first PS-1s so there were changes needing to be made. I looked at the PS-1 list put together by Ed Hawkins and saw the KCS had some early cars too. Like any freight car modeler worth his salt I’m a parts hoarder. I happen to have a new center sill/bolster combo I ‘think’ is Branchline? I did use Branchline brake rigging, but had to shorten the long rods...snip, snip. I cut off the bolster tabs and replaced them with leftovers from a Yarmouth ATSF kit. I also shorten the cross member tabs too. One of the uncoupling lever brackets was broken off, used a couple scraps of styrene to fabricate a new one. I used Tangent eye bolts and will use their lever too. I only found a side view in an old RMJ. The corners were clean, no tabs and therefore required a couple different A-Line sill steps. There were three parts sprues in the box, thank goodness...I used side ladders on the ends as well, the inside stile was straight on these early cars. I made the bracket grab on the end by snipping the end off one and turning the cut bracket 90 degrees and gluing the parts back together on the model. The end sill grab is a Tichy wire one. Yarmouth placards were used on the ends, Tangent route car and placards boards were used on the doors. Not sure about the doors? They may have come in the kit? At least they fit either way. I’m out of Kato ASF ride control trucks, so am using MDC Fox trucks as shop trucks. Not seen in this photo is the roof. The sides bowed out in the middle so I added a couple bulkheads before gluing on a Tangent early PS-1 roof which I had to scrape off the plastic inside perimeter. I ‘plan’ to use a my ‘standard’ Kadee running board. I might take one more photo before painting. In the small b/w photo the entire car appears to be freight car color? Unless I hear otherwise I’ll paint it all one color, but not till next week. Busy weekend coming up...

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

 

 

 

 

 


Using hoarded parts

Clark Propst
 

I have no memory of this model other than it was in my kit drawer. No Idea where it came from? It is a Intermountain PS-1 decorated for Milwaukee. The previous owner started building the kit, but stopped after whatever he was using for glue sucked/melted the bolster taps into the bolsters...Much of the plastic brake rigging was broken off too. I know just enough about PS-1s to be dangerous. At first I was going to make it a CGW 93000 series. These were some of the first PS-1s so there were changes needing to be made. I looked at the PS-1 list put together by Ed Hawkins and saw the KCS had some early cars too. Like any freight car modeler worth his salt I’m a parts hoarder. I happen to have a new center sill/bolster combo I ‘think’ is Branchline? I did use Branchline brake rigging, but had to shorten the long rods...snip, snip. I cut off the bolster tabs and replaced them with leftovers from a Yarmouth ATSF kit. I also shorten the cross member tabs too. One of the uncoupling lever brackets was broken off, used a couple scraps of styrene to fabricate a new one. I used Tangent eye bolts and will use their lever too. I only found a side view in an old RMJ. The corners were clean, no tabs and therefore required a couple different A-Line sill steps. There were three parts sprues in the box, thank goodness...I used side ladders on the ends as well, the inside stile was straight on these early cars. I made the bracket grab on the end by snipping the end off one and turning the cut bracket 90 degrees and gluing the parts back together on the model. The end sill grab is a Tichy wire one. Yarmouth placards were used on the ends, Tangent route car and placards boards were used on the doors. Not sure about the doors? They may have come in the kit? At least they fit either way. I’m out of Kato ASF ride control trucks, so am using MDC Fox trucks as shop trucks. Not seen in this photo is the roof. The sides bowed out in the middle so I added a couple bulkheads before gluing on a Tangent early PS-1 roof which I had to scrape off the plastic inside perimeter. I ‘plan’ to use a my ‘standard’ Kadee running board. I might take one more photo before painting. In the small b/w photo the entire car appears to be freight car color? Unless I hear otherwise I’ll paint it all one color, but not till next week. Busy weekend coming up...
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


 

 

 

 


Re: Photo: NP Automobile Boxcar 4914 (End Door)

lrkdbn
 

Back in 1973, I was riding on a GTW caboose at Detroit MI. We stopped next to a NP War Emergency single sheath box car on the adjacent track (normal double track spacing) From that distance I was unable to determine if the car was wood sheathed or if it had been changed to steel sheet, as was sometimes seen on old cars in that era. No board joints or wood grain was visible.
Larry King


Re: Photo: NP Automobile Boxcar 4914 (End Door)

np328
 

These,
       and other classes of cars on the NP were constructed to deal with the then lucrative automobile trade (as noted by the lettering on the far end of the car.) NP officers noted that in order to play in the Detroit automobile market, empty cars needed to be placed at at areas just outside Detroit where they would be readily available. Of the Ford plant in St. Paul, MILW has always had a lock on that traffic. 
      Some (many) 50 footers of the NP with end doors were later rebuilt with solid ends as the end doors weaken the structural integrity of the shell and are prone to water leakage.  On the NP 30000 series, this happened as early as 10 years after being built. One of the side doors on each side were often also blanked off as for lumber loading and household goods loading, a single door worked fine.                                                                                                                                       
      Note in the photo how tight the wood is.             Until you read that statement, did this look like a wood sheathed car to you?  
                                                                                                                                                                                                              James Dick - Roseville, MN 


Re: Photo: H.P. Smith Paper Co. Reefer HPSX 100

Tim O'Connor
 


If the wax was paraffin, protection from heat may have been a consideration. But why not
just ship it in a tank car in liquid form?

Perhaps it was the cartons themselves (once coated with wax) that needed to be kept cold
before the milk was added.

Tim O'Connor


On 10/8/2021 10:13 AM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Fri, Oct 8, 2021 at 05:07 AM, Ray Hutchison wrote:
H.P. Smith is a division of James River Corporation engaged in the business of treating paper with a polyethylene coating for use as freezer wrap and the like. 
This link: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1985-05-22-8502010663-story.html
says that before the use of polyethylene, milk cartons were coated with wax. 1923 much predates polyethylene, so possibly the reefers were used for shipping the wax.

Dennis Storzek

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: more glue questions

Tim O'Connor
 


Barge Cement is a standard type of volatile contact cement. As such, it's great stuff !


On 10/7/2021 9:17 PM, Armand Premo via groups.io wrote:
The late Dr Denny Ansbach recommended Barge Cement for such purposes.For what it's worth.Armand Premo


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: NP Automobile Boxcar 4914 (End Door)

Bob Chaparro
 

Gene Deimling commented:
"These cars were built in 1930 by PC&F. I used that photo along with other to create the patterns for a 1/48 version."


Re: more glue questions

Todd Sullivan
 

I have used Barge Cement (blue tube) for several years, and really like its characteristics.  It is a useful member of my 'glue team'.  I found mine by ordering at an ACE hardware store.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: H.P. Smith Paper Co. Reefer HPSX 100

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Oct 8, 2021 at 05:07 AM, Ray Hutchison wrote:
H.P. Smith is a division of James River Corporation engaged in the business of treating paper with a polyethylene coating for use as freezer wrap and the like. 
This link: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1985-05-22-8502010663-story.html
says that before the use of polyethylene, milk cartons were coated with wax. 1923 much predates polyethylene, so possibly the reefers were used for shipping the wax.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photo: H.P. Smith Paper Co. Reefer HPSX 100

Ray Hutchison
 

From a court case:  

H.P. Smith is a division of James River Corporation engaged in the business of treating paper with a polyethylene coating for use as freezer wrap and the like. 


Photo: C.A. Burnette Co. Meat Reefer BACX 100 (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: C.A. Burnette Co. Meat Reefer BACX 100 (Undated)

Photo courtesy of the New York Central System Historical Society:

https://nycshs.omeka.net/items/show/130253

Another presumed meat reefer with latch bars for ventilation.

BACX reporting mark assigned to C.A. Burnette Co. Inc./Merchants Despatch Transportation Corp.

C. A. Burnette Co., 827 W. 22nd St., Chicago.

There also was a C.A. Burnett (no final “E”) Co. in Chicago. Confusing!

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Photo: NP Automobile Boxcar 4914 (End Door)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: NP Automobile Boxcar 4914 (End Door)

Photo from Classic Trains Magazine:

https://www.trains.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/20210930.jpg

Caption:

Northern Pacific no. 4914 is a 50-foot, single-sheathed, double-door car built in the late 1930s and shown here in 1940. Note the Dreadnaught end door. Jay Williams collection”

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: H.P. Smith Paper Co. Reefer HPSX 100

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: H.P. Smith Paper Co. Reefer HPSX 100

Photo courtesy of the New York Central System Historical Society:

https://nycshs.omeka.net/items/show/130249

Anyone know why a paper company would need an ice bunker refrigerator car?

Perhaps for chemicals used in paper making or saleable by-products?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: ERDX/A&P Tea Co. Reefer 12000

Bob Chaparro
 

But what about the latch bars for ventilation?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: more glue questions

Armand Premo
 

The late Dr Denny Ansbach recommended Barge Cement for such purposes.For what it's worth.Armand Premo


Re: SANTA FE BX 11 & 12's

Scott
 

I have seen photos of BX12s with raised roofs with plywood sides too.  Not sure how many got that treatment.

Scott McDonald 

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