Date   

Re: more glue questions/Barge cement

Scott H. Haycock
 

Most contact adhesives are solvent-based. I wouldn't use them on plastic models. You can buy water-based contact adhesives in cans, but I've not seen any in tubes, like Barge Cement.

Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent

On 10/09/2021 3:53 PM Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Tim,

Hmmm.  I appreciate your warning, but I have not had any problems with this.  Perhaps I've been lucky.  I do use quite small amounts of contact cement, usually when gluing roofs to body sides and ends.  Just enough contact cement to hold the roof on and in place until I can get the CA wicked into the seams. 

Todd Sullivan.


Re: more glue questions/Barge cement

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Tim,

Hmmm.  I appreciate your warning, but I have not had any problems with this.  Perhaps I've been lucky.  I do use quite small amounts of contact cement, usually when gluing roofs to body sides and ends.  Just enough contact cement to hold the roof on and in place until I can get the CA wicked into the seams. 

Todd Sullivan.


Re: more glue questions/Barge cement

np328
 

    Tim's comments on post 187715 in the second sentence are well founded.  I recall in experiences from an earlier club layout, a member who assembled out of Design Preservation Miniatures modular parts, a skyscraper  perhaps 10 stories high. He assembled it with Goo and for a few weeks it stood upright and square. Then after a while it developed a slight lean. Another member put his hands around it and set it straight again, only for the structure to lean again next week now in a different direction. 
     Strange thing was, there was no joint failure. The structure held together, even when one member jokingly gave it a lateral twist!   
Where the DPM panels were joined, the plastic became quite malleable in that if you would press a screwdriver point or even a fingernail into the plastic, it did not take much pressure to leave a lasting impression. I am not a chemist and can't say if it attacks other plastics (or resin) in a like manner however of the DPM material, it seemed to absorb the volatiles quite easily. I don't think the Goo ever completely set.                                                                                                                                           James Dick - Roseville, MN 


Re: Photo: C.A. Burnette Co. Meat Reefer BACX 100 (Undated)

ROGER HINMAN
 

Build date on BACX 100 was August 1934, same summer as the ERDX A&P cars were built; a lot of the A&P cars were later renumbered to BACX 4xx series in the late forties and were retired with those numbers. I have an unproven suspicion that BACX 100 was built to be MDT 156. Both sets of cars were ones that used older fish belly under frames with composite construction bodies.

Roger Hinman

On Oct 7, 2021, at 10:43 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: C.A. Burnette Co. Meat Reefer BACX 100 (Undated)
Photo courtesy of the New York Central System Historical Society:
Another presumed meat reefer with latch bars for ventilation.
BACX reporting mark assigned to C.A. Burnette Co. Inc./Merchants Despatch Transportation Corp.
C. A. Burnette Co., 827 W. 22nd St., Chicago.
There also was a C.A. Burnett (no final “E”) Co. in Chicago. Confusing!
Bob Chaparro
Moderator
Railway Bull Shippers Group


Re: Photo: ERDX/A&P Tea Co. Reefer 12000

ROGER HINMAN
 

Notice the vendor calls this a “hatch closure” assembly; it can be used to prop open the hatch for ventilation but it also serves to keep a closed cover secure


Roger Hinman




On Oct 7, 2021, at 10:38 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

But what about the latch bars for ventilation?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: more glue questions/Barge cement

Robert kirkham
 

It would be good to see a clinic on using mylar in these ways - (and, incidentally, on what forms and where to purchase it from.)

Rob

On Oct 9, 2021, at 7:42 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


All volatile contact cements including Goo --

apply to both parts. allow to dry to the touch (almost no tackiness). press together with force.
after a minute or so, forcible separation will result in destruction of the item. if the glued area is
small, you can 'unglue' (within a very short time period) by application of MEK with a brush

I learned about this from Jack Spencer who used contact cement to attach his sill steps which he
fabricated from MYLAR sheet! (thin, strong, flexible). He also made Mylar overlays for some
offset hopper cars he did, because the material could hold rivet impressions, is as thin as paper,
and could be glued with contact cement.

Tim O'Connor

On 10/9/2021 9:37 AM, Bud Rindfleisch wrote:
Todd,
Can the Barge be used other than as a contact cement? How about set time if used that way?
Thanks,
Bud Rindfleisch


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Photo: Burlington Rendering Co. Reefer CDRX 120

Douglas Harding
 

Packing house by products were used in making animal feed. Dog food is a good example, Strong Heart brand dog food was owned by the Morrell meat packing company. The mad cow disease scare of a few years ago was because of packing house by products being used in cattle feed. The disease was spread through the byproducts.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Horton Monroe
Sent: Saturday, October 9, 2021 12:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Burlington Rendering Co. Reefer CDRX 120

 

I'm kinda interested in what the phrase "Meat Scraps for Poultry" means...

Horton Monroe
Old Hickory, TN


Re: Photo: Burlington Rendering Co. Reefer CDRX 120

Dave Parker
 

It means what it seems to mean:  meat scraps for use in poultry feed. 

A few minutes with Google indicates that the practice is now frowned upon or even illegal in some countries (e.g. Australia).  But in the US, it is probably regulated at the state or local level, if at all.

Back in the era of this reefer, however, I suspect the practice was rather widespread.  Here's a little bit about it from 1921:

https://books.google.com/books?id=CAlIAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA75&lpg=PA75&dq=meat+scraps+as+poultry+feed+in+the+u.s.+today&source=bl&ots=KkgBj6dmVE&sig=ACfU3U1TvsOVCZy80bVhiklN16tNrxhgcA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiJu5-A7b3zAhWEFzQIHQELBpYQ6AF6BAgxEAM#v=onepage&q=meat%20scraps%20as%20poultry%20feed%20in%20the%20u.s.%20today&f=false
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: Burlington Rendering Co. Reefer CDRX 120

Horton Monroe
 

I'm kinda interested in what the phrase "Meat Scraps for Poultry" means...

Horton Monroe
Old Hickory, TN


Re: more glue questions

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Oct 8, 2021, at 16:08, ed_mines via groups.io <ed_mines=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I always thought Barge cement was a "new & improved" form of Walthers goo.
Does it form filaments like goo does?
As far as I know, barge cement predated Walthers, even Uncle Bill himself.
--
Artie the Hinged Jaw
Retired AFU Game Warden


Re: more glue questions/Barge cement

Tim O'Connor
 

Todd

It can be done but it's not recommended! Undried contact cement can attack the underlying material and
lead to joint failure or worse. People who fail to read the instructions for Goo often complain of the problems
they have with it.  😂

Hobby size corner brackets can hold items at a perfect 90 degree angle while the adhesive sets. I also use
small machinist squares (Micromark I think) for a quick 90 degree setup with CA.

On 10/9/2021 10:42 AM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io wrote:
Bud,

If you apply Barge to the two surfaces to be joined, let it dry, then press the two parts together, the joint will be very strong, but you have to get placement of the parts aligned correctly the first time, there's no second chance.

I have also applied Barge and then pressed the parts together.  It takes maybe 20 minutes for the joint to become strong.  I do this when assembling resin carbodies together, as I want some time to be able to align things properly, such as a roof on a body.  I used the Barge sparingly, then go back and apply CA along the joint once the parts are correctly lined up.

Todd Sullivan
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: more glue questions/Barge cement

Tim O'Connor
 

All volatile contact cements including Goo --

apply to both parts. allow to dry to the touch (almost no tackiness). press together with force.
after a minute or so, forcible separation will result in destruction of the item. if the glued area is
small, you can 'unglue' (within a very short time period) by application of MEK with a brush

I learned about this from Jack Spencer who used contact cement to attach his sill steps which he
fabricated from MYLAR sheet!  (thin, strong, flexible). He also made Mylar overlays for some
offset hopper cars he did, because the material could hold rivet impressions, is as thin as paper,
and could be glued with contact cement.

Tim O'Connor

On 10/9/2021 9:37 AM, Bud Rindfleisch wrote:
Todd,
    Can the Barge be used other than as a contact cement? How about set time if used that way?
     Thanks,
      Bud Rindfleisch
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: more glue questions/Barge cement

Todd Sullivan
 

Bud,

If you apply Barge to the two surfaces to be joined, let it dry, then press the two parts together, the joint will be very strong, but you have to get placement of the parts aligned correctly the first time, there's no second chance. 

I have also applied Barge and then pressed the parts together.  It takes maybe 20 minutes for the joint to become strong.  I do this when assembling resin carbodies together, as I want some time to be able to align things properly, such as a roof on a body.  I used the Barge sparingly, then go back and apply CA along the joint once the parts are correctly lined up.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: Burlington Rendering Co. Reefer CDRX 120

Eric Hansmann
 

This car wears an East Rochester (E.R.) weigh location and 7-30 weigh date. Below that line is a built date of 9-05. 

Interesting to see a 42,000 pound capacity. And check out those classic arch bar trucks. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Oct 8, 2021, at 8:33 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Burlington Rendering Co. Reefer CDRX 120

Photo courtesy of the New York Central System Historical Society:

https://nycshs.omeka.net/items/show/130291

CDRX reporting mark assigned to Consolidated Rendering Co./Burlington Rendering Co.

Company based in Vermont.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: more glue questions/Barge cement

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Todd,
    Can the Barge be used other than as a contact cement? How about set time if used that way?
     Thanks,
      Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Photo: H.P. Smith Paper Co. Reefer HPSX 100

Dave Parker
 

Why guess, when in the time it takes to type "invention of wax paper milk carton" plus about 10 seconds you have the answer?

(Hint:  it was wayyyy before 1940)

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: H.P. Smith Paper Co. Reefer HPSX 100

Philip Dove
 

I think the first waxed paper cartons for milk were made in the 1940s, invented by a dairy company in Sweden. Or were they just the inventors ofa new filling  process? They filled the cartons while they were one long tube, and sealed both ends afterwards! 
The reefer looks pre 1940s. Perhaps the reefer was part of the billboard reefer racket where just running refers was somehow profitable 


Photo: Burlington Rendering Co. Reefer CDRX 120

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Burlington Rendering Co. Reefer CDRX 120

Photo courtesy of the New York Central System Historical Society:

https://nycshs.omeka.net/items/show/130291

CDRX reporting mark assigned to Consolidated Rendering Co./Burlington Rendering Co.

Company based in Vermont.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Photo: Associated Packers Inc. Meat Reefer APAX 117 (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Associated Packers Inc. Meat Reefer APAX 117 (Undated)

Photo courtesy of the New York Central System Historical Society:

https://nycshs.omeka.net/items/show/130254

Chef brand poultry.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: Using hoarded parts

Tim O'Connor
 


Just one color? :-P

On 10/8/2021 5:10 PM, Clark Propst via groups.io wrote:
I have no memory of this model other than it was in my kit drawer. No Idea where it came from? It is a Intermountain PS-1 decorated for Milwaukee. The previous owner started building the kit, but stopped after whatever he was using for glue sucked/melted the bolster taps into the bolsters...Much of the plastic brake rigging was broken off too. I know just enough about PS-1s to be dangerous. At first I was going to make it a CGW 93000 series. These were some of the first PS-1s so there were changes needing to be made. I looked at the PS-1 list put together by Ed Hawkins and saw the KCS had some early cars too. Like any freight car modeler worth his salt I’m a parts hoarder. I happen to have a new center sill/bolster combo I ‘think’ is Branchline? I did use Branchline brake rigging, but had to shorten the long rods...snip, snip. I cut off the bolster tabs and replaced them with leftovers from a Yarmouth ATSF kit. I also shorten the cross member tabs too. One of the uncoupling lever brackets was broken off, used a couple scraps of styrene to fabricate a new one. I used Tangent eye bolts and will use their lever too. I only found a side view in an old RMJ. The corners were clean, no tabs and therefore required a couple different A-Line sill steps. There were three parts sprues in the box, thank goodness...I used side ladders on the ends as well, the inside stile was straight on these early cars. I made the bracket grab on the end by snipping the end off one and turning the cut bracket 90 degrees and gluing the parts back together on the model. The end sill grab is a Tichy wire one. Yarmouth placards were used on the ends, Tangent route car and placards boards were used on the doors. Not sure about the doors? They may have come in the kit? At least they fit either way. I’m out of Kato ASF ride control trucks, so am using MDC Fox trucks as shop trucks. Not seen in this photo is the roof. The sides bowed out in the middle so I added a couple bulkheads before gluing on a Tangent early PS-1 roof which I had to scrape off the plastic inside perimeter. I ‘plan’ to use a my ‘standard’ Kadee running board. I might take one more photo before painting. In the small b/w photo the entire car appears to be freight car color? Unless I hear otherwise I’ll paint it all one color, but not till next week. Busy weekend coming up...
Clark Propst

_

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

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