Date   

Re: GM&O 35200 Series Automobile Car

Paul Doggett
 

Geogre 
A fine build 
Paul Doggett 


On 23 Nov 2021, at 16:37, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:



George, there’s no question about you setting the bar for craftsmanship. You’ve produced another outstanding model that would be completely at home is a museum. Your work is a benchmark for all of us.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gtws00 via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] GM&O 35200 Series Automobile Car

 

I finally got around to completing the build of a GM&O 35200 series Auto Car. The starting point was a HO Scale Speedwitch Kit that included a Branchline Body and resin ends, doors, parts and decals.
I was fortunate to have picked this kit up from Ed Hawkins who also help me obtain General Arrangement and Brake Arrangement Drawings from the National Museum of Transportation in St Louis. After looking the drawings over 
I decided to scratchbuild a new accurate underframe. Along the way many items were scratched or modified for this car to better match the general arrangement drawings. An item that stalled my build were the somewhat unique10 rung ladders. Friend Jim King of Smoky Mountain Model Works came to the rescue and designed and printed ladders from the General Arrangement Drawings using an SLA 3D printer. The Side and end grabs and Equipco Brake Housing is also 3d printed by Jim. Attached are a couple of photos of the build showing the underframe, sides, ends and a couple of the finished car still to be weathered. Note that the underframe side sill is built up of two C Channels as per the drawings and the crossties nest in the c-channel.  A note on the end ladders is that the right-hand stile is a flat piece of steel and not L-shaped as the other side. The flat piece has bends in it that allow for it to be attached to the ends. Look closely and you can see this captured as per the prototype. Car was finished with Vallejo Acrylic Paint and given a coat of Pledge/Future Floor Care before the decals were applied and then a final coat of Model Masters Flat was applied.
A fun project using old and new materials and methods to construct
George Toman


Re: GM&O 35200 Series Automobile Car

Nelson Moyer
 

George, there’s no question about you setting the bar for craftsmanship. You’ve produced another outstanding model that would be completely at home is a museum. Your work is a benchmark for all of us.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gtws00 via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2021 9:59 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] GM&O 35200 Series Automobile Car

 

I finally got around to completing the build of a GM&O 35200 series Auto Car. The starting point was a HO Scale Speedwitch Kit that included a Branchline Body and resin ends, doors, parts and decals.
I was fortunate to have picked this kit up from Ed Hawkins who also help me obtain General Arrangement and Brake Arrangement Drawings from the National Museum of Transportation in St Louis. After looking the drawings over 
I decided to scratchbuild a new accurate underframe. Along the way many items were scratched or modified for this car to better match the general arrangement drawings. An item that stalled my build were the somewhat unique10 rung ladders. Friend Jim King of Smoky Mountain Model Works came to the rescue and designed and printed ladders from the General Arrangement Drawings using an SLA 3D printer. The Side and end grabs and Equipco Brake Housing is also 3d printed by Jim. Attached are a couple of photos of the build showing the underframe, sides, ends and a couple of the finished car still to be weathered. Note that the underframe side sill is built up of two C Channels as per the drawings and the crossties nest in the c-channel.  A note on the end ladders is that the right-hand stile is a flat piece of steel and not L-shaped as the other side. The flat piece has bends in it that allow for it to be attached to the ends. Look closely and you can see this captured as per the prototype. Car was finished with Vallejo Acrylic Paint and given a coat of Pledge/Future Floor Care before the decals were applied and then a final coat of Model Masters Flat was applied.
A fun project using old and new materials and methods to construct
George Toman


GM&O 35200 Series Automobile Car

gtws00
 

I finally got around to completing the build of a GM&O 35200 series Auto Car. The starting point was a HO Scale Speedwitch Kit that included a Branchline Body and resin ends, doors, parts and decals.
I was fortunate to have picked this kit up from Ed Hawkins who also help me obtain General Arrangement and Brake Arrangement Drawings from the National Museum of Transportation in St Louis. After looking the drawings over 
I decided to scratchbuild a new accurate underframe. Along the way many items were scratched or modified for this car to better match the general arrangement drawings. An item that stalled my build were the somewhat unique10 rung ladders. Friend Jim King of Smoky Mountain Model Works came to the rescue and designed and printed ladders from the General Arrangement Drawings using an SLA 3D printer. The Side and end grabs and Equipco Brake Housing is also 3d printed by Jim. Attached are a couple of photos of the build showing the underframe, sides, ends and a couple of the finished car still to be weathered. Note that the underframe side sill is built up of two C Channels as per the drawings and the crossties nest in the c-channel.  A note on the end ladders is that the right-hand stile is a flat piece of steel and not L-shaped as the other side. The flat piece has bends in it that allow for it to be attached to the ends. Look closely and you can see this captured as per the prototype. Car was finished with Vallejo Acrylic Paint and given a coat of Pledge/Future Floor Care before the decals were applied and then a final coat of Model Masters Flat was applied.
A fun project using old and new materials and methods to construct
George Toman


Re: Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads

Andy Laurent
 

Thank you for digging up those images, Dennis.  I will assume they were banded into bundles and placed U-down, loosely in the car...unless I see differently.

Andy L.
Madison WI


Re: MILW Gondola Painting

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks, Brian. That was my original intention, but I got ahead of myself and painted the whole car MILW freight car red. That makes masking to do the wood more difficult, as the drop doors are steel and presumably painted with some paint residual evident in service. It looks like I’ll have to mask and make the best of it. It would have been much easier to do the wood first, then mask and do the steel.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Shumaker
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2021 4:35 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] MILW Gondola Painting

 

Nelson,
I would certainly assume they were painted initially, repaints probably not. The Milw gons were used primarily for hauling coal and cinders and the abrasive and caustic nature of those materials would scrub the paint off in short order, so unless you’re modeling a newish car, I’d stick with well weathered wood.
Brian


Eleven Built RTR Resin freight car kits for sale

Chuck Cover
 

I have eleven built RTR resin Freight car kits for sale.  7 Sunshine Models, 3 Westerfield, 1 F&C.  I have been building during CoVid and now have too many on the layout.  I am happy to keep them around to change out the fleet, however, if you have an interest in any of them, please contact me OFF LIST. 

chuck dot cover at gmail dot com

Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM


Re: MILW Gondola Painting

Brian Shumaker
 

Nelson,
I would certainly assume they were painted initially, repaints probably not. The Milw gons were used primarily for hauling coal and cinders and the abrasive and caustic nature of those materials would scrub the paint off in short order, so unless you’re modeling a newish car, I’d stick with well weathered wood.
Brian


Re: Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads

Brian Carlson
 

Probably more history than you want.  

On Nov 22, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Dennis Storzek <dennis@...> wrote:

On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 12:31 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Do you and anyone else know when sheet pile was developed and came into common usage?
This website says it was developed in 1906: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larssen_sheet_piling

Common usage was likely after WWII , when the cost of labor made wood cribbed retaining walls more expensive that the cost of steel.

Dennis Storzek

--
Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads

Ralph W. Brown
 

Thanks, Dennis.
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Dennis Storzek
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2021 4:37 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads
 
On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 12:31 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Do you and anyone else know when sheet pile was developed and came into common usage?
This website says it was developed in 1906: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larssen_sheet_piling

Common usage was likely after WWII , when the cost of labor made wood cribbed retaining walls more expensive that the cost of steel.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 11:43 AM, Andy Laurent wrote:
Does anyone have images of sheet piling loads in gondolas?
Since the vast majority of intenet images are modern era, and most sheet piling comes from China and India these days, the only images I'm finding are in ISO containers:



I'm sure loading in a gon was similar. Note the open face can be either up or down, but I suspect down was more common before the days of giant fork lifts. The traditional method of handling with a crane used a hook on each end connected to a ring on the crane hook. and open side down means the hook can be placed on ALL the lengths, including the bottom most, and more importantly, the center of gravity will be below the hook.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 12:31 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Do you and anyone else know when sheet pile was developed and came into common usage?
This website says it was developed in 1906: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larssen_sheet_piling

Common usage was likely after WWII , when the cost of labor made wood cribbed retaining walls more expensive that the cost of steel.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Andy,
 
Do you and anyone else know when sheet pile was developed and came into common usage?
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Andy Laurent via groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads
 
STMFC-ers,

I have been searching for a source of HO scale sheet piling pieces, and having found one in Germany that produces a fantastic product, I am ready to create some mill gon loads for my 1952-era layout.  One question: How was sheet piling loaded in the transition era?  I am planning on 50' lengths of piling in 53' mill gons, and the width of my material allows for two rows/piles/bundles in the car.  Having looked at the AAR Open Top Loading Rules book from 1949, I see a few entries for structural steel shapes in gondolas (including Items 53 and 56-a). But having seen many steel shapes loaded loose in gons, I'm wondering what such loads really looked like in practice.

Does anyone have images of sheet piling loads in gondolas?

Thank you,
Andy L.
Madison, WI


MILW Gondola Painting

Nelson Moyer
 

I’m painting the RCW MILW composite gondola, and I’d like to know if the wood parts (sides and floor) were painted on the inside of the car body. I’m guessing it was, but the paint didn’t last very long, so in service appearance would be weathered wood with little paint.

 

Same question for the RCW NYC steel gondola with wood floor. Was the wood floor painted?

 

Nelson Moyer


Sheet Piling - Gondola Loads

Andy Laurent
 

STMFC-ers,

I have been searching for a source of HO scale sheet piling pieces, and having found one in Germany that produces a fantastic product, I am ready to create some mill gon loads for my 1952-era layout.  One question: How was sheet piling loaded in the transition era?  I am planning on 50' lengths of piling in 53' mill gons, and the width of my material allows for two rows/piles/bundles in the car.  Having looked at the AAR Open Top Loading Rules book from 1949, I see a few entries for structural steel shapes in gondolas (including Items 53 and 56-a). But having seen many steel shapes loaded loose in gons, I'm wondering what such loads really looked like in practice.

Does anyone have images of sheet piling loads in gondolas?

Thank you,
Andy L.
Madison, WI


Re: Question: When Did Scrap Metal Bailers Come Into General Use?

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Nov 22, 2021 at 10:50 AM, Ray Hutchison wrote:
(I think the scrap metal  shredders fed into the scrap metal bailers...)
This site: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_crusher says the first car crusher ('pancake machine') was developed in 1965. It goes on to say further development led to machines that could fold an entire car into a cube, but doesn't give a date, though obviously it post dated the development of the simple 'pancake' presses.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Question: When Did Scrap Metal Bailers Come Into General Use?

Philip Dove
 

The scrap bales at Ticks in the 1940s look smaller then more modern bales and not as compressed. The scrap bales l have seen going through Sarnia in southern Ontario carry shiny (steel?.) which l presume is scrap from a manufacturing process. 


On Mon, 22 Nov 2021, 18:50 Ray Hutchison, <rayhutchison2@...> wrote:
(I think the scrap metal  shredders fed into the scrap metal bailers...)


Re: Question: When Did Scrap Metal Bailers Come Into General Use?

Ray Hutchison
 

(I think the scrap metal  shredders fed into the scrap metal bailers...)


Re: Cranberry Boxcar

Benjamin Hom
 

Mike Clements wrote:
"I believe that is an ex-Sandy River & Rangely Lakes 2' gauge boxcar that was at Edaville in Carver, MA which was built around Ellis D Atwood's cranberry bog which was a member of the Ocean Spray co-op."

According to Michael Tylick's On30 scratchbuilding article in the April 2017 issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist, the cars are ex-Bridgeton & Saco River that did end up on the Edaville.  MRH back issues can be downloaded at
https://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/    

 
Ben Hom


Re: Question: When Did Scrap Metal Bailers Come Into General Use?

Matt Smith
 

Scrap bailers were around for the war effort. Morris Tick Scrap 1942, served by the IT and later Peoria & Eastern.

http://idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll62/id/30668/rec/30

http://idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll62/id/26737/rec/190

http://idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll62/id/30412/rec/180


--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] F&C Lehigh Valley ‘wrong way’ boxcar question

passcars
 

Centerline of body bolsters are probably 5'-0" from end sill instead of the more common 5'-6".

Steve Peery

5161 - 5180 of 193619