Date   

Model project shares

Eric Hansmann
 

Members of an email discussion group recently shared many resin freight car projects. The photos and notes have been assembled into the latest Resin Car Works blog post.

Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

steve_wintner
 

Bill, i have 2 compressors, a Mr Hobby L7 and a Paasche DC600R. 

The L7 maxes out around 25 psi, but is very quiet. The Paasche is capable of higher pressures but is noisier - but quieter than some, especially the home Depot type noisemakers. I'd recommend it but don't know if it's "silent". 

I think a gas tank may be your best bet. 

Steve


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

Douglas Harding
 

Bill I use a Iwata Hammerhead Shark https://www.madisonartshop.com/haheshaico.html   Extremely quiet, same as a refrigerator. It has a ½ gallon air tank and puts out a max of 118lbs and 2.15 cfm. I recently used it to power an 18g brad nailer, with no problems or lack of air doing a home renovation project. I doubt it would handle a larger nail gun in continuous use.

I also have a Badger 260 grit blaster http://www.badgerairbrush.com/Badger_260.asp Badger recommends 30psi, but max of 80psi. I have had no problems blasting baking soda. I have not used alum oxide, but don’t think there will be any problem.

 

While the Hammerhead Shark is the top of the line, Iwata has a line of “Silent” compressors. Sil-air is another brand http://www.silentaire.com/silentaire/sil_air.asp . And of course Badger also sells one http://www.badgerairbrush.com/Compressors.asp

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of WILLIAM PARDIE
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2021 8:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

 

Can anyone recommend a "Silent" compressor that has a high output.  I live in a condominium and if I use a standard compressor my neighbors are at my door with torches and pitchforks.

 

Bill Pardie

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>

Date: 11/30/21 3:30 PM (GMT-10:00)

Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

 

I definitely had to upgrade my compressor when I bought a North Coast Engineering grit blaster. Both capacity and flow are important variables. 

 

I too typically grit blast at around 60 PSI, both with baking soda (currently) and AlO2, whether plastic, resin, or brass.

 

Note that grit can also lose it's ability to "cut" with age so it does need to be replaced occasionally. I just had to do that with my baking soda a couple of months ago.

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of steve_wintner via groups.io <steve_wintner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2021 7:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

 

CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

I've found I needed 60+ psi and alu oxide grit to get good results on brass, using a Paasche Air Eraser. Soda or lower pressure didn't have enough oomph. 

Paul, which blaster are you using, and which grit ? 

Steve


Re: "Blaster"

Clark Propst
 

Forgot to mention I used baking soda. The 'blaster' recommendation on the box is 90 psi. Seemed to work best at that, novice speaking of course.
Clark


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

Mansell Peter Hambly
 

I use diving air. It is dry and filtered. Cheap to refill but costly to start up.

 

Mansell Peter Hambly

COQUITLAM, B.C. CANADA

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: WILLIAM PARDIE
Sent: November 30, 2021 6:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

 

Can anyone recommend a "Silent" compressor that has a high output.  I live in a condominium and if I use a standard compressor my neighbors are at my door with torches and pitchforks.

 

Bill Pardie

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>

Date: 11/30/21 3:30 PM (GMT-10:00)

To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io

Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

 

I definitely had to upgrade my compressor when I bought a North Coast Engineering grit blaster. Both capacity and flow are important variables. 

 

I too typically grit blast at around 60 PSI, both with baking soda (currently) and AlO2, whether plastic, resin, or brass.

 

Note that grit can also lose it's ability to "cut" with age so it does need to be replaced occasionally. I just had to do that with my baking soda a couple of months ago.

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of steve_wintner via groups.io <steve_wintner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2021 7:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

 

CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

I've found I needed 60+ psi and alu oxide grit to get good results on brass, using a Paasche Air Eraser. Soda or lower pressure didn't have enough oomph. 

Paul, which blaster are you using, and which grit ? 

Steve

 


Re: "Blaster"

Tim O'Connor
 

I've never used my blaster to remove a paint job - I use it to clean up the model after
chemical stripping, or to prepare an unpainted model or parts for painting.

Tim O'Connor

On 11/30/2021 6:50 PM, prr282 via groups.io wrote:
You shouldn't have to wait for your compressor to catch up.  Even the 60 psi is way too much to use on plastic or brass.  Hopefully you're using a pressure regulator with a moisture trap.  I' suggest starting with 30 psi.  Experiment with a scrap body to see what pressure removes the paint in a reasonable time without damaging the surface.

Paul B.
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Can anyone recommend a "Silent" compressor that has a high output.  I live in a condominium and if I use a standard compressor my neighbors are at my door with torches and pitchforks.

Bill Pardie


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
Date: 11/30/21 3:30 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

I definitely had to upgrade my compressor when I bought a North Coast Engineering grit blaster. Both capacity and flow are important variables. 

I too typically grit blast at around 60 PSI, both with baking soda (currently) and AlO2, whether plastic, resin, or brass.

Note that grit can also lose it's ability to "cut" with age so it does need to be replaced occasionally. I just had to do that with my baking soda a couple of months ago.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of steve_wintner via groups.io <steve_wintner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2021 7:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
I've found I needed 60+ psi and alu oxide grit to get good results on brass, using a Paasche Air Eraser. Soda or lower pressure didn't have enough oomph. 

Paul, which blaster are you using, and which grit ? 

Steve


Re: MILW Woodchip Gon was Re: MILW Gondola Painting

Tim O'Connor
 

All I know now is what was included in the file name - David Newcomb was the modeler
and it was at the "Pacific Northwest" RPM meet in 2008.

On 11/30/2021 10:49 AM, Jeff Helm wrote:
Tim

Thanks for posting those woodchip Gon photos.  I’m very curious about the MILW model as I have been trying to find both prototype info and a good model to start with.  Would you have any more information on that car?

I have found one photo showing a MILW wc gon being loaded at a mill in the Grays Harbor, Washington area in the late ‘50s, but it’s an oblique shot from a high angle and doesn’t show much of the Gon detail.
--
Cheers

Jeff Helm
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"

Bruce Smith
 

I definitely had to upgrade my compressor when I bought a North Coast Engineering grit blaster. Both capacity and flow are important variables. 

I too typically grit blast at around 60 PSI, both with baking soda (currently) and AlO2, whether plastic, resin, or brass.

Note that grit can also lose it's ability to "cut" with age so it does need to be replaced occasionally. I just had to do that with my baking soda a couple of months ago.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of steve_wintner via groups.io <steve_wintner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2021 7:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] "Blaster"
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
I've found I needed 60+ psi and alu oxide grit to get good results on brass, using a Paasche Air Eraser. Soda or lower pressure didn't have enough oomph. 

Paul, which blaster are you using, and which grit ? 

Steve


Re: "Blaster"

steve_wintner
 

I've found I needed 60+ psi and alu oxide grit to get good results on brass, using a Paasche Air Eraser. Soda or lower pressure didn't have enough oomph. 

Paul, which blaster are you using, and which grit ? 

Steve


Re: Single-sheathed box cars

Schleigh Mike
 

While the subject of this thread has been “Single-Sheathed Boxcars" it has certainly turned into a ‘hide car’ discussion.  Perhaps some of the group attended an RPM where my talk on this subject was given some years ago.  It was based on records (ORERs, yard reports, way bills, photos, etc.) of several hundred cars used for hide service during the period roughly 1950 into the early 1970s.  Findings reported were generally as follows——

        ORER-rostered groups of cars in this service was rare before 1960.  ATSF (40180-40244 & 40450-40474), CGW (4800-4989), and UP (340000-340886) were the only examples found.  RI began doing this about 1960 (40XXX series) and IC perhaps a bit earlier (34XXX(?) series) but I could not pin down the date of their first assignments.  Later in the 1960s & 70s this became more common but not consistent among RRs.

        Instead, railroads simply pulled needed cars from their XM (and other) rosters and used them for hide service.  Probably most received stenciling pertaining to “HIDE LOADING ONLY” but this was not apparently mandatory.  Sometimes this labelling would contain ‘return when empty’ messages but certainly not consistently.

        Cars assigned to this service were by any AAR designation essentially XM ‘roamers’ but you might ask, “How did that work for a smelly hide car?”  Car inspectors and clerks never doubted when they were standing near a hide car.  Thus they would never assign one to go anywhere but back home.

        While many hide cars were SS, this was nowhere the practiced rule.  Steel and wood sheathed cars were found in the survey, both 40 & 50 feet.  And cars were not necessarily old.  One example found was a B&O M-61 loaded at Denver in 1956.  This 50’ car was less than five years old.  PRR X29s were found loaded in California; Rutland DS car 8145 was loaded in Denver in 1951.  There were reasons non-hide cars would be pressed into this ignominious use but that is another discussion.  Two Swift reefers were loaded at Denver in 1951.  No icing was required via way bill.

         While hide loads were not glamorous needing much protection en-route, they were considered valuable and timely arrival at the tanning destination was expected by shippers and receivers.  Hide quality would diminish if not gotten soon to the tannery.  Complaints would be in order.  Single sheathed cars needed not to be in great condition but their conveyance was expected with minimal delay.

        To the point of lesser protection, Mark Langraf said, "I can attest that green hides showed up in Gowanda NY for many years in open top gondolas……”  Given his description of these loads being “soup” suggests these were carloads of fleshings (aka—skivings or offal) which was feedstock for the rendering (glue) plant there in that ERIE town.  Spoiled or waste hides might have been within the load as well as the offal accounting for the soup.  See a recent post (which I cannot find) by Elden Gatwood illustrating a delightfully done model.

        Doug Harding posted some nice hide car example photos and his copy of WAG 5009, in June 1960, is an invitation to mention the 500+ B&M XM-1 cars the WAG employed from 1958 to mid-1975.  WAG 5009 shows up three years later, in a John LaRue photo, stenciled for hide service working out of Coudersport, Penna. on the C&PA (outside connections via the WAG).  This 1963 photo is the only evidence I have found that any of these former B&M cars were employed by the WAG in this service.  This fleet was formed to bring per-diem to the Company.  On-line they were loaded with finished leather, wood products, merchandise, etc. and travelled all over the country.  They were, as we say, 'XM roamers' and could be loaded anywhere and used in the most high-level service.

Please forgive this long set of comments but I do hope it provides some further insight into the interesting world of hide cars.

Regards from Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.



On Tuesday, November 30, 2021, 09:18:56 AM EST, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


There were tanneries in several eastern locations.

The Western Maryland Railway served tanneries in Parsons and Elkins. The C&O served a tannery in Frank, WV, at the very end of the Greenbrier branch, just east of Durbin. All three operations were active into the 1970s.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 11/29/2021 3:42 PM Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:


Hide processors were also in New York, specifically, the Endicott Johnson Shoe Company that stretched along the ERIE and DL&W tracks from Binghamton through Johnson City and Endicott (about 6 miles).  The WAG also served large tanneries in Elkland  and Westfield, PA just south of the NY-PA border.

Todd Sullivan



Re: "Blaster"

prr282
 

You shouldn't have to wait for your compressor to catch up.  Even the 60 psi is way too much to use on plastic or brass.  Hopefully you're using a pressure regulator with a moisture trap.  I' suggest starting with 30 psi.  Experiment with a scrap body to see what pressure removes the paint in a reasonable time without damaging the surface.

Paul B.


"Blaster"

Clark Propst
 

There’s been discussions about grit blasting on the groups I frequent. Last spring/summer I bought a Central Pneumatic abrasive blaster gun as recommended on sale at some store. We were out of town and spotted that store, went in and bought one. Tried it out today. Nice day about 50, sun, little wind. I keep my old compressor in the garage. Can’t recall the specs and didn’t look while using the blaster. (calling it a ‘blaster’ is more Star Trekish ; ) Anyway the thing sucked air volume at a surprising rate. Would drop from 100 psi to 60 in 5 seconds. Then I’d have to wait for it to build up again. I was able to remove much of the paint off a plastic caboose Scalecoat stripper wouldn’t touch. Also did a adequate job of cleaning tarnished brass and roughing up a new piece. Time to prime the brass. I have some silver Scalecoat 1 I plan to use as a primer. One model will be basically orange and the other red. I do have Scalecoat 1 red, but think silver underneath might make the red pop a bit more? 
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


SPOOF

Dave Boss
 

Hi folks
              There is a site on face book toygiftoutlet.online that is selling Broadway limited engines for a ridiculously low price. It is a SPOOF from the Chinese. They are using the M. B. Klein's Model train stuff emblem as well. I called M. B. Klein's, and they tell me this is the third time they pulled this. If you have ordered get on the phone to your credit card company to stop payment.

Dave 


MILW Woodchip Gon was Re: MILW Gondola Painting

Jeff Helm
 

Tim

Thanks for posting those woodchip Gon photos.  I’m very curious about the MILW model as I have been trying to find both prototype info and a good model to start with.  Would you have any more information on that car?

I have found one photo showing a MILW wc gon being loaded at a mill in the Grays Harbor, Washington area in the late ‘50s, but it’s an oblique shot from a high angle and doesn’t show much of the Gon detail.
--
Cheers

Jeff Helm
The Olympic Peninsula Branch
https://olympicpeninsulabranch.blogspot.com/


Re: Mather Meat Reefer Assistance

Mike Clements
 

John, I have one of these in kit form still. I think this is the part. It looks like one of the drains, since they give you 6 of those you might be able to just substitute one. 


On Tue, Nov 30, 2021 at 06:25 AM, golden1014 wrote:
bell crank, or whatever sort of device was used at the bottom of the brake staff (next to the coupler).  

 
--
Mike Clements
Wakefield, MA
nyc65.wordpress.com


Re: Single-sheathed box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

There were tanneries in several eastern locations.

The Western Maryland Railway served tanneries in Parsons and Elkins. The C&O served a tannery in Frank, WV, at the very end of the Greenbrier branch, just east of Durbin. All three operations were active into the 1970s.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 11/29/2021 3:42 PM Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:


Hide processors were also in New York, specifically, the Endicott Johnson Shoe Company that stretched along the ERIE and DL&W tracks from Binghamton through Johnson City and Endicott (about 6 miles).  The WAG also served large tanneries in Elkland  and Westfield, PA just south of the NY-PA border.

Todd Sullivan



Mather Meat Reefer Assistance

golden1014
 

Gentlemen,

I'm building the HO scale Red Caboose model of a Mather meat refrigerator car.  I seem to have lost a part and need to fashion a new one.  Does anyone have a photo of a Mather meat reefer, B end?  Specifically I'm in need of a view of the bell crank, or whatever sort of device was used at the bottom of the brake staff (next to the coupler).  

Thanks for your help!

John Golden
Ramstein-Miesenbach, Germany

RPM Blog: https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Re: Photos of NC&StL 70100-70199 and SP&S 32005-32054 41' Flatcar Ends

Paul Doggett
 

Ken 

Its a good looking build.

Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 29 Nov 2021, at 22:15, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

After a lot of frustration with the decal situation for this car, I finally broke down and ordered the Champ set through eBay if only because it has most of the dimensional lettering I really need.  Apparently there was no SP&S reporting marks and number set on the decal.  Also it I understand the Champ set lacks reweigh dates. I have used a K4 SP&S boxcar set for now but this results in an oversize "SP&S". The car number was however the correct size.  The boxcar set lacks number to make up accurate Load Limit and Light Weight numbers and reweigh/repack dates and locations. I tried using lettering pieced together from my fairly extensive SP collection that includes T&NO and a few other older lines with an ampersand in the RR abbreviation but nothing matched the size needed for the flat car sill.  I would love a recommendation for a smaller SP&S RR reporting abbreviation.
<SPS 32018 Decal Problems.jpg>

Note I have modified the car for an AB airbrake upgrade to fit my modeling period.  I am only a semi-prototype modeler as I do not try to replicate all of the piping. I have a narrow Owl Mountain lumber load on hand to add some additional weight to the car. 
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Single-sheathed box cars

Kenneth Montero
 

Please note that the WAG boxcar still retained, in the upper right corner, the logo of its former owner, the Boston & Maine Railroad.

Ken Montero

On 11/29/2021 5:58 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:


Nelson yes SS cars were used for hide service. Here are a few photos.


Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Monday, November 29, 2021 4:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Single-sheathed box cars


Most of the hide cars I’ve seen modeled were 40 ft. steel boxcars. Was that pretty standard, or were SS boxcars also used?


Nelson Moyer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Monday, November 29, 2021 4:24 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Single-sheathed box cars


Owen, hides can indeed be heavy. Sometime in the 50s packing plants switched from salting dry hides to soaking hides in a brine solution and shipping them wet. Wet hides are indeed much heavier than dry hides.


As to interchange. Hides came from slaughter houses, ie packing plants. Most of which were located in the Mid-West, ie Chicago, Omaha, Kansas City, St Paul, Sioux City, etc. And you will find that many tanneries were located out east, New England, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Tennessee, etc. A IC hide car would most likely be in captive service. It could be loaded with hides online in Chicago, Dubuque, Waterloo, Fort Dodge, Omaha, Sioux City and other locations. But the raw hides would be headed east, interchanged most likely at Chicago to any of many eastern roads.


Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


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