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Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Philip Dove
 

I would be surprised to think a 1953 model truck would not be seen two years later. 
I drive a 9 year old car. Modelling the year 1955 won't feature only 1955 made items. 


Steel Fabrication in the Twenties

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

A while ago we had some discussion as to how the bolt holes for the deck on a cast steel flatcar were drilled. While looking for something else, I ran into a neat youtube video of the construction of the Empire State building, that has about five minutes of fab shop practice. Starting at 2:27 is a view of a gang drill setup that was likekly similar to what General Steel Castings used. Enjoy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EdDECW5FLAM

Dennis Storzek


Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

Some thoughts about heavy trucks... In the forties and fifties there were still more regional builders than nation wide brands. By that time International Harvester, Mack, and maybe White were nation wide, but as a kid growing up in Chicago, I never saw Kenworth, Peterbilt, or Brockway or Marmon tractors, and likely nobody outside of 250 miles from Chicago ever saw Hendricksen or Diamond T. So pay attention to what brands were popular in your modeling area.

For a real oddball transit mixer, when I was in high school during the sixties, Material Service Corp., a big Chicago area concrete supplier, had made a deal with Carrier Crane Corp. to supply chassis for their mixers. These had the standard single person cab and low engine bonnet used to clear the boom on a mobile crane, not needed in the mixer application but there just the same.

I googled "Carrier Crane transit mixer" and come to find these must have been more common than I thought. The links to youtube videos have some good detail shots of a mid-sixties mechanically driven mixer drum.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEVNnyqU-Bg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bX2WmyQG1ZQ

Dennis Storzek


Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Guy Wilber
 


Andy wrote:

“The Lindberg art seems to be of a pre-war to early 50's White. If the art is close to the actual model. the fenders look to be stylized to a bit of inaccuracy. Also, super singles, the large tires which are super common on today's transit mixers, are much more recent so are not suitable for the 50's.”  

All the Mini Lindy offerings used the same wheels and tires.  Most were crude, and the Mixer was no exception.  The drum was about the only thing of use, the cab had no details as within the art work and the appliances including the water tank, extra chutes, etc., were horrible.  

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

A_._,_._,_

All


Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Fri, Dec 17, 2021 at 12:30 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Note the box art does not show the water tank on top of the mixing drum.

Sure it does... it's just tucked in behind the cab, mounted lower than some. I seem to recall this was an air pressurized water system, so should still work. I also think that is a late forties, early fifties truck cab, likely a mix of elements to specifically avoid looking exactly like any one brand.

Dennis Storzek


Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Andy Carlson
 

The Lindberg art seems to be of a pre-war to early 50's White. If the art is close to the actual model. the fenders look to be stylized to a bit of inaccuracy. Also, super singles, the large tires which are super common on today's transit mixers, are much more recent so are not suitable for the 50's. The barrel drum on the Walthers German mixer looks small enough for many of our years of interest; the truck, not so much.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Friday, December 17, 2021, 12:30:59 PM PST, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:


Looking at other Mini-Lindy kits, the instructions are copyrighted 1968. So I suspect that is the date the kit was released. The prototype is probably early to  mid 60s. Note the box art does not show the water tank on top of the mixing drum.

Doug Harding

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek

Lindberg made an approximately HO cement mixer:

Lindberg 14 HO Mini-Lindy 1968 Cement Mixer Kit | eBay

 

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Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Douglas Harding
 

Looking at other Mini-Lindy kits, the instructions are copyrighted 1968. So I suspect that is the date the kit was released. The prototype is probably early to  mid 60s. Note the box art does not show the water tank on top of the mixing drum.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek
Sent: Friday, December 17, 2021 2:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

 

Lindberg made an approximately HO cement mixer:

 

Lindberg 14 HO Mini-Lindy 1968 Cement Mixer Kit | eBay

 

I’m not sure if 1968 is when the kit came out, or the date of the prototype.  It looks like it could be backdated.

 

If I remember correctly, Model Railroader did a series of articles on an extension to their Beer Line project railroad that included a ready-mix plant.  (Or, maybe my memory is playing games with me.)

 

Jim van Gaasbeek

Irvine, CA


Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek
 

Lindberg made an approximately HO cement mixer:

 

Lindberg 14 HO Mini-Lindy 1968 Cement Mixer Kit | eBay

 

I’m not sure if 1968 is when the kit came out, or the date of the prototype.  It looks like it could be backdated.

 

If I remember correctly, Model Railroader did a series of articles on an extension to their Beer Line project railroad that included a ready-mix plant.  (Or, maybe my memory is playing games with me.)

 

Jim van Gaasbeek

Irvine, CA


NP Boxcars At Grain Elevator

Bob Chaparro
 

NP Boxcars At Grain Elevator

A Russell Lee photo from the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017790201/

Taken July 1941.

Title:

Elevator and railroad cars. Eureka, Walla Walla County, Washington

Click on the TIFF version to enlarge and see the details.

Possibly grain doors appear at the base of the grain elevator.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: PFE Reefers

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PFE Reefers

A Russell Lee photo from the Library of Congress

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8b24459/

Click on the TIF version to enlarge and see the details.

Taken at Big Spring, Texas, in March 1940.

The second reefer from the left is a Western Pacific car, possibly PFE  50967.

Also visible to the left are quite a few tank cars, an ice house, icing platform and downdraft cooling tower.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Kenneth Montero
 

Allen,

I think your assumption about the Mack B is a safe one. Looking at ads from that era, the appearance of the Mack Model B did not change much (if at all) in the time period of your interest.

Ken Montero

On 12/17/2021 11:59 AM Allen Cain <allencaintn@...> wrote:


I am planning on using the Athearn Mack B cement mixer truck on my 1955 layout.  Now I am not a truck expert but Wikipedia says that these were first produced in 1953 so I am assuming that the body style did not change significantly into 1955.  As for the mixer body itself, close enough for me.

Thoughts?

Thanks for all of the input on the mixing plant suggestions.

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Allen Cain
 

I am planning on using the Athearn Mack B cement mixer truck on my 1955 layout.  Now I am not a truck expert but Wikipedia says that these were first produced in 1953 so I am assuming that the body style did not change significantly into 1955.  As for the mixer body itself, close enough for me.

Thoughts?

Thanks for all of the input on the mixing plant suggestions.

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO

--
Allen Cain
Modeling the Southern in 1955 in HO Scale


Modeling projects

Eric Hansmann
 

I've shared a progress review covering several HO scale freight car projects in my latest blog post. It's great to have a few models in the decal application stages.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


Re: Air hoses for freight cars

Tim O'Connor
 

The least breakable ones (silicone) are the ones I get now. From Hi-Tech, Tangent, and Moloco.

The others are pretty, but they are also extremely fragile.

On 12/16/2021 5:15 PM, Gene Semon via groups.io wrote:
What recommendations do you have for air hoses for freight cars in the 50s?  I see they are available from Cal-Scale, DA, Hi-tech, Tangent, Kadee and maybe more.

Thanks,

Gene Semon
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Kenneth Montero
 

Dennis,

Thank you for those observations. Glad to learn more about changes over time.

Ken Montero

On 12/16/2021 6:25 PM Dennis Storzek <dennis@...> wrote:


On Wed, Dec 15, 2021 at 07:24 PM, Kenneth Montero wrote:
Walthers has one in stock (https://www.walthers.com/international-r-7600-3-axle-cement-mixer-assembled-white) in their SceneMaster line - too new for your time period, but you may be able to take the mixer off the frame and mount it on a different truck frame.
Two comments, the hydraulically operated "training wheels" weight transfer device seems to have been developed in the late sixties, and since it adds to the total load the truck can carry, the mixing drum is likely too large for an older three axle truck... the drum looks too fat to my eye. This modern prototype is also lacking the characteristic crosswise water tank mounted high just behind the cab.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Air hoses for freight cars

Nelson Moyer
 

I used Kadee when I started building plastic freight cars, but they had a short lifespan due to their ridged nature and the small diameter at the bracket. When Hi Tech Details came out with the rubber air hoses, I made them my standard and never looked back. I’ve never had one brake off, and they’re on over 200 freight cars to date. I glue them to Precision Scale air hose brackets with canopy cement.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of lrkdbn via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2021 7:01 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Air hoses for freight cars

 

I use Kadee-I run the train air pipe out to just past the bracket at the end of the car, then cut the air hose casting at the back of the angle cock. Drill a .020 hole into the angle cock,, attach with rubberized ACC. I admit it can be knocked off, but is easy to replace.
Larry King


Re: Air hoses for freight cars

lrkdbn
 

I use Kadee-I run the train air pipe out to just past the bracket at the end of the car, then cut the air hose casting at the back of the angle cock. Drill a .020 hole into the angle cock,, attach with rubberized ACC. I admit it can be knocked off, but is easy to replace.
Larry King


Re: Concrete Wet Batch Plants in the 1950s

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Wed, Dec 15, 2021 at 07:24 PM, Kenneth Montero wrote:
Walthers has one in stock (https://www.walthers.com/international-r-7600-3-axle-cement-mixer-assembled-white) in their SceneMaster line - too new for your time period, but you may be able to take the mixer off the frame and mount it on a different truck frame.
Two comments, the hydraulically operated "training wheels" weight transfer device seems to have been developed in the late sixties, and since it adds to the total load the truck can carry, the mixing drum is likely too large for an older three axle truck... the drum looks too fat to my eye. This modern prototype is also lacking the characteristic crosswise water tank mounted high just behind the cab.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Air hoses for freight cars

Brian Carlson
 

I currently use Hi-tech rubber ones. But you have to get the older 22” version not the modern version. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Dec 16, 2021, at 5:15 PM, Gene Semon via groups.io <mopac1@...> wrote:

What recommendations do you have for air hoses for freight cars in the 50s?  I see they are available from Cal-Scale, DA, Hi-tech, Tangent, Kadee and maybe more.

Thanks,

Gene Semon

--
Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: RealSTMFC] Air hoses for freight cars

Bruce Smith
 

Gene,

HiTech, unequivocally, as they will not break or fall off.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Gene Semon via groups.io <mopac1@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2021 4:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Air hoses for freight cars
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
What recommendations do you have for air hoses for freight cars in the 50s?  I see they are available from Cal-Scale, DA, Hi-tech, Tangent, Kadee and maybe more.

Thanks,

Gene Semon

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