Date   

Re: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway boxcars

Bruce Smith
 

Ray,


Awesome! That’s the first photo of a TEM car in TEM paint that I think I have ever seen. There’s enough there to potentially do a credibly job patching together the lettering.

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Ray Breyer via groups.io" <rtbsvrr69@...>
Reply-To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, January 25, 2022 at 8:02 AM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>, "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway boxcars

 

CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

I only have two images of TEM/ON Fowlers in my collection, both lifted from eBay auctions. They're attached.

 

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

 

 

 

On Monday, January 24, 2022, 07:14:11 PM CST, John Riddell <riddellj@...> wrote:

 

 

Bruce,

The T&NO purchased two groups of 36' Fowler single-sheathed boxcars. 

Group 1 -- 100 cars in series 80200-80398 (even numbers)  formerly Can Govt Railways 81611-82610, built 1917 with 5' doors, and 4 post ends

Group 2 -- 50 cars in series 80400-80498 (even numbers)  formerly CN 427000-427999,  built 1923 with 6' doors.

Group 3 -- 100 cars series 80000-80198, (even numbers) 36', all wood body, 6 foot doors  

Group 4  -  50 cars series 60100-60198, (even numbers), 36', all wood body, 6'-5" doors. . 

In Dec 1953 the following numbers continued in revenue service

group 1 34
group 2, 20
group 3, 6
group 4, 0

The TEM changed name to Ontario Northland (ONT) in 1946.
It took some time to re-letter the boxcars with ONT reporting marks. 
Some of the Fowler box cars were re-lettered with ONT reporting marks. One was ONT 80276.

There are very few photos of these cars. 
There have been no lettering sets commercially available for the TEM or ONT cars.

Reasonable models can be built using the various HO kits available for Fowler boxcars. 

Hope this helps.
John Riddell 


Re: Finish issues

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Here is a question for those of you who use distilled water when applying decals.  I have spent a lifetime using water with a few drops of detergent when decaling.  If you use distilled water do you still add the detergent?

Thanks:


Bill Pardie

_._,_._,_


Re: Removing lettering from Branchline cars?

mopacfirst
 

I like the fiberglass brush idea.  I already use one of those for cleaning off the 'blackening' on weathered rail.  I'll try the paper towel with Solvaset trick also.

In most cases the renumbering is the same number of digits and identical lettering size as what's there now, so the new lettering and some light weathering makes the new decal numbering sort of disappear.  I've done some with scraping and sanding, and it's not too bad but not that great either.

All for building ten or more Branchline cars from a given series where four numbers were produced in the original run.  I should note that this occurs, for me, on Stewart three-bay offset-side hoppers also, but for the hoppers, since the cars are black, I have no trouble matching the paint with a little masking.

Ron Merrick


Red Faced RPM Valley Forge

Steve Salotti
 

To get maximum attention nothing beats a good big mistake, and I just made one.  A stray finger posted this message before I was finished. Now, back to the program.

As we draw toward the end of winter and hopefully the end of this Covid pandemic, it's time to make your plans to attend RPM Valley Forge in Malvern Pennsylvania on March 25h to the 27th.  The committee is working hard to create a program that includes;
        First class clinics
        Model display room
        Top notch vendors,
         and operating sessions on several local railroads.
The venue will be the same great hotel we have used in the past, The Desmond at Valley Forge.  For full information go to our web site at RPM Valley Forge.
Looking forward to seeing you all again!
The RPM Valley Forge Committee


On-Line Model Railroad Magazine Indexes

Bob Chaparro
 

On-Line Model Railroad Magazine Indexes

Information courtesy of Paul Wilfong through the San Diego Division/PSR/NMRA publication, The Mail Hook.

Paul writes:

“Model Railroader Magazine recently made a wholesale change in their website. As part of the change, their "all-time on-line archive" of the magazine was affected. They replaced it with one that has a search function that really does not work for my needs. This led to much gnashing of teeth on my part. I emailed them asking about it, and they said they are aware of the reduced functionality, which they are working on but sadly will take a long time.

But, they kindly supplied a link to another on-line magazine index. I've tried it out and it seems to be a very nice resource, so I thought I'd pass it along for others who may not be aware of it.

http://www.olimpia.com:8084/IntroPage.html

Though I will forever miss MR's original on-line access, I think this link will fill the bill for me until their new archive is updated.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Model Railroads of Southern California

https://groups.io/g/ModelRailroadsofSoCalif


Re: RPM Valley Forge

Eric Hansmann
 

Here’s the RPM Valley Forge website.

http://www.rpmvalleyforge.com/

 

Steve, can you encourage the committee to post the names of the presenters and their clinic topic on the website? Those are huge selling points for many people.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve Salotti
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2022 10:40 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] RPM Valley Forge

 

As we draw toward the end of winter and hopefully the end of this Covid pandemic, it's time to make your plans to attend RPM Valley Forge in Malvern Pennsylvania on March 25h to the 27th.  The committee is working hard to create a program that includes;
First class clinics
Model display room
Top notch vendors,
and operating sessions. 
The venue  


RPM Valley Forge

Steve Salotti
 

As we draw toward the end of winter and hopefully the end of this Covid pandemic, it's time to make your plans to attend RPM Valley Forge in Malvern Pennsylvania on March 25h to the 27th.  The committee is working hard to create a program that includes;
First class clinics
Model display room
Top notch vendors,
and operating sessions. 
The venue  


Re: Removing lettering from Branchline cars?

Tim O'Connor
 

Bernd

this (your method) is the best method to start with

removing lettering on old Front Range cars was the hardest I have found
It's ironic because the paint job would slough off with a wash of Accupaint
thinner - so you were left with an unpainted, lettered car :-)


On 1/25/2022 9:44 AM, Bernd Schroeder wrote:
Ron,

one method I have used with success on some models (but not Branchline so far) is as follows:

- cover only the lettering to be removed with a piece of paper towel
- soak the paper towel w decal setting solution
wait until it dries and resoak (I use Solvaset...)
- after 30 minutes remove the paper towel and try to remove the lettering by applying some tape to it
- if necessary, repeat the process
- do not use mechanical methods in the process unless you intend to do heavy weathering....

Bernd

Adelsdorf, Germany

--
Diese Nachricht wurde von meinem Android Mobiltelefon mit GMX Mail gesendet.
Am 25.01.22, 14:48 schrieb mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>:
There are a few posts in the archive with questions about the best methods to remove lettering from Branchline cars, but not a solid answer that I've been able to find.  My desire is to remove small areas of the lettering, such as the car number, without damaging the car's paint.  I experimented with a couple of common liquid hobby products a number of years ago and ended up removing the paint entirely.  Unfortunately I don't remember what I used.

I've done it crudely using light scraping and sanding, but that's often not pretty.

Ron Merrick

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Removing lettering from Branchline cars?

Craig Wilson
 

Here is a technique that I have used:  a hand cleaner that contains pumice (brand name "GoJo").  A small amount is applied using a cotton-tip swab - like a Q-tip although I avoid the ones with a flexible plastic "handle."  I have found swabs with wooden shafts in the paint section of a hardware store and they work much better.

Apply the GoJo and GENTLY scrub using the swab.  If the underlying paint starts to be removed it will show up on the cotton swab.  I keep a dish of distilled water handy to rinse off the cleaning solution.  Sometimes it takes repeated applications to remove the lettering satisfactorily.  In some cases I have used this technique first then applied a wash of Solvaset scrubbing it with a fresh swab and/or stiff paint brush.  If the lettering doesn't come off after a few minutes of GENTLE scrubbing, it is time to try something else.

Craig Wilson


Re: Removing lettering from Branchline cars?

Jay Styron
 

Ron,
A Micro Mark fiberglass brush sometimes works.
https://www.micromark.com/Mini-Brush-with-Fiberglass-Bristles
-Jay Styron


Re: Sp Box Car 83627

Jay Styron
 

Lester,
Don’t forget to route the car to Bakersfield when empty, as stenciled!
Nice job…
-Jay Styron
La Mesa Model Railroad Club


Re: Finish issues

John Sykes III
 

Caveat - Lacquers and water don't mix!!!

Anyone who works with furniture knows that blushing and water rings are two problems that come up with lacquer finishes.  Since Testor's Glosscoat and Dullcoat are both lacquers, they must be used in dry environments.  I also like it warm.  Mid-80's with <50% humidity is what I prefer when shooting lacquers (also goes for Scalecoat I, which is a lacquer).  Oven drying usually prevents the problem, but remember, styrene turns to goop at 212 decrees F!  I think this is true for most casting resins, too.  I usually only use the oven for brass or white metal models painted with Scalecoat I.  I set the oven for as low as it will go, then turn it off before putting the model in.  The resulting finish is hard, glossy and usually perfect for decaling.  Also, most decal films are lacquer-based or clear coated with a lacquer (I clear coat all my decals before using to prevent cracking).  White vinegar is used to treat water rings on furniture, because the acid softens the lacquer.  MicroSet is, essentially, white vinegar (but a little stronger).  MicroSol, with butyl cellosolve, is more aggressive, because the solvent in it also softens the underlying paint, fusing the decal and paint together (with a solvent based paint that is, this usually eliminates any edge problems).  Paint stores supplying professional cabinet & furniture makers carry butyl cellosolve, because it is used to slow drying times of lacquers, helping to get a high gloss finish on cabinets/furniture.


Re: Removing lettering from Branchline cars?

Bernd Schroeder
 

Ron,

one method I have used with success on some models (but not Branchline so far) is as follows:

- cover only the lettering to be removed with a piece of paper towel
- soak the paper towel w decal setting solution
wait until it dries and resoak (I use Solvaset...)
- after 30 minutes remove the paper towel and try to remove the lettering by applying some tape to it
- if necessary, repeat the process
- do not use mechanical methods in the process unless you intend to do heavy weathering....

Bernd

Adelsdorf, Germany

--
Diese Nachricht wurde von meinem Android Mobiltelefon mit GMX Mail gesendet.
Am 25.01.22, 14:48 schrieb mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...>:

There are a few posts in the archive with questions about the best methods to remove lettering from Branchline cars, but not a solid answer that I've been able to find.  My desire is to remove small areas of the lettering, such as the car number, without damaging the car's paint.  I experimented with a couple of common liquid hobby products a number of years ago and ended up removing the paint entirely.  Unfortunately I don't remember what I used.

I've done it crudely using light scraping and sanding, but that's often not pretty.

Ron Merrick


Re: Another Finish Repair Question

Eric Hansmann
 

There’s also Testor’s Easy Lift Off to apply sparingly with a cotton swab.

https://www.testors.com/product-catalog/testors-brands/model-master/primers-top-coats-thinners-cleaners/paint-and-decal-remover

 

It might be too aggressive but is another tool for the tool box.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2022 6:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Another Finish Repair Question

 

I would try sanding only the area covered by the decal film with 220 or 380 grit wet or dry paper (available at an auto parts store that sells auto painting supplies or a GOOD hardware store). My favorite tool for this is an old artist brush handle cut off at an angle, to make a  elliptical flat surface that the paper is glued to. The purpose for sanding is to remove the clear finish over as much of the decal film surface as possible... when the decal printing starts to go away you know you're there. Then, flood the decal with a strong decal setting solution, to soften the film, keeping it wet until the film can be scrubbed off with a stiff paintbrush. With patience it is doable, but not quickly.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway boxcars

Ray Breyer
 

I only have two images of TEM/ON Fowlers in my collection, both lifted from eBay auctions. They're attached.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



On Monday, January 24, 2022, 07:14:11 PM CST, John Riddell <riddellj@...> wrote:


Bruce,

The T&NO purchased two groups of 36' Fowler single-sheathed boxcars. 

Group 1 -- 100 cars in series 80200-80398 (even numbers)  formerly Can Govt Railways 81611-82610, built 1917 with 5' doors, and 4 post ends

Group 2 -- 50 cars in series 80400-80498 (even numbers)  formerly CN 427000-427999,  built 1923 with 6' doors.

Group 3 -- 100 cars series 80000-80198, (even numbers) 36', all wood body, 6 foot doors  

Group 4  -  50 cars series 60100-60198, (even numbers), 36', all wood body, 6'-5" doors. . 

In Dec 1953 the following numbers continued in revenue service

group 1 34
group 2, 20
group 3, 6
group 4, 0

The TEM changed name to Ontario Northland (ONT) in 1946.
It took some time to re-letter the boxcars with ONT reporting marks. 
Some of the Fowler box cars were re-lettered with ONT reporting marks. One was ONT 80276.

There are very few photos of these cars. 
There have been no lettering sets commercially available for the TEM or ONT cars.

Reasonable models can be built using the various HO kits available for Fowler boxcars. 

Hope this helps.
John Riddell 


Removing lettering from Branchline cars?

mopacfirst
 

There are a few posts in the archive with questions about the best methods to remove lettering from Branchline cars, but not a solid answer that I've been able to find.  My desire is to remove small areas of the lettering, such as the car number, without damaging the car's paint.  I experimented with a couple of common liquid hobby products a number of years ago and ended up removing the paint entirely.  Unfortunately I don't remember what I used.

I've done it crudely using light scraping and sanding, but that's often not pretty.

Ron Merrick


Re: Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway boxcars lettering

John Riddell
 

CDS Lettering set 404 is the classic arched lettering and is based on a 1910 Dominion Car & Foundry (Montreal) builders photo of TEM 80008, a double-sheathed 36' boxcar with a straight steel underframe, built in Dominion Car and Foundry Lot 21. An accurate model can be built using an Accurail 1700 series kit by modifying the kits fish belly underframe or replacing the kits fish belly underframe with Accurail part 131 36-foot straight underframe. TMR Distributing sells a selection of CDS lettering sets, possibly including set 404.

Unfortunately no lettering is available for the TEM 36' Fowler cars. 

John Riddell


Re: Help ID on SP DD 50' single sheathed boxcar

vapeurchapelon
 

Tim and other replyers,
 
lots of thanks! This of course helps a lot.
 
Tim O'Connor wrote:
That is if you're brave enough to replace
the end on a brass model with a plastic part.
 
If I would go that road I would make a CAD-File of the Walthers end and let it cast in brass. ;-)
 
Best Regards
 
Johannes
 
Gesendet: Montag, 24. Januar 2022 um 23:11 Uhr
Von: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] Help ID on SP DD 50' single sheathed boxcar

Another shot of the end. The Walthers 50 foot single sheathed box car kit came
with this 3-3-3 end - and it's a separate part! (That is if you're brave enough to replace
the end on a brass model with a plastic part.)

Tim O'Connor


On 1/24/2022 3:25 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Johannes wrote:
sad to read this. I, too have one of these since this is the only 50' "outside-braced" box car made in brass. I already did some upgrades and want to replace the end ladders as these are only poorly looking "ladder strips", but now I am very interested which of the car ends is wrong and to what degree. Tony, Tim - do you can help, please?
The B end is modeled as a corrugated end, should be Dreadnaught. I think maybe the builder was misled by the Cyc drawing, which just shows the end ribs in profile like corrugated ones. 
 
Below is a builder photo of a B end — actually an A-50-11 but differing only at the other end, the A end, where end doors were located (on -10) or not located (on -11).
 
Tony Thompson

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Another Finish Repair Question

Tim O'Connor
 

Dennis

I have found that the tiny acrylic sanding blocks - the size of a finger tip - are excellent
for precise sanding of small surface areas. I got a set from National Scale Car and I glued
a couple of different size grit papers to them.

On 1/24/2022 7:22 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
I would try sanding only the area covered by the decal film with 220 or 380 grit wet or dry paper (available at an auto parts store that sells auto painting supplies or a GOOD hardware store). My favorite tool for this is an old artist brush handle cut off at an angle, to make a  elliptical flat surface that the paper is glued to. The purpose for sanding is to remove the clear finish over as much of the decal film surface as possible... when the decal printing starts to go away you know you're there. Then, flood the decal with a strong decal setting solution, to soften the film, keeping it wet until the film can be scrubbed off with a stiff paintbrush. With patience it is doable, but not quickly.

Dennis Storzek
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Finish issues

Nelson Moyer
 

So why wouldn’t a clear flat finish do the same thing? If you use two clear coats, it seems to me that the edges would be twice as thick as if you use only one. I don’t see how the surface of the decal is ever the same as the car body surface, but the difference is insignificant unless you use really thick decals and probably not really significant with them either.

 

As for flat finish buildup, I’d worry more about buildup on grab irons, ladder rungs, Z-bars, placard boards etc. than decals. You may be overthinking this. Show me a photo of buildup on the edge of a decal.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Vinski
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2022 9:11 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Finish issues

 

Putting gloss coat over decals seals the edges of the decal and prevents the flat finish or weathering from building up around the edges. It also makes the surface of the decal the same as the rest of the model so the final finish will be uniform.
Mark Vinski

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