Date   

Re: Photo: SP&S Boxcar 10098

Eric Hansmann
 

Ken,

 

Attached is an image of an NP boxcar with what seems like a 1933 weigh stencil.

 

SP&S may have followed NP practices at some point, just not in the early 1930s.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Adams
Sent: Saturday, April 9, 2022 12:04 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: SP&S Boxcar 10098

 

Didn't SP&S largely follow NP practices...
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Photo: SP&S Boxcar 10098

Ken Adams
 

Didn't SP&S largely follow NP practices...
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Photo: SP&S Boxcar 10098

Eric Hansmann
 

I see a 1932 weigh date stencil at the far end of the car side. I wonder why the SP&S continued to use older lettering guidelines nearly a decade after they were updated. Here are the elements that are not current to 1932 practices.

 

  • The US Safety Appliances stencil requirement was discontinued in 1925
  • Cubic Capacity data was moved to the right end of the car with 1927 revisions
  • Load Limit became a preferred data line in 1925
  • Abbreviations for CAPY, LT WT, and LD LMT came into use in 1927
  • Dimensions presented on the right side were revised in 1925 with abbreviations preferred
  • The hardware inventory on the right side was removed from the recommendations in 1927

 

Here’s a PDF that illustrates the changes in lettering recommendations that came into use in 1927.
hansmanns.org/ARA_lettering_guidelines_1920_+_1927.pdf

 

Some railroads started applying these recommendations to new cars delivered in 1926, while others chose to use their own standards into the 1930s. Early 1930s photos of freight cars owned by the NP, NYC, and a few other lines will show the home road preferences.

 

Possibly that’s the path taken by the SP&S.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, April 9, 2022 11:34 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: SP&S Boxcar 10098

 

Photo: SP&S Boxcar 10098

Photo from the Oregon Historical Society:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/sp-s-freight-railcar

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

Individual vertical boards are very evident.

Car built in 1919. Has the stencil “United States Safety-Appliance Standard” from 1911 Railroad Safety Appliance Act amendment.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Portable Fan Precooling

Bob Chaparro
 

Portable Fan Precooling

The text and photo are from the USDA publication, Technical Bulletin No. 505, Refrigeration Of Oranges In Transit From California, dated

January 1936.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup

++++

By the portable fan method of precooling, the warm fruit is loaded into an iced car and 1 or 2 fans of propeller type are installed at the top opening of the bunker at each end of the car.

These fans are held in place by special fittings which direct the air coming from the ice bunkers entirely through the fans, and are operated by small electric motors, the wiring of which is carried out of the car at the top of the doorway and is attached to the power line of the packing house. The fans pull the car air into the ice bunkers through the bottom opening and force it out over

the top of the load, thus reversing the normal circulation of air in the car. Some shippers apply salt to the ice during precooling in order to speed up the rate of cooling. After precooling, the

bunkers are replenished by the shipper before the car is moved.

This system of fan precooling is an outgrowth of the original portable car precooler described by Galloway, where small motor-driven blowers were installed in the bunkers directly under the

hatch plugs, which pulled air up through the ice and discharged it into the body of the car through the top bunker opening.

 


Photo: GN Reefer 91300 (1910)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: GN Reefer 91300 (1910)

Photo from the Oregon Historical Society:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/great-northern-railroad-refrigerator-car

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

Notice the small door on the left side. Anyone know its purpose?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: SP&S Boxcar 10098

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: SP&S Boxcar 10098

Photo from the Oregon Historical Society:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/sp-s-freight-railcar

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

Individual vertical boards are very evident.

Car built in 1919. Has the stencil “United States Safety-Appliance Standard” from 1911 Railroad Safety Appliance Act amendment.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: SP&S Tank Car 38610 (1951)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: SP&S Tank Car 38610 (1951)

Photo from the Oregon Historical Society:

https://digitalcollections.ohs.org/sp-s-tank-car

Click on the photo twice for maximum enlargement.

The close-up shows detail of a cartridge bearing application.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


File /Mather Boxcar Instructions.pdf uploaded #file-notice

main@RealSTMFC.groups.io Notification <noreply@...>
 

The following files and folders have been uploaded to the Files area of the main@RealSTMFC.groups.io group.

By: lrkdbn <lrkdbn@...>

Description:
Instructions for Sunshine Models Mather box car kit


Re: NYC’s Westside High Line Advertisement

Charlie Vlk
 

All-
As has been pointed out, the Bloomingdale Line was an independent railroad east west orientated built at grade and later part of the Milwaukee Road.  By the time of track elevation the Goose Island area it terminated in had developed into a heavy industrial area but I don’t think itsl line side industries were very large in number.  
The High Line was a special case…it had operating solutions like cowboys and special dummy power designed not to frighten horses but able to handle heavy trains.  
The Bloomingdale Line was just a secondary main that got elevated. 
The city was not built up with vast outlying vacant properties at the time of track elevation.  While grade crossing accidents were a problem, the area was not congested like the High Line when it was built.
  The biggest connection is that the High Line inspired it to become an elevated linear park.
Charlie Vlk


On Apr 9, 2022, at 9:58 AM, Dennis Storzek <dennis@...> wrote:

On Sat, Apr 9, 2022 at 06:02 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
There is an abandoned high line in Chicago due west from the downtown area right?
That would be the Milwaukee Road's Bloomingdale Branch that I just mentioned, actually northwest of downtown. Here is an interesting history:
https://forgottenchicago.com/features/the-bloomingdale-line/

Dennis Storzek


Re: NYC’s Westside High Line Advertisement

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Sat, Apr 9, 2022 at 06:02 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
There is an abandoned high line in Chicago due west from the downtown area right?
That would be the Milwaukee Road's Bloomingdale Branch that I just mentioned, actually northwest of downtown. Here is an interesting history:
https://forgottenchicago.com/features/the-bloomingdale-line/

Dennis Storzek


FDDM&S caboose and DCI boxcar

ron christensen
 

Boughten pictures no more information
 They are in Des Moines I believe.
Ron Christensen


Re: NYC’s Westside High Line Advertisement

Tim O'Connor
 


There is an abandoned high line in Chicago due west from the downtown area right?
And Philadelphia has the Reading's abandoned high line into Reading Terminal on Market Street.
Which is now a giant food market underneath the tracks.


On 4/8/2022 5:32 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Fri, Apr 8, 2022 at 01:35 PM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

There is no direct equivalent in Chicago but most all the railroads within city limits were grade separated from 1890-1920.

This required railroads and industries to reconfigure their sidings as most tracks were raised to about the second story level of existing buildings to allow city streets to pass under the railroads in slightly depressed viaducts.

Charlie,

I'm no expert on the Milwaukee Road, but I doubt their elevated line along Bloomingdale Ave. between Tower A5 and Pacific Jct. ever saw passenger service, it seemed to just feed the industrial area along the North Branch of the Chicago River. That, I think, is as close as Chicago comes to the West Side line in New York.

Dennis Storzek


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: FORGOTTEN TREASURES

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Apr 8, 2022, at 11:57, Dennis Storzek <dennis@...> wrote:

On Fri, Apr 8, 2022 at 11:00 AM, Tom Madden wrote:
As I understand it the software added these lines. Is this the same style used (presumably hand-drawn) by JHG and (presumably with CAD) by Hundman?
I doubt the software added the lines automatically, but AutoCAD's OFFSET command would make it quick and easy. I'm sure Chuck had a distance firmly in mind that he knew would make the two pen strokes overlap, thus yielding a heavier line. This assuming the output device was a pen plotter (remember those?)
A friend gave me a Calcomp to connect to the PDP-11/20 he'd earlier given me; unfortunately I had neither the power at home for the computer nor an interface for the plotter, ao I donated the plotter to the neighborhood school and enshrined the computer in my budding personal museum. I'm about ready to part it out.
--
Willie was a chemist,
Now Willie is no more.
What Willie thought was H2O
Was H2SO4


Re: NYC’s Westside High Line Advertisement

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Fri, Apr 8, 2022 at 01:35 PM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

There is no direct equivalent in Chicago but most all the railroads within city limits were grade separated from 1890-1920.

This required railroads and industries to reconfigure their sidings as most tracks were raised to about the second story level of existing buildings to allow city streets to pass under the railroads in slightly depressed viaducts.

Charlie,

I'm no expert on the Milwaukee Road, but I doubt their elevated line along Bloomingdale Ave. between Tower A5 and Pacific Jct. ever saw passenger service, it seemed to just feed the industrial area along the North Branch of the Chicago River. That, I think, is as close as Chicago comes to the West Side line in New York.

Dennis Storzek

 


Re: URTX 5474/Oscar Mayer Meat Reefer With Flat End

Tim O'Connor
 


Also built for M&StL

On 4/8/2022 4:51 PM, ROGER HINMAN via groups.io wrote:
General American built this type of car in the thirties and their flat end was first introduced on the 50’ rfgr cars that look like passenger rfgr but weren’t. They then applied some of the features of those cars to GPEX steel milk cars and some standard freight rfgr. This may have been a reassignment of the URTX 81000 rfgr cars built in 1936 by GACCo for the Milwaukee road. (picture and plans in the 1940 Car Builder’s Cycle)


Roger Hinman

On Apr 8, 2022, at 1:35 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

URTX 5474/Oscar Mayer Meat Reefer With Flat End
The car:
Photo taken in 1952. Part of series 5300-5499.
This series is listed in the January 1945 Equipment register but I have no information on when these cars were built.
I was mildly surprised to see a flat end on this steel-sheathed reefer, but maybe this feature is more common than I imagined.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: URTX 5474/Oscar Mayer Meat Reefer With Flat End

ROGER HINMAN
 

General American built this type of car in the thirties and their flat end was first introduced on the 50’ rfgr cars that look like passenger rfgr but weren’t. They then applied some of the features of those cars to GPEX steel milk cars and some standard freight rfgr. This may have been a reassignment of the URTX 81000 rfgr cars built in 1936 by GACCo for the Milwaukee road. (picture and plans in the 1940 Car Builder’s Cycle)


Roger Hinman

On Apr 8, 2022, at 1:35 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

URTX 5474/Oscar Mayer Meat Reefer With Flat End
The car:
Photo taken in 1952. Part of series 5300-5499.
This series is listed in the January 1945 Equipment register but I have no information on when these cars were built.
I was mildly surprised to see a flat end on this steel-sheathed reefer, but maybe this feature is more common than I imagined.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Double Truss Truck [was] Questions about IMRC GN 12 panel box car and Trix UP B50-27 ACR Box car.

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Fri, Apr 8, 2022 at 01:08 PM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

I am not understanding the concept…

…if the casting is one piece how does the front truss react differently with the spring pack than the rear truss?

Charlie,

It's a one piece casting, but, think of how the forces flow through that casting. The common (for the time) cast sideframe had a flat beam section under the spring pack, supported at each end by the diagonals that ran to the top of the journals. That corner was a stress concentrator which was prone to cracking. A lot of trucks of the late twenties era had big bulbous protrusions at these corners because of this (PRR was good for this). The double truss design added another route for these stresses on the centerline of the casting, straight from underneath the center of the spring pack to over the journal. The springs bear on a widened part of the casting, but this new "truss" (actually just another rib on the casting) transfers the weight directly to the journal, bypassing the bending forces at the corner. A stronger sideframe was the result.

Dennis Storzek

 


Re: NYC’s Westside High Line Advertisement

Charlie Vlk
 

Bob-

There is no direct equivalent in Chicago but most all the railroads within city limits were grade separated from 1890-1920.

This required railroads and industries to reconfigure their sidings as most tracks were raised to about the second story level of existing buildings to allow city streets to pass under the railroads in slightly depressed viaducts.

In some situations the railroad could ramp down to spurs but many industries had to be connected at the new track level. Most of the track that was depressed was not very deep so sidings could be ramped up to the former levels.

The track along the alignment of the  “St. Charles Air Line” used by the C&NW, CB&Q, B&O and Soo Line south of the downtown area look most like the High Line but do not have any buildings built over the track…mostly Cold Storage and Transfer warehouses built after the track elevation between the CB&Q and on either side of the C&NW/B&O/Soo tracks.   The Soo built an elevated freight house south and west of Chicago Union Station and that is the only elevated one in Chicago proper of major consequence.

The Chicago Track Elevation project was done almost entirely with private railroad capital and, for Chicago, with a comparatively low level of graft and high degree of cooperation with the city government.   It involved massive rearrangements of main lines and, in several instances, raising entire freight and passenger yards…..all under heavy traffic with each project taking a couple of years.  This was all done with steam shovels, horses and men, with some rail mounted equipment such as side dump cars and Lidgerwood scraper unloading of gondolas carrying fill material. 

Shortly after the track elevation project the straightening of the Chicago River south of Union Station was undertaken which involved reconfiguration of the approach to B&O Grand Central Depot and moving bridges and rebuilding of yards on both sides of the river. 

If the conditions that exist today were in place in 1890 most of the work would still be in the neighborhood forum and environmental study stages and all the funding would be taxpayer money.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 8, 2022 11:44 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] NYC’s Westside High Line Advertisement

 

NYC’s Westside High Line Advertisement

In 1933 the first train ran on the High Line—which was then called the “West Side Elevated Line.” The line was fully operational by 1934, transporting millions of tons of meat, dairy, and produce. The lines cut directly through some buildings, creating easy access for factories like the National Biscuit Company (aka Nabisco), which is now the home of Chelsea Market.

Railroad traffic declined due to the rise in trucking. The southernmost section of the High Line, from Spring to Bank Streets, was demolished in the 1960s. The decline continued through the 1970s, with all traffic stopped by the early 1980s.

Today the High Line is a linear public park with displays of public art.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Double Truss Truck [was] Questions about IMRC GN 12 panel box car and Trix UP B50-27 ACR Box car.

Charlie Vlk
 

Dennis-

I am not understanding the concept…

…if the casting is one piece how does the front truss react differently with the spring pack than the rear truss?

How is the spring pack supported by the truss(es) at their bases?   Do the springs behind the front row somehow respond differently to the front ones? 

Is it somehow related to the “three legged stool” effect of three contact points which maybe tends to better maintain the sideframe/bolster orientation?

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, April 8, 2022 12:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Double Truss Truck [was] Questions about IMRC GN 12 panel box car and Trix UP B50-27 ACR Box car.

 

On Fri, Apr 8, 2022 at 09:28 AM, mopacfirst wrote:

The first truss is the steel casting that we can easily see, the outboard portion of the sideframe.  The second truss, then, is behind the first one and an integral part of the same casting but which integrates with the spring package and the bolster in a different way than the first.  You gotta hand it to 1920s marketing guys to come up with this term, but it does appear to do what the ad claims it does, namely support the spring pack in an additional and different way.

Precisely. Here is their diagram with color added for clarity:



BLUE = truss used in almost all cast trucks
RED  =  added second truss
PURPLE = common top chord

Dennis Storzek


Re: Hinckley & Schmitt water car

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 


Hi Ron and List Members,
 
Thanks Ron for posting this image.
 
Is this a steel tank, or a wooden tank? I don't see any rivets on the tank, nor do I see indications of wooden boards or staves on the tank...
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 08, 2022 3:08 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hinckley & Schmitt water car

I found this picture in a group of unsorted pictures.
 I did not take the picture, probably bought it.
It was with a group of Iowa pictures. There wasn't anything written on the back.
HSTX 1008
Ron Christensen

3661 - 3680 of 195445