Date   

Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Bernd Schroeder
 
Edited

hi all,

for beet modelling in HO, some of the european groups use red clover seeds.

Bernd

Adelsdorf, Germany



--
Diese Nachricht wurde von meinem Android Mobiltelefon mit GMX Mail gesendet.
Am 07.05.22, 19:09 schrieb "Richard Townsend via groups.io" <richtownsend@...>:

The main problem with anise seeds, other than their attractiveness to pests, is that they are way oversized for HO. I’ve been looking for something else for a long time but haven’t come up with anything yet. If I do come up with something I intend to make some loads and then cast them to eliminate the pest problem.

 

On May 7, 2022, at 9:55 AM, Peter Hall <petehall6369@...> wrote:

Anise seeds are very aromatic.  I’ve had a jar of them “off-gassing” for years, and I can still smell them.  I believe they would have to be sealed some way - perhaps with liquid floor wax or several coats of Dullcoat.  I haven’t tried any method yet.

Thanks
Pete

On May 7, 2022, at 7:38 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:
A friend used Anise seeds for a beet train, and after a few months the cars were infested with bugs. If you use Anise seeds, you better treat them to discourage bugs. Perhaps run them through an alcohol dehydration series, or treat them with something repellent or toxic to bugs.
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Betz
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2022 5:49 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale
 
Pete,
  I know one SP modeler who swears by Anise seeds for sugar beet loads ... Jim in the PNW

 


Re: Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

Nelson Moyer
 

I missed the Scotch reference. Affordable single malt is an oxymoron. I’m partial to Lagavulin 16 year old single malt, but only around holidays.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Adams
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2022 1:47 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

 

Thanks for all the comments about my grab iron hole drilling. My tools  and drilling setup are shown below.

My only explanation is that I might have gotten a bad batch of Gyros #78 drill bits.  I have never had such bad results as this before. I have been drilling grab iron holes since the 1980's. 
They last 4 were drilled with a #76 bit which did not break after 10/12 twists.  Note that I am using a Mascot twist drill with non rotating wood handle. Boelube (from Boeing development) was used on every new bit and when cleared. The holes and bits were cleared of plastic regularly as I drilled.  I have not had problems with Gyros bits before and found them to last often beyond one project.  I am now done with the 72 holes. The grab irons have been inserted and secured with Plasti-Zap Medium CA from behind. I will probably let primer and paint coats fill the gaps in the grab iron holes. 

 The next challenge is cutting the bolt heads off 72 Grandt Line 3/4 nut to glue above the grab irons.  Unfortunately my pipette glue applicator is clogged. Soaking in IPA now.

And I usually drink Irish whiskey not Scotch (unless I happen on an excellent single malt at an affordable price.)

My plan for the future is only build kits of more modern cars that have ladders not grab irons for reaching the car roof. 


--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2xx may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

Nelson Moyer
 

Your pin  vise raised red flags for me. It’s too big and heavy, and the ball anchors it in your palm, so you don’t have fine fingertip control. I recommend a couple of Starrett sizes. I’m also using an old Ehrlinger slip ring pin vise that was my ‘go to’ for small bits until the chuck wore down so that it won’t hold bits smaller than #76. I ordered a replacement two years ago, but the chuck was acentric, so I sent it back. I tried again a year later with the same result. Apparently Swiss precision has slipped since I bought the first one.

 

Look at the pin vise posts on resincarbuilders group for other recommendations. Bottom line, you fingers should control the bit, not the palm of your hand. No wonder you break bits.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Adams
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2022 1:47 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

 

Thanks for all the comments about my grab iron hole drilling. My tools  and drilling setup are shown below.

My only explanation is that I might have gotten a bad batch of Gyros #78 drill bits.  I have never had such bad results as this before. I have been drilling grab iron holes since the 1980's. 
They last 4 were drilled with a #76 bit which did not break after 10/12 twists.  Note that I am using a Mascot twist drill with non rotating wood handle. Boelube (from Boeing development) was used on every new bit and when cleared. The holes and bits were cleared of plastic regularly as I drilled.  I have not had problems with Gyros bits before and found them to last often beyond one project.  I am now done with the 72 holes. The grab irons have been inserted and secured with Plasti-Zap Medium CA from behind. I will probably let primer and paint coats fill the gaps in the grab iron holes. 

 The next challenge is cutting the bolt heads off 72 Grandt Line 3/4 nut to glue above the grab irons.  Unfortunately my pipette glue applicator is clogged. Soaking in IPA now.

And I usually drink Irish whiskey not Scotch (unless I happen on an excellent single malt at an affordable price.)

My plan for the future is only build kits of more modern cars that have ladders not grab irons for reaching the car roof. 


--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2xx may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

Ken Adams
 

Thanks for all the comments about my grab iron hole drilling. My tools  and drilling setup are shown below.

My only explanation is that I might have gotten a bad batch of Gyros #78 drill bits.  I have never had such bad results as this before. I have been drilling grab iron holes since the 1980's. 
They last 4 were drilled with a #76 bit which did not break after 10/12 twists.  Note that I am using a Mascot twist drill with non rotating wood handle. Boelube (from Boeing development) was used on every new bit and when cleared. The holes and bits were cleared of plastic regularly as I drilled.  I have not had problems with Gyros bits before and found them to last often beyond one project.  I am now done with the 72 holes. The grab irons have been inserted and secured with Plasti-Zap Medium CA from behind. I will probably let primer and paint coats fill the gaps in the grab iron holes. 

 The next challenge is cutting the bolt heads off 72 Grandt Line 3/4 nut to glue above the grab irons.  Unfortunately my pipette glue applicator is clogged. Soaking in IPA now.

And I usually drink Irish whiskey not Scotch (unless I happen on an excellent single malt at an affordable price.)

My plan for the future is only build kits of more modern cars that have ladders not grab irons for reaching the car roof. 


--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2xx may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Dave Lawler
 

I recently bought some tiny beads from an outfit called FIRE MOUNTAIN GEMS on line to make HO insulators for line poles. They have about a zillion different kind/sizes of beads.
You might be able to find what you are looking for there to make a pattern for molding by epoxying them to a base. It's interesting to look at all the stuff in their online catalog.
Dave lawler
Avon Lake, Ohio


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Richard Townsend
 

The main problem with anise seeds, other than their attractiveness to pests, is that they are way oversized for HO. I’ve been looking for something else for a long time but haven’t come up with anything yet. If I do come up with something I intend to make some loads and then cast them to eliminate the pest problem.


On May 7, 2022, at 9:55 AM, Peter Hall <petehall6369@...> wrote:

Anise seeds are very aromatic.  I’ve had a jar of them “off-gassing” for years, and I can still smell them.  I believe they would have to be sealed some way - perhaps with liquid floor wax or several coats of Dullcoat.  I haven’t tried any method yet.

Thanks
Pete

On May 7, 2022, at 7:38 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

A friend used Anise seeds for a beet train, and after a few months the cars were infested with bugs. If you use Anise seeds, you better treat them to discourage bugs. Perhaps run them through an alcohol dehydration series, or treat them with something repellent or toxic to bugs.
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Betz
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2022 5:49 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale
 
Pete,
  I know one SP modeler who swears by Anise seeds for sugar beet loads ... Jim in the PNW



Re: Bill Welch document

Dave Parker
 

Have the Admins set a size limit for uploaded files?  I see that the largest one so far is 16 MB.

I don't have Bill's article on plastic cars, but would note that his Feb 2008 piece on the FGEX consortium, which is 81 pages, is only a 11.9 MB file.

PDFs usually aren't that big.  I just took my largest, most photo-intensive PowerPoint clinic with a file size of 121 MB, and converted it to a PDF that is only 15.6 MB.  Many (most) email apps allow attachments up to 25 MB.

YMMV of course.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Peter Hall
 

Anise seeds are very aromatic.  I’ve had a jar of them “off-gassing” for years, and I can still smell them.  I believe they would have to be sealed some way - perhaps with liquid floor wax or several coats of Dullcoat.  I haven’t tried any method yet.

Thanks
Pete

On May 7, 2022, at 7:38 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

A friend used Anise seeds for a beet train, and after a few months the cars were infested with bugs. If you use Anise seeds, you better treat them to discourage bugs. Perhaps run them through an alcohol dehydration series, or treat them with something repellent or toxic to bugs.
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Betz
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2022 5:49 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale
 
Pete,
  I know one SP modeler who swears by Anise seeds for sugar beet loads ... Jim in the PNW



Re: Bill Welch document

Bill Keene
 

WeTransfer is also a very good service … easy to use … and free.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


Re: Bill Welch document

Jeff Helm
 

Dropbox works very well for large files
--
Cheers

Jeff Helm
The Olympic Peninsula Branch
https://olympicpeninsulabranch.blogspot.com/


Re: Unpainted roofs a new method (to me at least)

Bill Keene
 

Charlie, Lookin’ Good!

Thank you for adding to my meager modeling knowledge base. 

Cheers & Happy Modeling
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 7, 2022, at 6:37 AM, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:

 Ed Hawkins and I exchanged emails on the roofs on the CB&Q 40’ Intermountain boxcar I’m building.  The car built by the railroad are thought to have been unpainted galvanized panels. The ribs were steel and being prone to rust were (probably) painted.  I wanted to break up the colors of the panels slightly and used Vallejo white, sea grey and blue to vary the hues.  Obviously some of the grey paint ended up on the ribs so I used a sewing needle in a pin vise and was able to scribe it along the raised area of the rib and the flat panel.  This cleaned up the paint and I could use the pin to scrape off any paint on the rib as well. 

Here’s a couple images. 

<C9A6CBEE-1719-438D-908C-7B95FDDC9B41.jpeg><4173B4AA-721F-430E-AC6A-937F36319C8F.jpeg>
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



Re: Bill Welch document

 

Dropbox?

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On May 7, 2022, at 9:54 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



I have a number of Bill Welch PDF files but they are huge - much too large for email or the list.


On 5/7/2022 12:35 AM, Jared Harper wrote:
I am looking for Bill Welch's Plastic Freight Car Builders, Part I.  Could someone please send me a copy.

Thanks.

Jared Harper


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Craig Wilson
 

A friend of mine had a layout based on a railroad that shipped taconite in ore cars via car ferry during the winter months when the lakes were iced over.  He made loads out of seeds (maybe Anise, I don't recall) that he thought looked very good.

One night he was in the basement and heard strange noises.  Upon investigation he found his car ferry model with ore cars derailed and. jammed up in the stern.  Yep . . . a mouse had gotten in and got trapped when chowing down on the seeds.  Fortunately he discovered this before the critter chewed a hole in the side of his prized car ferry model to escape.  After tracking down where mice were getting in, the seed loads were discarded and he looked for other solutions to model the loads.

So it is not just bugs.  Any potential food source can attract unwelcome visitors.

Craig Wilson


Re: Bill Welch document

Tim O'Connor
 


I have a number of Bill Welch PDF files but they are huge - much too large for email or the list.


On 5/7/2022 12:35 AM, Jared Harper wrote:
I am looking for Bill Welch's Plastic Freight Car Builders, Part I.  Could someone please send me a copy.

Thanks.

Jared Harper


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

Brad Andonian
 

Love the model!


I keep a spoon of olive oil for lubing.    Have also used Ed-40.


Re: Unpainted roofs a new method (to me at least)

Nelson Moyer
 

The base color looks really good for fresh galvanized metal. Dirty it up with weathering and I think you’re right on.

 

From the photos of painted ribs on unpainted roofs, the painters weren’t too fastidious about straight lines, so a little slop is prototypical. I’ve used a black fine tip marker for ribs coated with car cement.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2022 8:38 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Unpainted roofs a new method (to me at least)

 

 Ed Hawkins and I exchanged emails on the roofs on the CB&Q 40’ Intermountain boxcar I’m building.  The car built by the railroad are thought to have been unpainted galvanized panels. The ribs were steel and being prone to rust were (probably) painted.  I wanted to break up the colors of the panels slightly and used Vallejo white, sea grey and blue to vary the hues.  Obviously some of the grey paint ended up on the ribs so I used a sewing needle in a pin vise and was able to scribe it along the raised area of the rib and the flat panel.  This cleaned up the paint and I could use the pin to scrape off any paint on the rib as well. 

Here’s a couple images. 


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Unpainted roofs a new method (to me at least)

O Fenton Wells
 

Good stuff Charlie, thanks for sharing
Fenton

On Sat, May 7, 2022 at 9:38 AM Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:

 Ed Hawkins and I exchanged emails on the roofs on the CB&Q 40’ Intermountain boxcar I’m building.  The car built by the railroad are thought to have been unpainted galvanized panels. The ribs were steel and being prone to rust were (probably) painted.  I wanted to break up the colors of the panels slightly and used Vallejo white, sea grey and blue to vary the hues.  Obviously some of the grey paint ended up on the ribs so I used a sewing needle in a pin vise and was able to scribe it along the raised area of the rib and the flat panel.  This cleaned up the paint and I could use the pin to scrape off any paint on the rib as well. 

Here’s a couple images. 


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

 

IIRC, mice also like them.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, May 7, 2022 at 7:38 AM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

 

A friend used Anise seeds for a beet train, and after a few months the cars were infested with bugs. If you use Anise seeds, you better treat them to discourage bugs. Perhaps run them through an alcohol dehydration series, or treat them with something repellent or toxic to bugs.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Betz
Sent: Saturday, May 7, 2022 5:49 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

 

Pete,
  I know one SP modeler who swears by Anise seeds for sugar beet loads ... Jim in the PNW


Re: Unpainted roofs a new method (to me at least)

Paul Doggett
 

Charlie 

That’s really great work.

Paul Doggett 


On 7 May 2022, at 14:38, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:



 Ed Hawkins and I exchanged emails on the roofs on the CB&Q 40’ Intermountain boxcar I’m building.  The car built by the railroad are thought to have been unpainted galvanized panels. The ribs were steel and being prone to rust were (probably) painted.  I wanted to break up the colors of the panels slightly and used Vallejo white, sea grey and blue to vary the hues.  Obviously some of the grey paint ended up on the ribs so I used a sewing needle in a pin vise and was able to scribe it along the raised area of the rib and the flat panel.  This cleaned up the paint and I could use the pin to scrape off any paint on the rib as well. 

Here’s a couple images. 

C9A6CBEE-1719-438D-908C-7B95FDDC9B41.jpeg4173B4AA-721F-430E-AC6A-937F36319C8F.jpeg
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Unpainted roofs a new method (to me at least)

Charlie Duckworth
 

 Ed Hawkins and I exchanged emails on the roofs on the CB&Q 40’ Intermountain boxcar I’m building.  The car built by the railroad are thought to have been unpainted galvanized panels. The ribs were steel and being prone to rust were (probably) painted.  I wanted to break up the colors of the panels slightly and used Vallejo white, sea grey and blue to vary the hues.  Obviously some of the grey paint ended up on the ribs so I used a sewing needle in a pin vise and was able to scribe it along the raised area of the rib and the flat panel.  This cleaned up the paint and I could use the pin to scrape off any paint on the rib as well. 

Here’s a couple images. 


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

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