Date   

Re: Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

Nelson Moyer
 

Charlie, you consistently set the bar over the top when it comes to board weathering. The roof is also a really nice touch.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2022 8:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

 

Growing up in Kansas City I remember my folks hitting the local railroad salvage store to see what had survived the latest derailment.  Here’s my own railroad salvage; a Red Caboose Mather reefer that’s taken 10-12 years of ops sessions abuse.  It was missing the vertical brake staff, several of the steps were missing (one survived) but it was the only Mather reefer on the layout and the leasee name was accurate.  Looking at Ted’s refrigerator car book I added Andrews trucks and airbrushed the carbody with a thinned down coat of Dullcote with a few drops of black and brown added.  After the Dullcote dried I scraped off a few boards to show those being replaced and darkened a couple others for grain variations.  Ted’s book showed a Mather car with some of the paint peaking off the side of the panels so I tried to replicate that with a light gray. 



--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

Charlie Duckworth
 

Growing up in Kansas City I remember my folks hitting the local railroad salvage store to see what had survived the latest derailment.  Here’s my own railroad salvage; a Red Caboose Mather reefer that’s taken 10-12 years of ops sessions abuse.  It was missing the vertical brake staff, several of the steps were missing (one survived) but it was the only Mather reefer on the layout and the leasee name was accurate.  Looking at Ted’s refrigerator car book I added Andrews trucks and airbrushed the carbody with a thinned down coat of Dullcote with a few drops of black and brown added.  After the Dullcote dried I scraped off a few boards to show those being replaced and darkened a couple others for grain variations.  Ted’s book showed a Mather car with some of the paint peaking off the side of the panels so I tried to replicate that with a light gray. 



--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: 8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

vapeurchapelon
 

Many thanks to all repliers! Tim, of course I am aware of the very nice OMI 4000gal car - they called it "Nice & Timy", and I would own one since a long time when it wasn't a 1960s car.
 
Steve, unfortunately this is what I feared. Replacing running boards and platform wouldn't be impossible, but definitely no joy...
 
Thanks again to all.
 
Johannes
 
Gesendet: Dienstag, 10. Mai 2022 um 20:16 Uhr
Von: "Steve and Barb Hile" <shile@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] 8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

It seems like the dome platform and running boards are supposed to represent an open grid with the raised rectangles, like Apex or Blaw Knox, not a solid piece.  Steel running boards and platforms need a way for water to drain and not puddle.

 

My 2 cents.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of vapeurchapelon
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2022 9:52 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] 8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

 

Hello friends,

as some of you know I love brass models even though todays plastic and resin models are superior in detail. It's kind of nostalgic gush.
I found a very rare model:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/275306405690?hash=item40198a5f3a:g:A3MAAOSwLVNielG0

Aside of its incompleteness of some detail and crudeness of some other detail - is it otherwise a proportionally accurate representation of the prototype?
I easily could add train line, brake hoses, coupler lift bars, piping between valve, reservoir and cylinder, and I would replace the steps. No problem.
But should the running boards and platform be perforated? THAT would be too much and the reason to let the model go.

Many thanks

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954

 


Re: 8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

Steve and Barb Hile
 

It seems like the dome platform and running boards are supposed to represent an open grid with the raised rectangles, like Apex or Blaw Knox, not a solid piece.  Steel running boards and platforms need a way for water to drain and not puddle.

 

My 2 cents.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of vapeurchapelon
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2022 9:52 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] 8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

 

Hello friends,

as some of you know I love brass models even though todays plastic and resin models are superior in detail. It's kind of nostalgic gush.
I found a very rare model:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/275306405690?hash=item40198a5f3a:g:A3MAAOSwLVNielG0

Aside of its incompleteness of some detail and crudeness of some other detail - is it otherwise a proportionally accurate representation of the prototype?
I easily could add train line, brake hoses, coupler lift bars, piping between valve, reservoir and cylinder, and I would replace the steps. No problem.
But should the running boards and platform be perforated? THAT would be too much and the reason to let the model go.

Many thanks

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954


Re: Grain Transportation In the Northwest

Chuck Soule
 

After the merger and construction of the large concrete grain elevators at the location of the original Tacoma Wharf, Half Moon Yard acted as a major location for grain cars.  I don't know how much it was used for grain in NP days.  It probably was used to stage grain cars to the Sperry Mill and its predecessors, and maybe also cars for the Tacoma Smelter and sawmills along Ruston Way.  I know in the late 60s it had a lot of white-lined cars waiting to make their last trip up the hill to the South Tacoma Shops.  I also seem to recall from my very brief tenure as a clerk in the Tacoma Yard that most of the traffic in 1969 was being switched and staged out of the Head of Bay yard, and Half Moon Yard was mostly used for storage of empties.

Regarding Portland, the Portland Board of Trades acted as an exchange for wheat trading in the general pre-Depression era.  I don't know about its subsequent history, nor do I know any specifics about grain car staging in the general Portland area.

Chuck Soule


Re: 8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

Tim O'Connor
 


Here's another 4,000 gallon car, built by GATC.


On 5/10/2022 11:40 AM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io wrote:

Hi Johannes,

I looked at the box label which says it is a "ICC 103 D W" tank car.  It looks more like an ICC 103BW, which would likely be a rubber-lined uninsulated car used for shipping acids and other corrosives.  The 8000 gallon capacity and double domes make it an especially appealing model.  It looks pretty accurate, although I don't have any photos of a suitable prototype.  It looks to be a GAT design, but other experts may chime in on that.

Todd Sullivan

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: 8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

Tim O'Connor
 

Johannes

In most respects the model resembles an "upsized" version of a 4,000 gallon prototype that was imported
in brass by Overland Models (OMI #3123) in the late 1980's.

Two dome cars over 6,000 gallons in size are incredibly rare. Here's a photo of GATX 25945 of unknown
construction date. It has 8,028 gallons capacity.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/10/2022 10:51 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:

Hello friends,

as some of you know I love brass models even though todays plastic and resin models are superior in detail. It's kind of nostalgic gush.
I found a very rare model:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/275306405690?hash=item40198a5f3a:g:A3MAAOSwLVNielG0

Aside of its incompleteness of some detail and crudeness of some other detail - is it otherwise a proportionally accurate representation of the prototype?
I easily could add train line, brake hoses, coupler lift bars, piping between valve, reservoir and cylinder, and I would replace the steps. No problem.
But should the running boards and platform be perforated? THAT would be too much and the reason to let the model go.

Many thanks

Johannes

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: 8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Johannes,

I looked at the box label which says it is a "ICC 103 D W" tank car.  It looks more like an ICC 103BW, which would likely be a rubber-lined uninsulated car used for shipping acids and other corrosives.  The 8000 gallon capacity and double domes make it an especially appealing model.  It looks pretty accurate, although I don't have any photos of a suitable prototype.  It looks to be a GAT design, but other experts may chime in on that.

Todd Sullivan


8000 gal. ICC 103-D-W tank car question

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello friends,

as some of you know I love brass models even though todays plastic and resin models are superior in detail. It's kind of nostalgic gush.
I found a very rare model:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/275306405690?hash=item40198a5f3a:g:A3MAAOSwLVNielG0

Aside of its incompleteness of some detail and crudeness of some other detail - is it otherwise a proportionally accurate representation of the prototype?
I easily could add train line, brake hoses, coupler lift bars, piping between valve, reservoir and cylinder, and I would replace the steps. No problem.
But should the running boards and platform be perforated? THAT would be too much and the reason to let the model go.

Many thanks

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1954


Hopper mini-kits

Eric Hansmann
 

Resin Car Works has new Mini-Kits to upgrade HO scale hopper models for Frisco, NC&StL, and NYC prototypes. Details are in the latest RCW blog post. 
http://blog.resincarworks.com/new-hopper-mini-kits/

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


Re: Question (off topic))

Danny Inmon
 

modelintermodal@groups.io


Grain Transportation In the Northwest

Bob Chaparro
 

Grain Transportation In the Northwest

Courtesy of Chris Frissell, here is a 1964 USDA document for those of you with an interest in grain transportation by rail and other means.

The coverage reaches back well before 1964.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA 


Re: Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

Curt Fortenberry
 


I've bought these drills off of ebay.  They say used but I've never had a dull one, and the thick shank eliminates which holder I use.  I always have my wax block nearby to lubricate.  I've only ever broken one in resin kits, never had one break using it on plastic.  All hand held chucks.

Curt Fortenberry

https://www.ebay.com/itm/165010445835


Re: Question (off topic))

Hudson Leighton
 


Question (off topic))

Larry Smith
 

Is there a modern freight car group on io.  I need to get some info from them on piggyback cars.

Larry Smith


Re: Refrigerator Cars - Salt Water Drippings

np328
 

     My uncle Joe McGrath was a civil engineer who worked for the Milwaukee Road (around the Chicago area) for part of his career. He mentioned that the Milwaukee would keep the loaded iced reefers on one track where double track existed. That like prior commenters above have posted, to keep corrosion on track switch components and bridge structures to where they could be more readily checked. He also talked about moments of motion when designing trestles and such that - the locomotives and more over cars - which we talk about modeling on this site. This was all was very entertaining, however perhaps wasted on my brother and I as we were teenagers then and while the topic was interesting, it remained in our brains as long as anything does with teenagers. Perhaps some here who worked on the Milwaukee Road would remember more. 
   
      However, I do recall reading in older Railway Ages about the roadbed cinders produced by steam locomotives and the brine becoming "batteries" and affecting signaling circuits with false currents.
                                                          That I think, could well be a driving force to contain the brine.                                                                      James Dick     Roseville, MN 


Re: B&O m-15k & M-15n

Brian Carlson
 

Thanks Chris. I absentmindedly forgot about the RPC.

 I’m pondering if I can create a M-15N from the F&C M—15k with a new underframe. I fear the resin thickness might be an issue 

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 8, 2022, at 6:51 AM, Chris Barkan <cplbarkan@...> wrote:

Following is a brief synopsis of the B&O's M-15 rebuilding programs.

The M-15K/L/M subclasses were rebuilt 1936, 1937, and 1939, using steel underframes from M-15 double-sheathed boxcars by replacing the wooden body with steel, wagontop bodies.
     M-15K, 1,240 cars rebuilt 1936-37 as single door wagontop cars 370000-371249 with an inside height of 10’0”.
     M-15L, 50 cars rebuilt 1937. Double door version of wagontop M-15 rebuild. 379000-370049 with inside height 10’0”. 
     M-15M, 180 cars rebuilt 1939.  These were extended height, double door wagontops in series 294000-294179 with an inside height of 10’4” and equipped with Evans auto loaders.
 
All of the M-15K and M-15L wagontop rebuilds had their fishbelly underframes replaced in the mid-1950s and were reclassified as M-15N, M-15NA, M-15NB, M-15P dependent on the combination of door width, capacity and which class they were rebuilt from.
     M-15N  400 cars (from M-15K) received new UFs in 1955 and renumbered 374000-374399, 40 ton capacity, 6 foot doors.
     M-15NA  376 cars (from M-15K) received new UFs in 1956 and renumbered 374500-374875, 40 ton capacity, 8 foot doors.
     M-15NB  47 cars (from M-15L) received new UFs in 1956 and renumbered 374900-374946, 40 ton capacity, 8 foot doors.
     M-15P  400 cars (from M-15K) received new UFs in 1955 and renumbered 375000-375399, 50 ton capacity, 6 foot doors.
     M-15PD  309 cars (from M-15NA) received higher capacity trucks (50 ton) and renumbered 376000-376351.
     M-15PE  42 cars (from M-15NB) received higher capacity trucks (50 ton) and renumbered 377000-377046.

As I used to say when giving presentations on this topic, these cars resembled George Washington's axe.  First the B&O retained the underframe and replaced the carbody, and later they retained the carbody and replaced the underframe.

After the 2nd rebuilding, they superficially resembled the M-63, which were the wagon-top boxcars built new, but those all had Duryea underframes while none of the M-15 classes ever did.

Although we have the very nice ExactRail M-53s, we do not have good plastic models of any of the M-15 classes. 
--
Chris Barkan
Champaign, IL

--
Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: Westerfield NYC 1916 Modernized boxcar off the workbench

Ken Adams
 

I have a collection of battery and low power drills and screwdrivers that mount collets.  None were workable for drilling grab iron mounting holes. As Nelson pointed out above, these tools are too heavy for use with #78-#80 drill bits. I have a Starrett 240A Pin Vise l due from Amazon today. Unfortunately after I ordered it, I noticed comments about quality problems with the trueness of the collet in recent orders from Starrett.  Hopefully this will have better quality and will work.

As I have pointed out. I think I will confine my modeling in the future to box and other house cars from the 1940's on where ladders replaced separate grab irons. The Westerfield later NYC modernized rebuild looks like a promising kit. It has ladders.
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Christopher J. Palermo
 

I used cumin seeds affixed with matte medium and an overspray of Dullcote. I’ve never had insect or rodent problems. They require a wash of color as their natural state is too yellow-brown. They also require using cuticle scissors to clip off the hairlike root that extends from one end. A bit of a pain but it only takes about five minutes per load. I had not completed that step at the time of this photo. And I am aware that this load is too high … it was a first attempt at the technique.

Chris Palermo
Austin, Texas


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Lester Breuer
 

Anise seeds used for load.   Anise seeds over white glue on foam and when dried sprayed with lacquer.   Made when article regarding use appeared and never a problem with the mice.

Keep Modeling, Keep Sharing,
Lester Breuer

4561 - 4580 of 197031