Date   

Re: Application of K4 decals

Dave Boss
 

Hello 
            I have used K4 decals in the past and have found that just wetting the decal as usual then placing the decal near the place of setting. I then wait and test until the decal releases itself. Then I slide it into a puddle of Micro set on the car so the decal doesn't have the chance to wrinkle up. I position it fairly close to where I want it. Draw off the excess Micro set with a paper towel. Then I quickly tweak the decal to its final resting place. I let it set then coat it with Microsol to really seat the decal. This has worked for me so far. I will be using the K4 decals soon on another car I'm working on so I'll find out because this will be a new sheet, and maybe they mite have changed their decals? Hope this may help you

Good Day
Dave


On Wednesday, May 11, 2022, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:
Chuck I experienced the same thing this week with the K$ decals and had to pick a corner and pull them off.  Once I did that they were fine.  But they did not float off as normal.Not sure what the issue is
Fenton

On Wed, May 11, 2022 at 12:06 PM Chuck Cover <chuck.cover@...> wrote:
Group,

I have some K4 decals and am having trouble in that the decals are very difficult to remove from the backing.  The instructions say to float in warm water for 20 seconds and remove before the decals release, however, I have found that even leaving them in the distilled water for over a minute does not loosen them. I have tried to used Microset to help this process without success.  The decals will not slide off the backing.  I have had to pry up a corner, and peal the decal off the paper, then try to place the decal on the model without having the film wrinkle. Has anyone used K4 decals and are there any tips?  Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM



--


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Robert kirkham
 

I wonder whether filters were a regular art of Delano’s style?  If yes, it would be useful to know what he might have used and the effect it had on the film.

Rob   

On May 11, 2022, at 6:44 PM, Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...> wrote:

Are the colors right or wrong.  Yes.

-Hudson <1a35342u.preview4x5 Kodachrome transparency by Alfred Palmer.jpg>


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Bill McClure
 

Delano used the very first Kodachrome, ASA 5 with its own color "palette". Every subsequent version of Kodachrome, from ISO(ASA) 10 to 25 to 200 had its own color palette and degree of saturation. There was a bias towards reds, whereas the various Ektachromes had a bias towards blues. And Fujifilm is a whole 'nother issue. Drawing conclusions about "real" color from slide films is dicey, more so when the original has been scanned, as in the Delano slides. We know nothing of the scanning process.

Best approach is to view relative color values against known hues, such as UP oxide red or PRR FCR.

Having said that, I love the color palette of all Delano images, whether "accurate" or not.

Bill


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Hudson Leighton
 

Are the colors right or wrong.  Yes.

-Hudson


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Bruce Smith
 

Eric, Rob,

Two other critical issues. One is color distortion by the film. Given that blue sky, I'm going to guess that it was Kodachrome 25 film, and as Paul Simon said, "it makes all the world a sunny day". The reds and yellows are enhanced by the film and are not true to color. In addition, these cars are beautifully weathered, and so any supposition as to the original color is probably not going to be too accurate.

This photo is among those that Richard Hendrickson used to support that steam era freight cars got really dirty. Not run-down abused, but DIRTY. Most steam era modelers do not weather enough.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Eric Hansmann <eric@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 11, 2022 8:57 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
I love the Jack Delano color images at the Library of Congress site. They have inspired my weathering efforts on many freight cars.

But, when we look deeper into these images I think we need to make adjustments. The original photo exposure takes into account the sky and background. IMHO, this makes the freight cars underexposed.This is especially true of the broader yard scenes in the Delano images.

I just edited the original TIF file to focus on the freight cars nearest the UP box car. After cropping, I adjusted the exposure and levels to produce the attached image.

The more exposed version brings out the color for additional comparison. Note the Michigan Central box car at the far right seems to be a closer match with the UP car color. There weren't any color adjustments to the original file, only exposure and levels were adjusted.

Is it proper to fool around with these images? I think we need to do this when we are reviewing and discussing a small portion of the larger image. YMMV.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 05/10/2022 10:49 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:


I’ve been a bit sick so whiling away down time, and wandered back into the Library of Congress Delano photos again. This time, I was a bit intrigued by a note on the Utah Rails sight that a photo showing Union Pacific freight car paint prior to 1944 might look like.  The answer (I think) is documented in a photo discussed on this list many times previously:https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878164/ which shows UP 471087 at the Illinois Central South Water St yard in Chicago, apparently taken April 1943.   With the large Tiff file, one can zoom in and see cars very well.  So for 1943 UP freight car colour, here’s some evidence:


What i think is useful here is the comparison with the GNR red, the IC brown, the very dark Rock Island brown, and the NYC/Michigan Central oxide brown colour.  Very cool.  I imagine there is a pan pastel shade for that yellow colour weathering on the far side panels?   

But I was also really taken by the GN car built 6 years earlier.  The painted roof seem caps, bare galvenized roof contrasting with rust blooming through the paint on the top end panel, dust collected on each rib on the car ends, the black paint on the ends faded to a grimy gray-brown, the wood sheathing worn and streaked and the reporting marks and See America logo faded and worn.    I wonder how many Resin Car Works models of this car show this much weathering . . . 


Mine is on the to do pile, and i think this will be my inspiration.

Rob



Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Robert kirkham
 

Great example of value shift within a single image. Thanks Dennis.  

Rob

On May 11, 2022, at 11:24 AM, Dennis Storzek <dennis@...> wrote:

On Wed, May 11, 2022 at 10:22 AM, Robert kirkham wrote:
I am uninformed on one point that makes me wonder: with the different black and white processes, my impression is that the conversion of colour to black and white is capable of changing relative “value” in the image.  Not sure.  Whether that matters in a single photo of multiple reddish brown cars - well, probably not?  But i’m not very confident about that.
It certainly does, because orthochromatic film will turn the yellow sides and FCR ends of a reefer the exact same shade of gray. Here is what a photography web site says about the issue:


Orthochromatic film is simply made with silver halide crystals, which are naturally blue-sensitive. First produced in 1873, early film photos and movies used orthochromatic film, which is the reason why skies in early photographs are almost always white: being blue, they overexposed easily. The orthochromatic film couldn’t see a red light, so anything red would turn black.

As technology and chemistry evolved, Panchromatic film was introduced around 1906 a was created with sensitizing dyes to extend the silver halide crystal sensitivity into the green and red portions of the spectrum. Panchromatic, meaning wide color, is now the popularly used film, capturing a wider spectrum of light, rending B&W tones close to what we see in everyday life.

While panchromatic film was invented in 1906, orthochromatic film continued in use for another two or three decades because of the extremely fine grain structure, so many builders photos were made using this film. We discussed the misrepresentation of color by this film in a discussion of some Baby Ruth reefers within the last year or so. I can't find a good railroad example, but here is how the Union Jack is rendered by orthochromatic film:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/36/Northernparty.png

Dennis Storzek

 
 


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Wed, May 11, 2022 at 10:22 AM, Robert kirkham wrote:
I am uninformed on one point that makes me wonder: with the different black and white processes, my impression is that the conversion of colour to black and white is capable of changing relative “value” in the image.  Not sure.  Whether that matters in a single photo of multiple reddish brown cars - well, probably not?  But i’m not very confident about that.
It certainly does, because orthochromatic film will turn the yellow sides and FCR ends of a reefer the exact same shade of gray. Here is what a photography web site says about the issue:


Orthochromatic film is simply made with silver halide crystals, which are naturally blue-sensitive. First produced in 1873, early film photos and movies used orthochromatic film, which is the reason why skies in early photographs are almost always white: being blue, they overexposed easily. The orthochromatic film couldn’t see a red light, so anything red would turn black.

As technology and chemistry evolved, Panchromatic film was introduced around 1906 a was created with sensitizing dyes to extend the silver halide crystal sensitivity into the green and red portions of the spectrum. Panchromatic, meaning wide color, is now the popularly used film, capturing a wider spectrum of light, rending B&W tones close to what we see in everyday life.

While panchromatic film was invented in 1906, orthochromatic film continued in use for another two or three decades because of the extremely fine grain structure, so many builders photos were made using this film. We discussed the misrepresentation of color by this film in a discussion of some Baby Ruth reefers within the last year or so. I can't find a good railroad example, but here is how the Union Jack is rendered by orthochromatic film:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/36/Northernparty.png

Dennis Storzek

 
 


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Robert kirkham
 

That’s a useful shot Tim.   Comparing with the Delano shot, i see the remaining paint as consistent with your conclusion that the colour is very light compared ot other RRs.  Also applies to the Michigan Central car. 

Black and white photos seem almost as useful as colour for relative differences between different RRs.   

I am uninformed on one point that makes me wonder: with the different black and white processes, my impression is that the conversion of colour to black and white is capable of changing relative “value” in the image.  Not sure.  Whether that matters in a single photo of multiple reddish brown cars - well, probably not?  But i’m not very confident about that.

Rob   

On May 11, 2022, at 9:37 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Rob

I think all I can say about that UP box car is that it is extremely filthy!

UP box cars were painted a brighter shade of oxide red than what many other railroads used and
that continued at least into the 1950's.

Contrast the color of the SP box car with the UP box car in this photo. The UP car is a bit dusty but
it's still clearly a brighter color than the SP's car.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/11/2022 12:49 AM, Robert kirkham wrote:
I’ve been a bit sick so whiling away down time, and wandered back into the Library of Congress Delano photos again. This time, I was a bit intrigued by a note on the Utah Rails sight that a photo showing Union Pacific freight car paint prior to 1944 might look like.  The answer (I think) is documented in a photo discussed on this list many times previously:https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878164/ which shows UP 471087 at the Illinois Central South Water St yard in Chicago, apparently taken April 1943.   With the large Tiff file, one can zoom in and see cars very well.  So for 1943 UP freight car colour, here’s some evidence:

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts <UP 181185 B-50-17 rebuilt steel sheathed box car.jpg>


Re: Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

Mansell Peter Hambly
 

Thanks for being such an inspiration.

 

Mansell Peter Hambly

COQUITLAM, B.C.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Charlie Duckworth
Sent: May 10, 2022 6:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

 

Growing up in Kansas City I remember my folks hitting the local railroad salvage store to see what had survived the latest derailment.  Here’s my own railroad salvage; a Red Caboose Mather reefer that’s taken 10-12 years of ops sessions abuse.  It was missing the vertical brake staff, several of the steps were missing (one survived) but it was the only Mather reefer on the layout and the leasee name was accurate.  Looking at Ted’s refrigerator car book I added Andrews trucks and airbrushed the carbody with a thinned down coat of Dullcote with a few drops of black and brown added.  After the Dullcote dried I scraped off a few boards to show those being replaced and darkened a couple others for grain variations.  Ted’s book showed a Mather car with some of the paint peaking off the side of the panels so I tried to replicate that with a light gray. 



--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

 


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Rob

I think all I can say about that UP box car is that it is extremely filthy!

UP box cars were painted a brighter shade of oxide red than what many other railroads used and
that continued at least into the 1950's.

Contrast the color of the SP box car with the UP box car in this photo. The UP car is a bit dusty but
it's still clearly a brighter color than the SP's car.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/11/2022 12:49 AM, Robert kirkham wrote:

I’ve been a bit sick so whiling away down time, and wandered back into the Library of Congress Delano photos again. This time, I was a bit intrigued by a note on the Utah Rails sight that a photo showing Union Pacific freight car paint prior to 1944 might look like.  The answer (I think) is documented in a photo discussed on this list many times previously:https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878164/ which shows UP 471087 at the Illinois Central South Water St yard in Chicago, apparently taken April 1943.   With the large Tiff file, one can zoom in and see cars very well.  So for 1943 UP freight car colour, here’s some evidence:

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Application of K4 decals

O Fenton Wells
 

Chuck I experienced the same thing this week with the K$ decals and had to pick a corner and pull them off.  Once I did that they were fine.  But they did not float off as normal.Not sure what the issue is
Fenton

On Wed, May 11, 2022 at 12:06 PM Chuck Cover <chuck.cover@...> wrote:
Group,

I have some K4 decals and am having trouble in that the decals are very difficult to remove from the backing.  The instructions say to float in warm water for 20 seconds and remove before the decals release, however, I have found that even leaving them in the distilled water for over a minute does not loosen them. I have tried to used Microset to help this process without success.  The decals will not slide off the backing.  I have had to pry up a corner, and peal the decal off the paper, then try to place the decal on the model without having the film wrinkle. Has anyone used K4 decals and are there any tips?  Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Application of K4 decals

Chuck Cover
 

Group,

I have some K4 decals and am having trouble in that the decals are very difficult to remove from the backing.  The instructions say to float in warm water for 20 seconds and remove before the decals release, however, I have found that even leaving them in the distilled water for over a minute does not loosen them. I have tried to used Microset to help this process without success.  The decals will not slide off the backing.  I have had to pry up a corner, and peal the decal off the paper, then try to place the decal on the model without having the film wrinkle. Has anyone used K4 decals and are there any tips?  Thanks

Chuck Cover
Santa Fe, NM


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Robert kirkham
 

In the end, all the factors we've discussed here (that effect reproduction of colour) leave me not too focused on the exact colour in the image, and more on the approximate relationships.   That said, I keep trying various image adjustments as you can see things that hint toward a more “natural” colour.   But its pretty subjective.   For me this image has too much yellow in the foreground grime and rails; not enough dark brown/reds.  But I find the images very hard to manipulate compared to more modern colour process images.  I have been looking for images that include PRR cars, since if you tweak the image to look more like FCC, you might be doing something right . . .  maybe.  LOL.  

But to me this image of the UP and GN cars are much more interesting for the weathering.   The grime accumulated on the GN car in 6 years - and this is only into year 2 after Pearl Harbor - is incredible.

Rob


On May 11, 2022, at 6:57 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

I love the Jack Delano color images at the Library of Congress site. They have inspired my weathering efforts on many freight cars.

But, when we look deeper into these images I think we need to make adjustments. The original photo exposure takes into account the sky and background. IMHO, this makes the freight cars underexposed.This is especially true of the broader yard scenes in the Delano images.

I just edited the original TIF file to focus on the freight cars nearest the UP box car. After cropping, I adjusted the exposure and levels to produce the attached image.

The more exposed version brings out the color for additional comparison. Note the Michigan Central box car at the far right seems to be a closer match with the UP car color. There weren't any color adjustments to the original file, only exposure and levels were adjusted.

Is it proper to fool around with these images? I think we need to do this when we are reviewing and discussing a small portion of the larger image. YMMV.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 05/10/2022 10:49 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:


I’ve been a bit sick so whiling away down time, and wandered back into the Library of Congress Delano photos again. This time, I was a bit intrigued by a note on the Utah Rails sight that a photo showing Union Pacific freight car paint prior to 1944 might look like.  The answer (I think) is documented in a photo discussed on this list many times previously:https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878164/ which shows UP 471087 at the Illinois Central South Water St yard in Chicago, apparently taken April 1943.   With the large Tiff file, one can zoom in and see cars very well.  So for 1943 UP freight car colour, here’s some evidence:


What i think is useful here is the comparison with the GNR red, the IC brown, the very dark Rock Island brown, and the NYC/Michigan Central oxide brown colour.  Very cool.  I imagine there is a pan pastel shade for that yellow colour weathering on the far side panels?   

But I was also really taken by the GN car built 6 years earlier.  The painted roof seem caps, bare galvenized roof contrasting with rust blooming through the paint on the top end panel, dust collected on each rib on the car ends, the black paint on the ends faded to a grimy gray-brown, the wood sheathing worn and streaked and the reporting marks and See America logo faded and worn.    I wonder how many Resin Car Works models of this car show this much weathering . . . 


Mine is on the to do pile, and i think this will be my inspiration.

Rob


<UP_xm_fromDelano_1a34781u.jpg>


Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

HI Eric and List Members,


I think Eric brings a legitimate point to the discussion. But I feel that in the greater overview of color and how we perceive it, in the end it will be a matter of personal taste and preference rather than a matter of objective certainty or measurable correctness.


All this being said, the yellow-ochre-tan stain on the side of the UP boxcar is still there and fully visible - I love it!


Claus Schlund


On 11-May-22 09:57, Eric Hansmann wrote:

I love the Jack Delano color images at the Library of Congress site. They have inspired my weathering efforts on many freight cars.

But, when we look deeper into these images I think we need to make adjustments. The original photo exposure takes into account the sky and background. IMHO, this makes the freight cars underexposed.This is especially true of the broader yard scenes in the Delano images.

I just edited the original TIF file to focus on the freight cars nearest the UP box car. After cropping, I adjusted the exposure and levels to produce the attached image.

The more exposed version brings out the color for additional comparison. Note the Michigan Central box car at the far right seems to be a closer match with the UP car color. There weren't any color adjustments to the original file, only exposure and levels were adjusted.

Is it proper to fool around with these images? I think we need to do this when we are reviewing and discussing a small portion of the larger image. YMMV.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 05/10/2022 10:49 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:


I’ve been a bit sick so whiling away down time, and wandered back into the Library of Congress Delano photos again. This time, I was a bit intrigued by a note on the Utah Rails sight that a photo showing Union Pacific freight car paint prior to 1944 might look like.  The answer (I think) is documented in a photo discussed on this list many times previously:https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878164/ which shows UP 471087 at the Illinois Central South Water St yard in Chicago, apparently taken April 1943.   With the large Tiff file, one can zoom in and see cars very well.  So for 1943 UP freight car colour, here’s some evidence:


What i think is useful here is the comparison with the GNR red, the IC brown, the very dark Rock Island brown, and the NYC/Michigan Central oxide brown colour.  Very cool.  I imagine there is a pan pastel shade for that yellow colour weathering on the far side panels?   

But I was also really taken by the GN car built 6 years earlier.  The painted roof seem caps, bare galvenized roof contrasting with rust blooming through the paint on the top end panel, dust collected on each rib on the car ends, the black paint on the ends faded to a grimy gray-brown, the wood sheathing worn and streaked and the reporting marks and See America logo faded and worn.    I wonder how many Resin Car Works models of this car show this much weathering . . . 


Mine is on the to do pile, and i think this will be my inspiration.

Rob



Re: UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Eric Hansmann
 

I love the Jack Delano color images at the Library of Congress site. They have inspired my weathering efforts on many freight cars.

But, when we look deeper into these images I think we need to make adjustments. The original photo exposure takes into account the sky and background. IMHO, this makes the freight cars underexposed.This is especially true of the broader yard scenes in the Delano images.

I just edited the original TIF file to focus on the freight cars nearest the UP box car. After cropping, I adjusted the exposure and levels to produce the attached image.

The more exposed version brings out the color for additional comparison. Note the Michigan Central box car at the far right seems to be a closer match with the UP car color. There weren't any color adjustments to the original file, only exposure and levels were adjusted.

Is it proper to fool around with these images? I think we need to do this when we are reviewing and discussing a small portion of the larger image. YMMV.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 05/10/2022 10:49 PM Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:


I’ve been a bit sick so whiling away down time, and wandered back into the Library of Congress Delano photos again. This time, I was a bit intrigued by a note on the Utah Rails sight that a photo showing Union Pacific freight car paint prior to 1944 might look like.  The answer (I think) is documented in a photo discussed on this list many times previously:https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878164/ which shows UP 471087 at the Illinois Central South Water St yard in Chicago, apparently taken April 1943.   With the large Tiff file, one can zoom in and see cars very well.  So for 1943 UP freight car colour, here’s some evidence:


What i think is useful here is the comparison with the GNR red, the IC brown, the very dark Rock Island brown, and the NYC/Michigan Central oxide brown colour.  Very cool.  I imagine there is a pan pastel shade for that yellow colour weathering on the far side panels?   

But I was also really taken by the GN car built 6 years earlier.  The painted roof seem caps, bare galvenized roof contrasting with rust blooming through the paint on the top end panel, dust collected on each rib on the car ends, the black paint on the ends faded to a grimy gray-brown, the wood sheathing worn and streaked and the reporting marks and See America logo faded and worn.    I wonder how many Resin Car Works models of this car show this much weathering . . . 


Mine is on the to do pile, and i think this will be my inspiration.

Rob



Re: Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

Paul Doggett
 


Charlie 

More great work they look really good.

Paul Doggett.     England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 

On 11 May 2022, at 02:09, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:



Growing up in Kansas City I remember my folks hitting the local railroad salvage store to see what had survived the latest derailment.  Here’s my own railroad salvage; a Red Caboose Mather reefer that’s taken 10-12 years of ops sessions abuse.  It was missing the vertical brake staff, several of the steps were missing (one survived) but it was the only Mather reefer on the layout and the leasee name was accurate.  Looking at Ted’s refrigerator car book I added Andrews trucks and airbrushed the carbody with a thinned down coat of Dullcote with a few drops of black and brown added.  After the Dullcote dried I scraped off a few boards to show those being replaced and darkened a couple others for grain variations.  Ted’s book showed a Mather car with some of the paint peaking off the side of the panels so I tried to replicate that with a light gray. 


77749B5F-03A7-4C76-A4EF-DD781AEC0E0B.jpeg3DA0DAD9-22EB-469D-865F-E7EF063D38F2.jpegA5D8B79E-88CB-491F-84A7-28537287E3AE.jpegC0ED08A0-4F02-41F9-AEA8-73AD21ADFAD4.jpeg
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

Robert kirkham
 

that’s working equipment!

Looks like a fun project.

Rob

On May 10, 2022, at 6:09 PM, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:

Growing up in Kansas City I remember my folks hitting the local railroad salvage store to see what had survived the latest derailment.  Here’s my own railroad salvage; a Red Caboose Mather reefer that’s taken 10-12 years of ops sessions abuse.  It was missing the vertical brake staff, several of the steps were missing (one survived) but it was the only Mather reefer on the layout and the leasee name was accurate.  Looking at Ted’s refrigerator car book I added Andrews trucks and airbrushed the carbody with a thinned down coat of Dullcote with a few drops of black and brown added.  After the Dullcote dried I scraped off a few boards to show those being replaced and darkened a couple others for grain variations.  Ted’s book showed a Mather car with some of the paint peaking off the side of the panels so I tried to replicate that with a light gray. 


<77749B5F-03A7-4C76-A4EF-DD781AEC0E0B.jpeg><3DA0DAD9-22EB-469D-865F-E7EF063D38F2.jpeg><A5D8B79E-88CB-491F-84A7-28537287E3AE.jpeg><C0ED08A0-4F02-41F9-AEA8-73AD21ADFAD4.jpeg>
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



UP Pre 1944 Boxcar red & GN 1937 cars

Robert kirkham
 

I’ve been a bit sick so whiling away down time, and wandered back into the Library of Congress Delano photos again. This time, I was a bit intrigued by a note on the Utah Rails sight that a photo showing Union Pacific freight car paint prior to 1944 might look like.  The answer (I think) is documented in a photo discussed on this list many times previously:https://www.loc.gov/item/2017878164/ which shows UP 471087 at the Illinois Central South Water St yard in Chicago, apparently taken April 1943.   With the large Tiff file, one can zoom in and see cars very well.  So for 1943 UP freight car colour, here’s some evidence:

What i think is useful here is the comparison with the GNR red, the IC brown, the very dark Rock Island brown, and the NYC/Michigan Central oxide brown colour.  Very cool.  I imagine there is a pan pastel shade for that yellow colour weathering on the far side panels?   

But I was also really taken by the GN car built 6 years earlier.  The painted roof seem caps, bare galvenized roof contrasting with rust blooming through the paint on the top end panel, dust collected on each rib on the car ends, the black paint on the ends faded to a grimy gray-brown, the wood sheathing worn and streaked and the reporting marks and See America logo faded and worn.    I wonder how many Resin Car Works models of this car show this much weathering . . . 

Mine is on the to do pile, and i think this will be my inspiration.

Rob


Re: Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

 

Beauty, Charlie. You are turning into a PROPST machine, the way you are knocking them out.

Rich Christie

On Tuesday, May 10, 2022, 08:09:43 PM CDT, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:


Growing up in Kansas City I remember my folks hitting the local railroad salvage store to see what had survived the latest derailment.  Here’s my own railroad salvage; a Red Caboose Mather reefer that’s taken 10-12 years of ops sessions abuse.  It was missing the vertical brake staff, several of the steps were missing (one survived) but it was the only Mather reefer on the layout and the leasee name was accurate.  Looking at Ted’s refrigerator car book I added Andrews trucks and airbrushed the carbody with a thinned down coat of Dullcote with a few drops of black and brown added.  After the Dullcote dried I scraped off a few boards to show those being replaced and darkened a couple others for grain variations.  Ted’s book showed a Mather car with some of the paint peaking off the side of the panels so I tried to replicate that with a light gray. 



--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

Nelson Moyer
 

Charlie, you consistently set the bar over the top when it comes to board weathering. The roof is also a really nice touch.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2022 8:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Railroad salvage: Mather Hygrade reefer

 

Growing up in Kansas City I remember my folks hitting the local railroad salvage store to see what had survived the latest derailment.  Here’s my own railroad salvage; a Red Caboose Mather reefer that’s taken 10-12 years of ops sessions abuse.  It was missing the vertical brake staff, several of the steps were missing (one survived) but it was the only Mather reefer on the layout and the leasee name was accurate.  Looking at Ted’s refrigerator car book I added Andrews trucks and airbrushed the carbody with a thinned down coat of Dullcote with a few drops of black and brown added.  After the Dullcote dried I scraped off a few boards to show those being replaced and darkened a couple others for grain variations.  Ted’s book showed a Mather car with some of the paint peaking off the side of the panels so I tried to replicate that with a light gray. 



--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

4541 - 4560 of 197030