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Freight Car Modeling: Rath Meat Reefer

Bob Chaparro
 

Freight Car Modeling: Rath Meat Reefer

An illustrated post from John Golden's Railroad Prototype Modeler blog:

https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/2022/03/13/no-171-freight-car-modeling-rath-meat-reefers-and-rock-island-single-sheathed-box-car/

John describes how he modeled a Rath reefer from a Red Caboose kit.

Article includes prototype photos.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


WFEX long angled queen posts update

Charlie Duckworth
 

Update…I’d ordered a set of long HO queen posts off Shapeways and they arrived a few days ago.  I removed them from their base and sanded the bottoms at a slight angle for gluing on the channels.  The tops where the truss rods were to sit weren’t open as with Tichy’s or Grandt Line’s so I took a micro-saw and cut in a small groove.  Then took a slightly wider saw and opened up the groove a little more - only snapped one post and luckily found the top half on my shirt. 😵‍💫. Not sure what I’d done if it hit the carpet.   After the posts dried I added some Evergreen 1”x 3” and 1”x2” shapes to somewhat replicate the part of the posts that bolted on the side of the channels. Thinking these details will appear once I add some weathering to the underframe. I’ve installed the AB brakes and the underframe is finished.   I’ll remove the black paint where the two rods meet in the turn buckle. 


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: IHB boxcar finished

Tim O'Connor
 


The C&A was a B&O subsidiary and later was absorbed into the GM&O but in 1950 there were still
a small number of 40 foot War Emergency (51000 series) and all steel 40 foot (52000 series) box cars
that still had their C&A lettering...  :-)


On 5/18/2022 5:21 PM, Charlie Duckworth wrote:
Having started with the Mopac and having to see interchange made between the MP/TP/C&EI/M-I, I’m drawn (for some odd reasoning), to the various subsidiaries the Class Ones had. So the layout has a small population of FW&D, T&NO, I-GN, StLB&M, B&A, P&LE, NJI&I and now an IHB car.  
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Peter Hall
 

Well, just in time!

Thanks for the new arrival announcement.

Thanks
Pete

On May 19, 2022, at 10:19 AM, Bruce Griffin <bdg1210@...> wrote:

It appears that there will be a release of an HO scale sugar beet load this month...

https://micro-trains.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=4400&search=ho+load+2022&description=true
 

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
https://bomodeling.com/blog/

 


Re: Wanted: Chooch sugar beet loads - HO scale

Bruce Griffin
 

It appears that there will be a release of an HO scale sugar beet load this month...

https://micro-trains.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=4400&search=ho+load+2022&description=true

 

Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
https://bomodeling.com/blog/

 


Re: Carmer uncoupling hardware

Guy Wilber
 

 Eric Hansmann wrote:

"It seems the newer rotating handle uncoupling designs came into use almost at the same time as AB brake systems on new freight cars."

Yes, "AB" brakes were required on all new cars built on and after September 1, 1933.  

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada 






_._,_._,_


Re: Photo: Second Brooke Avenue Yard (Circa 1950s)

Scott
 

The article on the Southgate Terminal was in Model Railroad Planning 2002.  It has a cover shot of an U.P Turbine on it.

Scott McDonald 


Re: Photo: Second Brooke Avenue Yard (Circa 1950s)

Marty McGuirk
 

Bernie Kempinski write the article you’re thinking of - it was in MRP not MR.
He also wrote a follow up of sorts on his blog:

On May 18, 2022, at 4:27 PM, David Wiggs <bigwiggs@...> wrote:


Several or many years ago, MR (?) featured an article about this little yard with an accompanying track plan.  This photo was in the article.  Can't remember the year or issue; only the molasses tank.

Davo in Orlando


Re: Photo: Second Brooke Avenue Yard (Circa 1950s)

David Wiggs
 

Several or many years ago, MR (?) featured an article about this little yard with an accompanying track plan.  This photo was in the article.  Can't remember the year or issue; only the molasses tank.

Davo in Orlando


Re: IHB boxcar finished

Charlie Duckworth
 

Having started with the Mopac and having to see interchange made between the MP/TP/C&EI/M-I, I’m drawn (for some odd reasoning), to the various subsidiaries the Class Ones had. So the layout has a small population of FW&D, T&NO, I-GN, StLB&M, B&A, P&LE, NJI&I and now an IHB car.  
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Carmer uncoupling hardware

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Wed, May 18, 2022 at 06:23 AM, Jim Betz wrote:
Since bottom activated cut levers 'replaced' the top activated ... what
was the advantage of them over top activated?  Was the pin more
likely to drop correctly with bottom operated or something like that?
As Bruce said, both the Type D and later Type E could be had either way, but bottom operated came to be preferred. Top operated had an opening that allowed water, ice, and debris into the lock mechanism, which could then jam. In addition, the clever pin lifter linkage of the bottom operated style provided a mechanical advantage that made them smoother and easier to operate. We had both types at the railway museum where I was active years ago, so I've worked with both types.

Dennis Storzek


Re: IHB boxcar finished

Robert kirkham
 

great looking model - really like the seldom seen IHB logo.

Rob

On May 18, 2022, at 4:20 AM, Paul Doggett via groups.io <paul.doggett2472@...> wrote:

Charlie 

A really neat job yet again.

Paul Doggett 


On 18 May 2022, at 12:14, Charlie Duckworth <omahaduck@...> wrote:

Another NYC subject (this makes three) recent builds; the National Scale Car decals are so well researched I used them on the Tichy kit, the Westerfield modernized 1916 boxcar and Intermountain’s 10’6” 40’ boxcar. TruColor Rock Island FCB mixed with a couple drops of ART yellow for the carbody. Light weathering with colored pencils and a few chalk marks with white pencil.  I upgraded the kits parts with wire handgrabs, flexible rubber air hoses and Tangent cut levers. 
-- <0ADAC288-E811-4C77-A60E-7E37EF96F7CB.jpeg><DDA82D23-F5C7-4A45-BB04-2278527D3CB2.jpeg>
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: IHB boxcar finished

Charlie Duckworth
 

The decals showed a light weight ‘new’ year of 1944.  

On Wed, May 18, 2022 at 9:38 AM radiodial868 <radiodial57@...> wrote:
Those Tichy kits are very underrated. Sure wish the Tooling & Die guy had got around to making some additional prototypes.   
Your build is beautiful. On the IHB decals, any information on when that scheme was first used?
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: IHB boxcar finished

radiodial868
 

Those Tichy kits are very underrated. Sure wish the Tooling & Die guy had got around to making some additional prototypes.   
Your build is beautiful. On the IHB decals, any information on when that scheme was first used?
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Re: Carmer uncoupling hardware

Bruce Smith
 

Jim,

 

While couplers changed over time (for example type D to type E around WWII), iirc, both could be either top or bottom operated. Carmer devices were not the only top operated device as many early rod type uncoupling levers were also top operating. That was not the issue.

 

The issue was that, to operate a Carmer lever, the operator had to press DOWN on the lever. To operate either top or bottom operating rod levers, the operator had to lift UP. Pressing down was a safety hazard because a slip placed you on the ground, near the wheels whereas it was easier to brace and not slip when lifting.

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Jim Betz <jimbetz@...>
Reply-To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 at 8:23 AM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Carmer uncoupling hardware

 

CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

Guy/anyone who knows,

  Did the coupler itself change?  I'm asking if the Carmer cut levers would
not work on 'later' couplers.  And were those couplers 'mandated' or the
top activated 'outlawed' thus ending the usefulness of the Carmers?
  Sind bottom activated cut levers 'replaced' the top activated ... what
was the advantage of them over top activated?  Was the pin more
likely to drop correctly with bottom operated or something like that?
                                                                          - Jim in the PNW


Re: F&C AC&F Mathieson Dry Ice Car

Tim O'Connor
 


Any ideas who built this one?


On 5/18/2022 12:57 AM, Ed Hawkins wrote:

On May 17, 2022, at 9:51 PM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Thanks!  Interestingly, the decal sheet with the early version of the F&C kit has decals for MAWX 5035. There are three sets of data, but no additional numbers to allow for numbering in the series posted below. That is, with one extra 5035, there are not enough duplicate numbers to number the car sides anything but 5035 without looking for additional decals. It does have car end decals for MAWX 5030, 5033, and 5035. The car # pictured in in the instructions is 5032, but there are no decals for that car number in the kit.

Bruce,
The 25 MAWX 5034-5058 dry ice cars built 10-47 by Despatch Shops, Inc., were similar to conventional steel refrigerator cars from an overall outward appearance to include roof hatches at each corner. The side swing doors with 8 hinges (4 per door) were significantly different than the various hinges used by PFE, URTX, ART, and many others. The rotating part of the hinges attached to the doors were long, narrow steel plate that extended horizontally from the door edge to nearly the center. Bob’s Photo has a photo of MAWX 5049 taken in July 1952 & Arnold Menke’s collection has MAWX 5040 taken ca. 1954.

I’ll also use this message to note a  fat-finger typo on my previous reply in which the 6-car series for ACF lot 2427 should be MAWX 5028-5033, built 4-42.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo: Second Brooke Avenue Yard (Circa 1950s)

Bruce Smith
 

Jim,

 

Let me suggest that you have it backwards. The cars are OUTSIDE the fence, not enclosed by it. The fence is designed to control access to the rail yard and warehouse area. And of course, access is from the continuation at the bottom of the screen, likely off an road that runs by the facility.

 

Regards,

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Jim Betz <jimbetz@...>
Reply-To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 at 8:50 AM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Second Brooke Avenue Yard (Circa 1950s)

 

CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

Hi,
  Additional/followup question ... speaking of those autos.  First, I'm kind of surprised
that they are behind a fence ... I'm guessing theft risks.  And, more importantly, how
did those cars and the trucks get to this area?  I'm guessing that the only route in is
via some access along the water between the ends of the buildings and the sea wall.
                                                                        - Jim in the PNW


Re: Photo: Second Brooke Avenue Yard (Circa 1950s)

Jim Betz
 

Hi,
  Additional/followup question ... speaking of those autos.  First, I'm kind of surprised
that they are behind a fence ... I'm guessing theft risks.  And, more importantly, how
did those cars and the trucks get to this area?  I'm guessing that the only route in is
via some access along the water between the ends of the buildings and the sea wall.
                                                                        - Jim in the PNW


Re: Photo: Second Brooke Avenue Yard (Circa 1950s)

Jim Betz
 

Bob,
  Thanks for this photo and all of the others you post - they are valued.
  In this pic the detail that I love is that rubber-tired truck backed in between two
box cars!
  I also love seeing all of those 50's era automobiles parked "in between the
tracks".  This is something we can use on our layouts!  Of course that means
also including the roads/routes and crossings for them to get there.  All easy
enough to do and as is often said "the devil is in the details".
                                                                                  - Jim in the PNW


Re: Carmer uncoupling hardware

Jim Betz
 

  "Sind" should have been "Since".

2961 - 2980 of 195621