Date   

Re: Kadee C&O 50' PS-1

HAWK0621@...
 

In a message dated 5/21/03 2:02:46 AM, scottp459@... writes:

I'm surprised to find myself asking this, but where has a photo been
published
of the C&O 21000-21499 series as modeled by Kadee? I'm looking for one
in original form. I want to put about 9 years of wear on the paint job.
The photo in C&O Color Guide is in later paint and minus running board.
Otherwise the details seem to match well. I think?
Scott,
There's a photo taken July 1956 of C&O 21109 published on page 114 of Erie In
Color by Morning Sun Books. Two brand new Erie 50' box cars are shown coupled
to this car and is the primary reason the photo is in this book. The C&O car
was only three months old at the time. The photo is a distant shot taken from
a high angle of a freight yard with the C&O car in the foreground. Black ends
and an unpainted galvanized roof/running board is evident in the photo. It
appears to me that the seam caps were coated with black car cement, a
practice used by several builders during the early to mid-1950s on various
series of cars.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: This is completely ON topic!

CBarkan@...
 

I think the X-29's fore-runner, the X-25 is actually a more interesting &
attractive car, and it too is under-represented. And it can lay claim to being
the first large-production all-steel boxcar.

Chris-Barkan

In a message dated 5/20/03 8:58:49 PM, b.hom@... writes:

<< PRR Class X29: It wasn't the first steel boxcar. It had three significant
design limitations: a side sill design that trapped water, when combined
with a leaky roof design, led to significant corrosion problems in virtually
every car built. Additionally, the car had a smallish cubic capacity due to
its 8 ft 7 in IH. The Pennsy kept it in production so long that it was
obsolescent by the time the last one was built in 1932. But the Pennsy
built 28,701 of them, and they showed up in every kind of freight and
passenger (as express cars) all over North America from 1924 into the 1960s.
You simply can't model a steam era freight train without at least one. >>


Re: Favorite freight car

CBarkan@...
 

In a message dated 5/21/03 8:41:08 AM, drs@... commits blasphemy by
stating:

<< B&O wagon-tops; them's homely, but spottable miles away >>


Beauty is certainly in the eye of the beholder. I think the B&O's wagontops
are among the most esthetically attractive of all freight cars. Combined
with the elegance and uniqueness of their construction design, they are
certainly among my favorite. Of course I MIGHT be biased.

I agree that they are spottable from a great distance (perhaps even miles in
the right photograph!)

Chris Barkan


Kadee C&O 50' PS-1

Scott Pitzer
 

I'm surprised to find myself asking this, but where has a photo been published of the C&O 21000-21499 series as modeled by Kadee? I'm looking for one in original form. I want to put about 9 years of wear on the paint job. The photo in C&O Color Guide is in later paint and minus running board. Otherwise the details seem to match well. I think?
Years ago I did one from the Bev Bel/Robin's Rails kit, where I replaced much of their lettering with more accurate stuff from Champ, but I didn't make a note of what photo I was referring to!
Thanks
Scott Pitzer


Re: This is completely ON topic!

Denis F. Blake <dblake2996@...>
 

Without a doubt, from my view point, that would be the Seaboards 1932 cars.
These cars saw service for many years with some of them getting rebuilt into
ventilated express cars as well. The Seaboard was second in total owned of
these cars, behind the Mopac.

Sure would be nice to get a plastic model of this car but there were simply
too many variations and too few so called "major" owners for this to happen.

Best regards,

Denis F. Blake
NS Conductor
Columbus, OH
TTHOTS

Please visit my photo site at

http://hyperphoto.photoloft.com/view/allalbums.asp?s=cano&u=1665499

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill Lane" <billlane@...>
To: "Steam Era Freight cars" <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 20, 2003 7:50 PM
Subject: [STMFC] This is completely ON topic!


Hi All,

I figured I would shake the list up with something that is completely ON
STMFC topic. Wow, what a novel concept I!! (:->)

In 100 words or less, what is your single favorite Steam Era Freight Car,
and WHY? Principal contributors Ted Culotta and Ben Hom are required to
respond.

This outta be interesting. I stir the pot, and see what happens.....

Thanks
Bill



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Re: This is completely ON topic!

thompson@...
 

Ben Hom said:
PRR Class X29: ...the Pennsy
built 28,701 of them, and they showed up in every kind of freight and
passenger (as express cars) all over North America from 1924 into the 1960s.
You simply can't model a steam era freight train without at least one.
I'd vote with Ben. That's why the X29 was on the first Friends of the
Freight Car shirt. (and you thought I was an unrepentant teaser of SPFs...)

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Caboose brakes

thompson@...
 

Jace Kahn said:
It is not often that I can second-guess you on freight car matters, but some
of the four-wheel bobbers did, in fact, have only one brakewheel (notably
the famous Reading ones), perhaps because it was not so far from one
platform to the other as with eight-wheel cabooses.
Okay, Jace, I should have said that STATISTICALLY cabooses always had two
brake wheels. I'm sure that there are 19th century cars without them.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Athearn's 48-foot gon

thompson@...
 

Scott Chatfield writes:
Just a word about that gon. It does have a prototype, Bethlehem's late-50s
gon outfitted for coil steel service, thus the covers that were included
with some kits, and the extra rivets in the sides. Unfortunately, ol'
Uncle Irv shortened the car so it could reuse his 50-foot flat's fishbelly
underframe, which itself is a problem 'cause I think most if not all
fishbelly side gons had straight centersills, not fishbellies (and
certainly by the late '50s they did). That's why the gon is only ~48 feet
long...unfortunately, the way Irv compressed the gon's features makes it
impossible to kitbash it into a proper-length model of those Bethlehem
gons, short of cutting ALL of the ribs off the sides and relocating them on
a longer body...Irv rendered the ladders and
grabs wrong, I think because one of the few drawings was overly simplified.
And you're still sure, Scott, that this follows a prototype? I'd call it
a loose use of the word "follow."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: This is completely ON topic!

Spen Kellogg <spenkell@...>
 

Bill Lane wrote:
Hi All,
I figured I would shake the list up with something that is completely ON
STMFC topic. Wow, what a novel concept I!! (:->)
In 100 words or less, what is your single favorite Steam Era Freight Car,
and WHY? Principal contributors Ted Culotta and Ben Hom are required to
respond.
This outta be interesting. I stir the pot, and see what happens.....
SP Tea and Silk car. Second choice is the SP BR-40-10 express reefer.

Regards, Spen Kellogg


Re: This is completely ON topic!

Steven Delibert <STEVDEL@...>
 

Well, painful to answer an on-topic message, but this one is easy for
me: New York Central "USRA" boxcars, of course: Shouldn't exist, were
built by the bazillions and survived for decades, easy to spot, signature
car of my favorite big railroad, available in several variations in
Wonderful Westerfield kits, only close competition is Westerfield NYC
hoppers . . ...
Now, if somebody really made Ulster & Delaware models, we might have
something to debate, but otherwise, case closed for me! Doubtless rational
minds may differ.
Steve Delibert

----- Original Message -----
From: Bill Lane <billlane@...>
In 100 words or less, what is your single favorite Steam Era Freight Car,
and WHY? Principal contributors Ted Culotta and Ben Hom are required to
respond.


Re: Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's

Mont Switzer <ZOE@...>
 

SHAWN: WHEN I WAS HANGING AROUND THE LOCAL ELEVATOR IN THE 1950'S AND
1960'S (BECAUSE IT WAS NEXT TO THE RAILROAD) THEY RECEIVED CORN, WHEAT, OATS
AND A NEW CROP, SOY BEANS. THE CORN WAS SHELLED AND ELEVATED TO BINS IN THE
ELEVATOR BUILDING. THE CORN COBS WERE ELEVATED ALSO AND THEN ALLOWED TO
DROP IN THE COB BURNER BY GRAVITY. THE WHEAT, OATS AND SOY BEANS WERE ALSO
ELEVATED AND STORED. BOXCARS WERE LOADED IN BULK BY GRAVITY FROM THE BINS
HIGH ABOVE IN THE ELEVATOR. SIX FOOT DOOR CARS ONLY, STEEL CARS PREFERRED.
THIS GRAIN WAS PURCHASED BY THE ELEVATOR FROM THE FARMERS AND WHEN RESOLD
WAS SHIPPED IN BULK BY RAIL. A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF GRAIN WAS RETAINED FOR
LOCAL FEED MILLING NEEDS.

THE ELEVATORS AROUND HERE WERE ALSO FEED MILLS. FARMERS WOULD BRING IN
THEIR GRAINS, DUMP THEM AND GET THEM BACK GROUND AND MIXED AS FEED IN BURLAP
BAGS. THE FEED BAGS WERE USUALLY HAULED BACK TO THE FARM IN THE SAME TRUCK
THAT BROUGHT THE GRAINS IN ALTHOUGH SOME FARMERS PURCHASED GRAIN THAT WAS IN
STORAGE IN THE ELEVATOR.

THERE COULD HAVE BEEN LOADS OF BAGGED FEED SHIPPED AND RECEIVED IN BOXCARS
DURING THIS PERIOD, BUT I DO NOT RECALL ANY. THIS WAS LEFT TO THE LARGER
MILLS THAT SHIPPED AND RECEIVED IN BULK.

THE LOCAL ELEVATOR ALSO RECEIVED VARIOUS GRADES OF COAL IN HOPPER CARS,
LIQUID FERTILIZER IN TANK CARS, BAGGED FERTILIZER, SALT, FENCING, FEEDERS,
WATER TANKS AND GATES IN BOXCARS. ALL OF THIS WAS SOLD AND DISTRIBUTED BY
THE ELEVATOR COMPANY. OCCASIONALLY WE WOULD SEE A FLAT CAR OF ELECTRICAL
POLES FOR THE LOCAL REMC OR TELEPHONE POLES THE LOCAL BELL TELEPHONE
AFFILIATE. YOU CAN GET A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF A SINGLE ELEVATOR SIDING.

IN RURAL AMERICA THE LOCAL ELEVATOR WAS THE HUB OF ACTIVITY DURING THE
HARVEST. BECAUSE OF THE ELEVATOR THE LOCAL BANK, DRUG STORE, RESTAURANT,
SERVICE STATION, HARDWARE AND A COUPLE OF OTHER SMALL BUSINESSES WERE IN
EXISTENCE. MONT SWITZER

----- Original Message -----
From: Beckert, Shawn <shawn.beckert@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 20, 2003 7:21 PM
Subject: [STMFC] RE: Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's


UPRR had covered hoppers in the 1940's
But UP #1-500 were 1958 cubic feet, 70 tons nominal capacity
cars which suggest they were intended to carry much denser
commodities than grain.
Grain hoppers generally were rated at around 3000 cubic foot
capacity for 70 tons nominal capacities. The UP had none of
these listed in the April 1949 ORER. I am aware of no such
animal existing on other roads in 1949, but my survey is rather
brief.
It's my understanding that the 70-ton cars were used primarily for
cement or sand loading. The GATX Airslide cars came along in the
late 1950's, as I recall, and I'm not sure that they were used for
grain so much as processed flour and the like. The "grain hopper"
didn't come into its own until the PS-2's of the 1960's, AFAIK.

The point of my original question was to gain an understanding of
how boxcars in grain service were loaded in the 1950's. We know
grain was bagged and loaded into cars, we know that cars with grain
doors were loaded by chute. But did wooden grain elevators load both
ways? And did concrete elevators load by chute only, or did some have
the capability to fill "by the bag" and load a boxcar the old fashioned
way? It's not an idle question; such information would be helpful in
modeling an elevator located in the southwest of the 1950's. I haven't
been able to locate any photos of grain elevators in the region/period
I'm modeling to help in resolving this issue.

Shawn Beckert




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Re: Brass costs

Schuyler G Larrabee <SGL2@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: <thompson@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Brass costs


Tony Thompson moaned:

You mean I was supposed to get paid for all that research I did for
those
guys? Where were you when I needed you, Schuyler?
Yeah, well, I've done my share too, but I can tell you that when Alco Models
[to use a defunct example] did a model the research was ALL on the
contributor, or at least 95% was. Now, I know that some importers do their
own research. The contribution made by non-employees of the importer in the
cases of two cases I have personally been involved with was essentially
advising the importer where to find an example of the real thing, which they
went and researched themselves.

OTOH, I have done, for the same importer, extensive research into a
prototype which will be produced as a model, of which there is a snowball's
chance it would ever have been done otherwise. I will be compensated, at a
rate approaching $0.05/hr. If that.

SGL


Re: Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's

Mont Switzer <ZOE@...>
 

SHAWN: ADDING TO WHAT ANDY HAS SAID MOST MIDWESTERN TOWNS STARTED OUT WITH
A WOODEN ELEVATOR STRUCTURE THAT WAS USED TO GRIND FEED AS WELL AS STORE
GRAIN FOR SHIPMENT. AS GRAIN PRODUCTION INCREASED AND FARMERS WENT TO CASH
CROPS STORAGE SILO'S WERE BUILT USING THE FAVORED TECHNOLOGY OF THE TIME.

NEARBY SULPHUR SPRINGS, IN IS A GREAT EXAMPLE. THE OLD FEED MILL IS A
WOODEN STRUCTURE BUILT BEFORE 1920. STORAGE CAPACITY WAS FIRST INCREASED
WITH SILO'S BUILT OF CONCRETE BLOCKS WITH STEEL STAYS AROUND THEM. I'M
GUESSING THIS WAS DONE IN THE LATE 1920'S OR 1930'S. NEXT CAME SILO'S
ASSEMBLED OF FLANGED STEEL BOLTED TOGETHER. THEY WERE PROBABLY BUILT BEFORE
WWII. IN THE 1950'S A NEW REINFORCED CONCRETE DUMPER AND SILOS WERE ADDED
AND THEY DOMINATE THE ELEVATOR TO THIS DAY. THE 1960'S SAW THE ADDITION OF
HUGE CORRUGATED STEEL "GRAIN BINS" ADDED. I HAVE A POSTER SIZE SHOT OF THIS
ELEVATOR THAT I SOMETIMES USE AS A BACKDROP FOR SCALE MODEL PHOTOGRAPHY.

A LITTLE OFF TOPIC IS WHAT IS GOING ON OVER AT EMPORIA, IN. WHEN THERE IS A
BUMPER CORN CROP THEY RUN OUT OF BINS AND SILO'S. WHEN THIS HAPPENS THEY
HAUL THE GRAIN FROM THE DUMPER AROUND THE CLOCK IN DUMP TRUCKS INTO A 6 FOOT
HIGH "PEN" MADE OF REINFORCED CONCRETE SECTIONS WITH A CRUSHED STONE FLOOR.
THEY JUST BACK IN THE "PEN" AND DUMP THE SHELLED CORN. THEY USE AUGERS TO
PILE IT HIGH AND A BUCKET LOADER HELPS, ALSO . NEXT COMES A PLASTIC COVER
WHICH IS INFLATED BY BLOWERS AND PROTECTS THE PILE FROM MOISTURE. THIS IS
LOT CHEAPER TO CONSTRUCT THAN THE SILO'S AND BINS OF THE PAST. THE PEN SETS
EMPTY MOST OF THE YEAR AND IS JUST A HALF A STEP BETTER THAN PILING IT ON
THE GROUND IN MY HUMBLE OPINION.

CLOSER TO TOPIC, THEY SWITCH EMPORIA WITH AN ALCO S-2. ON TOPIC, THE PLACE
WAS A LOT SMALLER IN THE 1950'S AND THE LOADED STRINGS BOXCARS. MONT
SWITZER

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 20, 2003 3:16 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's


Shawn Beckert asked:

"When did concrete grain elevators begin to replace the old wooden
elevators?"

Concrete grain elevators were being built at large terminals at least as
far
back as the first decade of the 20th century. I don't know when they would
have begun appearing at smaller stations, but the technology to build them
is very old. (The Romans used reinforced concrete.)

"Did the two co-exist for any length of time?"

Clearly yes - there are still wooden elevators out there.

"I'm thinking concrete elevators would have shown up about when covered
hoppers began being used to haul grain, but that's just speculation on my
part."

No, long before that. It was only in the 1960s that covered hoppers began
being used for grain in a big way.

"In the 1950's would one tend to see more wooden elevators in the
southwest
than the concrete variety?"

I can't answer that definitively, but concrete elevators aren't unusual in
1950s photos taken along the Santa Fe.

So long,

Andy





Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
MODEL RAILROADER Magazine
262-796-8776, ext. 461
Fax 262-796-1142
asperandeo@...

----------
From: Beckert, Shawn
Reply To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, May 20, 2003 12:50 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's

List,

A slightly off-topic question (but only slightly)
aimed at the "granger" modelers on the list:

When did concrete grain elevators begin to replace
the old wooden elevators? Did the two co-exist for
any length of time? I'm thinking concrete elevators
would have shown up about when covered hoppers began
being used to haul grain, but that's just speculation
on my part.In the 1950's would one tend to see more
wooden elevators in the southwest than the concrete
variety? Thanks for the input.

Shawn Beckert


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Re: Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's

Howard R. Garner <hrgarner@...>
 

Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 10:50:14 -0700
From: "Beckert, Shawn" <shawn.beckert@...>
Subject: Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's
List,
A slightly off-topic question (but only slightly)
aimed at the "granger" modelers on the list:
When did concrete grain elevators begin to replace
the old wooden elevators? Did the two co-exist for
any length of time? I'm thinking concrete elevators
would have shown up about when covered hoppers began
being used to haul grain, but that's just speculation
on my part.In the 1950's would one tend to see more wooden elevators in the southwest than the concrete variety? Thanks for the input.
Shawn Beckert
This first concrete grain elevator was built about 1900. By the mid 1910's the construction was being covered in text books.

Howard
hanging out in 1905


D&SL Gons

Howard R. Garner <hrgarner@...>
 

Date: Tue, 20 May 2003 09:13:05 -0400 (EDT)
From: newrail@...
Subject: Re: Re: Diminishing hobby?
Quoting Kevin Slark <MoffatRoad@...>:

(To keep a bit of true STMFC content....Does anyone
know of any D&SL GS gons in HO, brass or otherwise?)

Didn't someone offer these as resin kits within the last five or six years?
Good kits. The stack up well against a Westerfield or Sunshine. Offered in both inside stake and outside stake version.
They also offered the DN-WP original lettering.

Only one got ya. If you warm the casting to remove warping, the casting stays soft.


Re: This is completely ON topic!

Benjamin Frank Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Bill Lane wrote:
In 100 words or less, what is your single favorite Steam Era Freight Car,
and WHY? Principal contributors Ted Culotta and Ben Hom are required to
respond.

PRR Class X29: It wasn't the first steel boxcar. It had three significant
design limitations: a side sill design that trapped water, when combined
with a leaky roof design, led to significant corrosion problems in virtually
every car built. Additionally, the car had a smallish cubic capacity due to
its 8 ft 7 in IH. The Pennsy kept it in production so long that it was
obsolescent by the time the last one was built in 1932. But the Pennsy
built 28,701 of them, and they showed up in every kind of freight and
passenger (as express cars) all over North America from 1924 into the 1960s.
You simply can't model a steam era freight train without at least one.

Runner-up - NYC USRA-design steel boxcar: Just as numerous as the X29 when
you add up all of them system wide, but sorely underrepresented on almost
every steam-era layout. Another car you just got to have to model a steam
era freight train.


Ben Hom


Re: Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's

ljack70117@...
 

I think someone is mixed up that wood elevators with a metal or asbestos covering on the out side made them fire proof. Also concrete elevators were also more fire proof. This is not true. The danger of fire came NOT from the outside but from the inside. There were temperature probes put in each bin at about 10 to 15 foot intervals to keep tract of the temperature in each bin if the wheat got to hot it would erupt in flames. When the temperature reached a certain point they would move it to another bin. The moving cools it off. That is why an elevator never filled all of it's bins at least one would be empty and depending the size of the elevator may many more. You have never seen a concrete elevator on fire???? I have.
The metal coverings put on wood elevators was to protect it from the wood rotting from the weather.
Thank you
Larry Jackman

On Tuesday, May 20, 2003, at 08:21 PM, John Boren wrote:


When did concrete grain elevators begin to replace
the old wooden elevators? Did the two co-exist for
any length of time? I'm thinking concrete elevators
would have shown up about when covered hoppers began
being used to haul grain, but that's just speculation
on my part.In the 1950's would one tend to see more
wooden elevators in the southwest than the concrete
variety? Thanks for the input.

Shawn Beckert
Shawn,

Concrete elevators date back to about 1915 when they became the standard for
building new elevators. Generally the wood ones weren't torn down, however,
so concrete and wood types coexisted for decades. In fact, there are still
quite a few wood elevators left. I see them all the time in small towns in
Kansas still today.

Wood elevators were typically 65-75 feet tall, while concrete elevators were
85-115 feet tall. (The very large elevator complexes with dozens of bins
were up to 130' tall.) So as the need for capacity increased (higher crop
yields plus trucks allowed grain to be hauled farther to larger elevators)
there was a change to concrete because they had outgrown the practical
limits of wood elevator bins. A book I read (Grain Elevators by Lisa
Mahar-Keplinger IIRC) also stated that the factors favoring the changeover
were concrete ones were cheaper, easier to build, and fireproof, and lower
maintenance.

Most of the surviving wood elevators were sided after construction with
asbestos or metal, principally to reduce fires. The book stated that wood
elevators without steel or asbestos siding burned on the average every four
years!!

I would guess that there were actually fewer wood elevators in the southwest
for two reasons. First, crop farming developed later in the southwest than
in other parts of the country, so more of their elevators would have been
built before 1915. Also, wood was more scarce (and therefore more
expensive) in most parts of the southwest US in the late 1800s and early
1900s.

I have more info, but since this is a freight car list, contact me directly
if you're interested.

Jack Boren


Re: Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's

ljack70117@...
 

The UNPAC had three sizes of hoppers used for grain 1970 Cf, 1792Cf and 2502 Cf. Used in the 1940s for grain. They were HK50-4, HK50-5 and HK70-1 hoppers that hat covers put on them for grain service.
Thank you
Larry Jackman

On Tuesday, May 20, 2003, at 07:57 PM, tim gilbert wrote:

ljack70117@... wrote:

UPRR had covered hoppers in the 1940s.
But UP #1-500 were 1,958 cubic feet, 70 tons nominal capacity cars which
suggest that they were intended to carry much denser commodities than
grain.

Grain Hoppers generally were rated at around 3,000 foot cubic capacity
for 70 tons nominal capacities. The UP had none of these listed in the
April 1949 ORER. I am aware of no such animal existing on other roads in
1949, but my survey is rather brief.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Accurail Hoppers

Richard Hendrickson
 

Hi,
A couple of question for you gentelmen. First, is the Accurail 55
ton USRA hopper a reasonably accurate? Second, was it used on the ATSF
in the 40's?
Yes (if you don't object to cast-on details) but no, the Santa Fe never
owned USRA hoppers - and, in the era to which this list is devoted, hardly
any cross hoppers of any description. Bulk mineral loads were handled
primarily in the Santa Fe's large fleet of Caswell and post-Caswell GS
gondolas.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: Grainloading Facilities in the 1950's

Shawn Beckert
 

UPRR had covered hoppers in the 1940's
But UP #1-500 were 1958 cubic feet, 70 tons nominal capacity
cars which suggest they were intended to carry much denser
commodities than grain.
Grain hoppers generally were rated at around 3000 cubic foot
capacity for 70 tons nominal capacities. The UP had none of
these listed in the April 1949 ORER. I am aware of no such
animal existing on other roads in 1949, but my survey is rather
brief.
It's my understanding that the 70-ton cars were used primarily for
cement or sand loading. The GATX Airslide cars came along in the
late 1950's, as I recall, and I'm not sure that they were used for
grain so much as processed flour and the like. The "grain hopper"
didn't come into its own until the PS-2's of the 1960's, AFAIK.

The point of my original question was to gain an understanding of
how boxcars in grain service were loaded in the 1950's. We know
grain was bagged and loaded into cars, we know that cars with grain
doors were loaded by chute. But did wooden grain elevators load both
ways? And did concrete elevators load by chute only, or did some have
the capability to fill "by the bag" and load a boxcar the old fashioned
way? It's not an idle question; such information would be helpful in
modeling an elevator located in the southwest of the 1950's. I haven't
been able to locate any photos of grain elevators in the region/period
I'm modeling to help in resolving this issue.

Shawn Beckert

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