Date   

Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Tim O'Connor
 


At the very bottom of the dam along the river was a broad concrete platform and just inside were the gigantic
generators and other machinery and I vaguely recall from my 1961 visit as a child that there was rail embedded
in the concrete. So yeah there were probably many such moves from the top to the bottom.

Tim O'Connor


On 6/11/2022 3:52 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:

Another possibility is that they may have short section(s) of temporary track at the bottom, and it might be useful to be able to easily move the the car and it’s contents to various locations. That’s not particularly unusual. They sometimes swung and lowered small locomotives into similar sites for moving such cars about.

Dan Mitchell


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: MOW cars, was Accurail MKT 36’ boxcar

Tim O'Connor
 


I'm fairly sure the B-50-10's were not 10-6 IH box cars.


On 6/11/2022 1:29 PM, Ken Adams wrote:

Tim, 

The foobie part is that the boxcar basis should have been a 10'6" IH car. I modified some of the dimensions of the area around the door to compensate. The picture you included was the primary source material originally from Jason Hill's blog. The picture is dated after the SP changed the MOW scheme to light grey. 

There is a new SPH&TS book in the works on SP MOW equipment but it has not yet been published. The previous book on the subject is now out of print and has become a highly priced collectors item. 
--
Ken Adams

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: ADMIN: STMFC Groups.io Fees

 

Well worth a few bucks. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Jun 11, 2022, at 8:55 PM, Aley, Jeff A <jaley@...> wrote:



Hi Folks,

 

               On June 3, 2022, I paid the $220.00 annual renewal to Groups.io for RealSTMFC.  Our group is a “Premium” group (as defined by Groups.io), which means that we have plenty of storage, so our emails and attachments don’t get lost / deleted.

 

               I paid last year’s fees ($220.00) out of pocket, and if I remember correctly, the fees for 2020 were paid by a member who wishes to remain anonymous.

 

               There are ways for me to solicit money from the membership using a Groups.io feature, but that requires me to give Groups.io a bunch of my bank account information – no thanks.  I do, however, have a PayPal account.  So, if anyone wishes to donate a few bucks, he can send it to me on PayPal using my email address, which is jaley at comcast dot net.

 

Thanks, and back to Freight Cars!

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, RealSTMFC

 


ADMIN: STMFC Groups.io Fees

Aley, Jeff A
 

Hi Folks,

 

               On June 3, 2022, I paid the $220.00 annual renewal to Groups.io for RealSTMFC.  Our group is a “Premium” group (as defined by Groups.io), which means that we have plenty of storage, so our emails and attachments don’t get lost / deleted.

 

               I paid last year’s fees ($220.00) out of pocket, and if I remember correctly, the fees for 2020 were paid by a member who wishes to remain anonymous.

 

               There are ways for me to solicit money from the membership using a Groups.io feature, but that requires me to give Groups.io a bunch of my bank account information – no thanks.  I do, however, have a PayPal account.  So, if anyone wishes to donate a few bucks, he can send it to me on PayPal using my email address, which is jaley at comcast dot net.

 

Thanks, and back to Freight Cars!

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, RealSTMFC

 


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

 

You’re a little backwards. Alfred Nobel invented dynamite. The invention made his rich. However, he was troubled that he had made his fortune on the misery of others (dynamite, other explosives, and weapons made by his company made war more deadly) He was called out as a war profiteer.

 

So he founded the Nobel Prizes.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, June 11, 2022 at 6:56 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

 

I am certain the car was secured to that platform.
Brakes set and wheels chocked to prevent any movement by the car.
Possibly chains were used as well to prevent any movement of that car on the platform.
Also, lifting was done with cables at each corner, to maintain a level lift no lateral dipping or sideway rocking of the platform and its load.

Anyway, dynamite does not explode if its dropped or smashed but care should be exercised in handling it anyway.
No smoking around it and keep any lit matches away from it as well!
Dynamite's development earned a Nobel Prize for creating a safer to handle explosive for mining and tunnel construction. 

Ed Bommer


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

It wasn’t all that unusual. Railroad cars and smaller locomotives were occasionally moved by overhead tramways of various designs and sizes. It was everyday standard practice in a few places, such as the Michigan-California lumber operation across the American River in California. Complete loaded lumber flatcars were routinely moved across a huge gorge

Dan Mitchell
==========.

On Jun 11, 2022, at 5:29 PM, Alexander Schneider Jr <aschneiderjr@...> wrote:

Lowering a loaded car on wheels, balanced on a platform suspended in the middle,  seems very unstable. If the center of gravity is even slightly off the platform will tip and the car will tend to roll or slide further in that direction. 

Winds in the canyon, possibly in different directions at different heights, are another factor. 

The photo proves they did it, but it wasn't a safe way. Hope the lading wasn't dynamite. 



Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Edward
 
Edited

I am certain the car was secured to that platform.
Brakes set and wheels chocked to prevent any movement by the car.
Possibly chains were used as well to prevent any movement of that car on the platform.
Also, lifting was done with steel rods at each corner, to maintain a level lift no lateral dipping or sideway rocking of the platform and its load.

Anyway, dynamite does not explode if its dropped or smashed but care should be exercised in handling it anyway.
No smoking around it and keep any lit matches away from it as well!
Dynamite's development earned a Nobel Prize for creating a safer to handle explosive for mining and tunnel construction. 

Ed Bommer


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Alex Schneider
 

Lowering a loaded car on wheels, balanced on a platform suspended in the middle,  seems very unstable. If the center of gravity is even slightly off the platform will tip and the car will tend to roll or slide further in that direction. 

Winds in the canyon, possibly in different directions at different heights, are another factor. 

The photo proves they did it, but it wasn't a safe way. Hope the lading wasn't dynamite. 


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Jack Mullen
 

On Sat, Jun 11, 2022 at 12:52 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:
Another possibility is that they may have short section(s) of temporary track at the bottom, and it might be useful to be able to easily move the the car and it’s contents to various locations.
That may be the case. If you look at the second  photo in the OP, there's a rectangular recess below where the boxcar is hanging, that looks like the platform carrying the car would fit into it. There appear to be parallel lines leading from it which may indicate a track.
Whether or not the car is going to be moved further by rail, lowering a loaded car saves an intermediate step of unloading and reloading the contents. The great dam and bridge projects of that period were innovative in developing methods to increase production efficiency and Improve safety.
Great photos! - and many more on the site. Thanks.

Jack Mullen 


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Another possibility is that they may have short section(s) of temporary track at the bottom, and it might be useful to be able to easily move the the car and it’s contents to various locations. That’s not particularly unusual. They sometimes swung and lowered small locomotives into similar sites for moving such cars about.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jun 11, 2022, at 2:19 PM, Edward <edb8381@...> wrote:

Probably thought best to keep the contents of that box car intact if it could be placed closer to a work site where the load inside was needed.
That could help prevent things from getting lost, stolen, etc. if the lading had to be transferred from the boxcar to other methods of cartage to get to the worksite.
Think of it as a shopping bag.
It was after all, just a big box that happened to have railroad wheels under it.

Ed Bommer  


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Edward
 

Probably thought best to keep the contents of that box car intact if it could be placed closer to a work site where the load inside was needed.
That could help prevent things from getting lost, stolen, etc. if the lading had to be transferred from the boxcar to other methods of cartage to get to the worksite.
Think of it as a shopping bag.
It was after all, just a big box that happened to have railroad wheels under it.

Ed Bommer  


Re: Photo: Gondolas With Structures For Hoover Dam (Circa 1930-1935)

Randy Hees
 

It is unlikely for weight.  The Boulder City Branch was laid with relay 90lb, with 23 ties per 39' rail length (although they used 31' rails) so was equivelent to any UP main line at the time.  The grades were 1.1 to 1.2%.  The line was super elevated to allow 45mph.  There are photos of the smaller challangers in Boulder City.  We believe that the larger chalangers with centepied tenders would have had issues on the wye.

Randy Hees,
Retired Director, Nevada State Railroad Museum, Boulder City


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Todd Sullivan
 

Interesting photo, but why on earth would they do that?

Todd Sullivan


Re: CABOT (CABX) carbon black hopper decals

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

The decals have found a home!

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
Sent: Friday, June 10, 2022 8:10 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] CABOT (CABX) carbon black hopper decals
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Folks,

I have a set of HO Scale "Early" CABOT (CABX 107) carbon black hopper decals that I'm not going to use. I believe that they might have come with an early release Rail Shops model but they may have been aftermarket. There are no other markings on the set which is all white, 2" x 4.75". I tried to scan them but the white decals on light blue paper... yeah... no.

Free to a good home. Just send me (OFF LIST) your snail mail and I'll pop them in the US mail for you. If you can't figure out how to send a private response to an on-list message, my email is smithbf at auburn dot edu.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: MOW cars, was Accurail MKT 36’ boxcar

Ken Adams
 

Tim, 

The foobie part is that the boxcar basis should have been a 10'6" IH car. I modified some of the dimensions of the area around the door to compensate. The picture you included was the primary source material originally from Jason Hill's blog. The picture is dated after the SP changed the MOW scheme to light grey. 

This whole project for myself and one other modeler I know of doing similar bashes for the scale repair car was last years Bachman scale test car which was very close to the SP prototype.  My fellow modeler made white and black lettering decals for the scale repair and scale test cars.  The SP scale test car was black before 1956. 

There is a new SPH&TS book in the works on SP MOW equipment but it has not yet been published. The previous book on the subject is now out of print and has become a highly priced collectors item. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Photos from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

https://special.library.unlv.edu/ark:/62930/d1bz10

https://special.library.unlv.edu/ark:/62930/d1qj65

Photos can be enlarged.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: MOW cars, was Accurail MKT 36’ boxcar

Tim O'Connor
 


Well, it's only a 2.0 to 3.0 on the 10 point Foobie Scale. It could be worse! :-D

And even fine scale models often have goofy wood grooves. Properly depicting wood sheathing
(horizontal or vertical boards) remains a point of contention. :-\

Tim O'Connor


On 6/11/2022 12:05 PM, Ken Adams wrote:

Accurail is still the source of foobie MW cars:


SPMW was painted FCR prior to 1956.  Don't look too closely as the sides are a somewhat botched attempt to remove the deep weathered grooving. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: MOW cars, was Accurail MKT 36’ boxcar

Ken Adams
 

Accurail is still the source of foobie MW cars:


SPMW was painted FCR prior to 1956.  Don't look too closely as the sides are a somewhat botched attempt to remove the deep weathered grooving. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: MOW cars, was Accurail MKT 36’ boxcar

Ted Larson
 

In 60s I recall structures similar to trailer homes mounted on flat cars for MoW workers.  




--
Ted Larson
Trainweb.org/MHRR   ---   GN in 1965   ---   NASG.org 


Re: Photo: Gondolas With Structures For Hoover Dam (Circa 1930-1935)

Ted Larson
 

Used to see MANY utility pole loads set up that same way.  Idlers used to allow shipping poles longer than the flat of gon.  




--
Ted Larson
Trainweb.org/MHRR   ---   GN in 1965   ---   NASG.org 

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