Date   

Re: ADMIN: STMFC Groups.io Fees

Dave Nelson
 

Jeff, Paypal has a donation method that provides a url for setting up donations.  These are operated by Paypal as an annual donation – they’ll donate once every 12 months.  People who sign up to make a donation can cancel their subscription at any time.  This allows people who want to let the donaction run for an extended time to do so… and those who wish to make a one time donation to do that.

 

With the number of members here and the price  you need to cover I’ll guess a $5 would cover a substantial portion your expenses, perhaps all.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Aley, Jeff A
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 6:55 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] ADMIN: STMFC Groups.io Fees

 

Hi Folks,

 

               On June 3, 2022, I paid the $220.00 annual renewal to Groups.io for RealSTMFC.  Our group is a “Premium” group (as defined by Groups.io), which means that we have plenty of storage, so our emails and attachments don’t get lost / deleted.

 

               I paid last year’s fees ($220.00) out of pocket, and if I remember correctly, the fees for 2020 were paid by a member who wishes to remain anonymous.

 

               There are ways for me to solicit money from the membership using a Groups.io feature, but that requires me to give Groups.io a bunch of my bank account information – no thanks.  I do, however, have a PayPal account.  So, if anyone wishes to donate a few bucks, he can send it to me on PayPal using my email address, which is jaley at comcast dot net.

 

Thanks, and back to Freight Cars!

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, RealSTMFC

 


Re: Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Charlie Duckworth
 

Fenton
The roof ends and sides are all one piece so lots of saw work to get to the roof.  Just FYI..
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Nelson Moyer
 

Very nice, Charlie. The washes really bring out the board detail.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charlie Duckworth via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 12:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

 

I’ve been fighting an infection so lots of indoor time on my second prescription hopefully that kicks it soon as I’m not suppose to be in the sun.   Anyway decided to pass the time by finishing the second Branchline reefer kit that was recently given to me.  I scraped away the reweight date of 1937 and bumped it up to 1953 and changed load limit and tare weights slightly.  I wanted to experiment with the brown Vallejo wash and after a light coat of Dullcote mixed with Black and Tan over the carbody I watched the ‘how to’ video again and added some wash around some of the metal pieces.  Watching other videos on how to make your own washing there’s alcohol in the mixture and it seems to settle into the Dullcote pretty quickly so something to watch using it.   I scraped off the Dullcote on a few boards to break up the sides and aged the roof with gray, brown and black pencils.   

As I mentioned with the NWX kit I’d forgot how well these kits were designed. The ice hatch mechanism was very scale like.  Enough typing here’s the car.
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

O Fenton Wells
 

Nicely done Charlie, I didn't realize these cars had the wooden roof.  Cool to know for various kitbashing projects.
Fenton

On Sun, Jun 12, 2022 at 1:08 PM Charlie Duckworth via groups.io <Worth51=duck.com@groups.io> wrote:

I’ve been fighting an infection so lots of indoor time on my second prescription hopefully that kicks it soon as I’m not suppose to be in the sun.   Anyway decided to pass the time by finishing the second Branchline reefer kit that was recently given to me.  I scraped away the reweight date of 1937 and bumped it up to 1953 and changed load limit and tare weights slightly.  I wanted to experiment with the brown Vallejo wash and after a light coat of Dullcote mixed with Black and Tan over the carbody I watched the ‘how to’ video again and added some wash around some of the metal pieces.  Watching other videos on how to make your own washing there’s alcohol in the mixture and it seems to settle into the Dullcote pretty quickly so something to watch using it.   I scraped off the Dullcote on a few boards to break up the sides and aged the roof with gray, brown and black pencils.   

As I mentioned with the NWX kit I’d forgot how well these kits were designed. The ice hatch mechanism was very scale like.  Enough typing here’s the car.
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Charlie Duckworth
 

I’ve been fighting an infection so lots of indoor time on my second prescription hopefully that kicks it soon as I’m not suppose to be in the sun.   Anyway decided to pass the time by finishing the second Branchline reefer kit that was recently given to me.  I scraped away the reweight date of 1937 and bumped it up to 1953 and changed load limit and tare weights slightly.  I wanted to experiment with the brown Vallejo wash and after a light coat of Dullcote mixed with Black and Tan over the carbody I watched the ‘how to’ video again and added some wash around some of the metal pieces.  Watching other videos on how to make your own washing there’s alcohol in the mixture and it seems to settle into the Dullcote pretty quickly so something to watch using it.   I scraped off the Dullcote on a few boards to break up the sides and aged the roof with gray, brown and black pencils.   

As I mentioned with the NWX kit I’d forgot how well these kits were designed. The ice hatch mechanism was very scale like.  Enough typing here’s the car.
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

 

That’s a big “nope” for me!

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, June 12, 2022 at 11:23 AM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

 


One of the more unusual loads...

Also during much of the construction period the river bed at the dam was completely dry, so vehicles
and equipment could be located there.


On 6/11/2022 12:45 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Photos from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

https://special.library.unlv.edu/ark:/62930/d1bz10

https://special.library.unlv.edu/ark:/62930/d1qj65

Photos can be enlarged.

Bob Chaparro

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Tim O'Connor
 


One of the more unusual loads...

Also during much of the construction period the river bed at the dam was completely dry, so vehicles
and equipment could be located there.


On 6/11/2022 12:45 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Photos from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

https://special.library.unlv.edu/ark:/62930/d1bz10

https://special.library.unlv.edu/ark:/62930/d1qj65

Photos can be enlarged.

Bob Chaparro



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Randy Hees
 

The last use of the “Government” railroad connecting the UP at Boulder City to the top of the dam was 1961.  The line was removed in 1963.  The cable hoist is still in place and used to lower heavy equipment down to the power house.  That equipment now arrives via heavy haul truck.

 The last car delivered (and retrieved soon after) was a tank car of mineral oil to fill a transformer.

 

The dam has 17 vertical shaft turbines, each powering a generator, plus two Pelton wheels which are used to make “in-house” power.  At the time the dam was built there was not yet a need or a way to transport all the power the dam could produce, so not all generators were installed.  The final generator was installed in 1961.

 

The Government Railroad was 10 miles long, running from the Union Pacific “Transfer” yard at Boulder City, down grades of as much as 4% down to approximately the elevation of the top of the dam, then along the canyon wall via 5 tunnels to the top of the dam.  Equipment consisted of a 30 ton Davenport gas/mechanical (preserved at the Nevada State Railroad Museum, Boulder City) and a 80 ton whitcomb, built at the end of WWII for European service, having a close clearance cab.

 

The Six Companies construction railroad came off of the Government railroad between 1930 and 1933 or so… it was removed before the dam was completed as water started to be impounded.  It operated a significant fleet of ex Union Pacific 2-8-0s and 2-8-2’s as well as a former Tonopah & Tidewater 4-6-0, several shays and at least 4 Plymouth gasoline locomotives.

 The lower portion of the Government railroad is now a hiking trail… it passes through 5 tunnels, hence its name, the Tunnel Trail.

 

 Randy Hees

 

(retired) Director Nevada State Railroad Museum, Boulder City


Re: ADMIN: STMFC Groups.io Fees

Mike Settle
 

I'll send a contribution as soon as my cash deposit to Paypal clears.

Mike Settle


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Jim Betz
 

  ... and let's not forget that all of that overhead rigging was already in place and used to
      build the dam and it already crossed the RR tracks at one/both sides of the dam - so
      setting up to put a box car full of supplies down to the base of the dam was an easy
      deal for the crew.  We'll never know but I'm guessing that there was some heavy
      stuff in the car that would be used to equip the turbines/what ever.
  And this was not the only time that a box car was lowered into this dam ... I'm willing to
bet it wasn't an 'unusual' occurence and happened often enough that the shot was a
happy accident for the photographer.
                                                                                              - Jim in the PNW


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Tim O'Connor
 


At the very bottom of the dam along the river was a broad concrete platform and just inside were the gigantic
generators and other machinery and I vaguely recall from my 1961 visit as a child that there was rail embedded
in the concrete. So yeah there were probably many such moves from the top to the bottom.

Tim O'Connor


On 6/11/2022 3:52 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:

Another possibility is that they may have short section(s) of temporary track at the bottom, and it might be useful to be able to easily move the the car and it’s contents to various locations. That’s not particularly unusual. They sometimes swung and lowered small locomotives into similar sites for moving such cars about.

Dan Mitchell


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: MOW cars, was Accurail MKT 36’ boxcar

Tim O'Connor
 


I'm fairly sure the B-50-10's were not 10-6 IH box cars.


On 6/11/2022 1:29 PM, Ken Adams wrote:

Tim, 

The foobie part is that the boxcar basis should have been a 10'6" IH car. I modified some of the dimensions of the area around the door to compensate. The picture you included was the primary source material originally from Jason Hill's blog. The picture is dated after the SP changed the MOW scheme to light grey. 

There is a new SPH&TS book in the works on SP MOW equipment but it has not yet been published. The previous book on the subject is now out of print and has become a highly priced collectors item. 
--
Ken Adams

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: ADMIN: STMFC Groups.io Fees

 

Well worth a few bucks. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Jun 11, 2022, at 8:55 PM, Aley, Jeff A <jaley@...> wrote:



Hi Folks,

 

               On June 3, 2022, I paid the $220.00 annual renewal to Groups.io for RealSTMFC.  Our group is a “Premium” group (as defined by Groups.io), which means that we have plenty of storage, so our emails and attachments don’t get lost / deleted.

 

               I paid last year’s fees ($220.00) out of pocket, and if I remember correctly, the fees for 2020 were paid by a member who wishes to remain anonymous.

 

               There are ways for me to solicit money from the membership using a Groups.io feature, but that requires me to give Groups.io a bunch of my bank account information – no thanks.  I do, however, have a PayPal account.  So, if anyone wishes to donate a few bucks, he can send it to me on PayPal using my email address, which is jaley at comcast dot net.

 

Thanks, and back to Freight Cars!

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, RealSTMFC

 


ADMIN: STMFC Groups.io Fees

Aley, Jeff A
 

Hi Folks,

 

               On June 3, 2022, I paid the $220.00 annual renewal to Groups.io for RealSTMFC.  Our group is a “Premium” group (as defined by Groups.io), which means that we have plenty of storage, so our emails and attachments don’t get lost / deleted.

 

               I paid last year’s fees ($220.00) out of pocket, and if I remember correctly, the fees for 2020 were paid by a member who wishes to remain anonymous.

 

               There are ways for me to solicit money from the membership using a Groups.io feature, but that requires me to give Groups.io a bunch of my bank account information – no thanks.  I do, however, have a PayPal account.  So, if anyone wishes to donate a few bucks, he can send it to me on PayPal using my email address, which is jaley at comcast dot net.

 

Thanks, and back to Freight Cars!

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, RealSTMFC

 


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

 

You’re a little backwards. Alfred Nobel invented dynamite. The invention made his rich. However, he was troubled that he had made his fortune on the misery of others (dynamite, other explosives, and weapons made by his company made war more deadly) He was called out as a war profiteer.

 

So he founded the Nobel Prizes.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Edward <edb8381@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, June 11, 2022 at 6:56 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

 

I am certain the car was secured to that platform.
Brakes set and wheels chocked to prevent any movement by the car.
Possibly chains were used as well to prevent any movement of that car on the platform.
Also, lifting was done with cables at each corner, to maintain a level lift no lateral dipping or sideway rocking of the platform and its load.

Anyway, dynamite does not explode if its dropped or smashed but care should be exercised in handling it anyway.
No smoking around it and keep any lit matches away from it as well!
Dynamite's development earned a Nobel Prize for creating a safer to handle explosive for mining and tunnel construction. 

Ed Bommer


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

It wasn’t all that unusual. Railroad cars and smaller locomotives were occasionally moved by overhead tramways of various designs and sizes. It was everyday standard practice in a few places, such as the Michigan-California lumber operation across the American River in California. Complete loaded lumber flatcars were routinely moved across a huge gorge

Dan Mitchell
==========.

On Jun 11, 2022, at 5:29 PM, Alexander Schneider Jr <aschneiderjr@...> wrote:

Lowering a loaded car on wheels, balanced on a platform suspended in the middle,  seems very unstable. If the center of gravity is even slightly off the platform will tip and the car will tend to roll or slide further in that direction. 

Winds in the canyon, possibly in different directions at different heights, are another factor. 

The photo proves they did it, but it wasn't a safe way. Hope the lading wasn't dynamite. 



Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Edward
 
Edited

I am certain the car was secured to that platform.
Brakes set and wheels chocked to prevent any movement by the car.
Possibly chains were used as well to prevent any movement of that car on the platform.
Also, lifting was done with steel rods at each corner, to maintain a level lift no lateral dipping or sideway rocking of the platform and its load.

Anyway, dynamite does not explode if its dropped or smashed but care should be exercised in handling it anyway.
No smoking around it and keep any lit matches away from it as well!
Dynamite's development earned a Nobel Prize for creating a safer to handle explosive for mining and tunnel construction. 

Ed Bommer


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Alex Schneider
 

Lowering a loaded car on wheels, balanced on a platform suspended in the middle,  seems very unstable. If the center of gravity is even slightly off the platform will tip and the car will tend to roll or slide further in that direction. 

Winds in the canyon, possibly in different directions at different heights, are another factor. 

The photo proves they did it, but it wasn't a safe way. Hope the lading wasn't dynamite. 


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Jack Mullen
 

On Sat, Jun 11, 2022 at 12:52 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:
Another possibility is that they may have short section(s) of temporary track at the bottom, and it might be useful to be able to easily move the the car and it’s contents to various locations.
That may be the case. If you look at the second  photo in the OP, there's a rectangular recess below where the boxcar is hanging, that looks like the platform carrying the car would fit into it. There appear to be parallel lines leading from it which may indicate a track.
Whether or not the car is going to be moved further by rail, lowering a loaded car saves an intermediate step of unloading and reloading the contents. The great dam and bridge projects of that period were innovative in developing methods to increase production efficiency and Improve safety.
Great photos! - and many more on the site. Thanks.

Jack Mullen 


Re: Photos: Boxcar Being Lowered At Hoover Dam (Circa 1931-1935)

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Another possibility is that they may have short section(s) of temporary track at the bottom, and it might be useful to be able to easily move the the car and it’s contents to various locations. That’s not particularly unusual. They sometimes swung and lowered small locomotives into similar sites for moving such cars about.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jun 11, 2022, at 2:19 PM, Edward <edb8381@...> wrote:

Probably thought best to keep the contents of that box car intact if it could be placed closer to a work site where the load inside was needed.
That could help prevent things from getting lost, stolen, etc. if the lading had to be transferred from the boxcar to other methods of cartage to get to the worksite.
Think of it as a shopping bag.
It was after all, just a big box that happened to have railroad wheels under it.

Ed Bommer  

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