Date   

Re: PFE Reefers Haulin’ Syrup (Undated)

Dave Parker
 

Andy, I don't understand the "small chance" qualifier:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Log_Cabin_syrup

BTW, this got me digging a bit.  Vermont Maid was the first blended breakfast syrup, and was founded in Burlington, VT in 1906.  In some significant part because of the rail connections there (Rutland and Central Vermont).  There's a cool YouTube video about Vermont Maid, ca. 3 minutes long.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: PFE Reefers Haulin’ Syrup (Undated)

 

Read the sign again. 

“100 carloads in four trains”

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Jun 13, 2022, at 2:16 PM, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:


There is a small chance that one of the pancake syrups carrioed in this p[icture's car may be one I discovered decades ago.

While a college student in California's Humboldt Bay region I worked with a friend doing construction work as it paid 3 times what the available minimum wage offering jobs had.

An older home, which I believe was built in the 1920s, was a job we had taken on to refresh the pantry and side entrance area. We stripped the inside lath walls and made the discovery of a few silver dollar coins, a few empty vegetable cans and an M. J Brandenstein Coffee can with a hand written letter from a Sherrif from the next county north with grimn notes of pour health of a relative. The coins we gave to the house's owner who gladly offered the remaining relics to me, which besides the aforementioned cans was a steel tin can of Log Cabin Syrup (You were all probably wondering where I was going with this!). This can was in the shape of a cabin and the lithographed paint was in good shape. Seeing that this was in California, and around the time this picture was taken I like to think that my can made the trip to California with the other 1000s of cans carried in the 4 box cars.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Monday, June 13, 2022 at 12:00:48 PM PDT, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


PFE Reefers Haulin’ Syrup (Undated)

Photo courtesy of Jeff Stein.

He comments:

“The banner reads: “WORLD’S GREATEST SHIPMENT...”

“One Hundred Carloads in Four Special Trains”...heading to Sacramento.

H.C. Tibbetts, photographer.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup

PFE__Syrup__Jeff_Stein_Collection.jpg

PFE__Syrup__Jeff_Stein_Collection.jpg


PFE Reefers Haulin’ Syrup (Undated)

Andy Carlson
 

There is a small chance that one of the pancake syrups carrioed in this p[icture's car may be one I discovered decades ago.

While a college student in California's Humboldt Bay region I worked with a friend doing construction work as it paid 3 times what the available minimum wage offering jobs had.

An older home, which I believe was built in the 1920s, was a job we had taken on to refresh the pantry and side entrance area. We stripped the inside lath walls and made the discovery of a few silver dollar coins, a few empty vegetable cans and an M. J Brandenstein Coffee can with a hand written letter from a Sherrif from the next county north with grimn notes of pour health of a relative. The coins we gave to the house's owner who gladly offered the remaining relics to me, which besides the aforementioned cans was a steel tin can of Log Cabin Syrup (You were all probably wondering where I was going with this!). This can was in the shape of a cabin and the lithographed paint was in good shape. Seeing that this was in California, and around the time this picture was taken I like to think that my can made the trip to California with the other 1000s of cans carried in the 4 box cars.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Monday, June 13, 2022 at 12:00:48 PM PDT, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


PFE Reefers Haulin’ Syrup (Undated)

Photo courtesy of Jeff Stein.

He comments:

“The banner reads: “WORLD’S GREATEST SHIPMENT...”

“One Hundred Carloads in Four Special Trains”...heading to Sacramento.

H.C. Tibbetts, photographer.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


PFE Reefers Haulin’ Syrup (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

PFE Reefers Haulin’ Syrup (Undated)

Photo courtesy of Jeff Stein.

He comments:

“The banner reads: “WORLD’S GREATEST SHIPMENT...”

“One Hundred Carloads in Four Special Trains”...heading to Sacramento.

H.C. Tibbetts, photographer.”

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Mon, Jun 13, 2022 at 08:36 AM, Todd Sullivan wrote:
That's interesting about the MILW arrivals.  Did the MILW have more mud in its ballast?
Todd, I'm just tweaking someone's tail, so to speak, but yes, the steam era MILW was ballasted with gravel. I shouldn't be so smug... so was the Soo. In fact, during our era of interest a lot of RR mileage was ballasted with gravel, often "bank run" gravel which included a lot of clay and sand. So to my mind the dominant weathering color for underbodies should have a sandy tanish tone.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Baggage Car As An Airplane Parts Carrier

Ian Cranstone
 

Looks like a wood baggage car to me, and I see the word ERIE under the left hand baggage door. I suspect the number is behind whatever is hanging over the side. Too bad this photo predates colour photography, as I suspect some powerful colours were used!

Ian Cranstone

Osgoode, Ontario, Canada

lamontc@...

http://freightcars.nakina.net


On Jun 13, 2022, at 10:55 AM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi Bob and List members,

Thanks Bob for the great image. Certainly there are a number of questions raised here...

(1) Is this a wood construction car? Steel baggage cars would have been few and far between in 1911...

(2) Whose car might it have been? I'm assuming this is a repurposed car from a 'normal' railroad, as opposed to a purpose-built car. I see no road name nor reporting marks. Hmmm, now that I think about it, maybe this is simply a retouched photo and the car did not look this way in real life?

(3) Bob mentioned "an offer of $50,000 to the first person who could fly a plane from New York to Los Angeles in under 30 consecutive days". I'm guessing it might have been faster to take the train to Los Angeles! I submit the fact that the baggage car was able to keep up with the airplane as evidence of this



Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Todd Sullivan
 

Dennis,

That's interesting about the MILW arrivals.  Did the MILW have more mud in its ballast?

Todd Sullivan


Northern Refrigerator Line NRC 17080

Lester Breuer
 

I have built Red Caboose Northern Refrigerator Line NRC 17080 built in Despatch Shops Incorporated (DSI) in 1941.   Merchants Despatch owned shops.  If you are interested in the build of this reefer with resin 4/5 dreadnaught ends cast in the M&N Shops rather than wood ends in kit and upgrade.  Photos and writeup of the build process including painting, lettering and weathering are now available on my blog I have to share photos and writeup of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following link:

 

http://mnrailroadcab100.blogspot.com/

 

Lester Breuer

 


Re: Baggage Car As An Airplane Parts Carrier

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Bob and List members,

Thanks Bob for the great image. Certainly there are a number of questions raised here...

(1) Is this a wood construction car? Steel baggage cars would have been few and far between in 1911...

(2) Whose car might it have been? I'm assuming this is a repurposed car from a 'normal' railroad, as opposed to a purpose-built car. I see no road name nor reporting marks. Hmmm, now that I think about it, maybe this is simply a retouched photo and the car did not look this way in real life?

(3) Bob mentioned "an offer of $50,000 to the first person who could fly a plane from New York to Los Angeles in under 30 consecutive days". I'm guessing it might have been faster to take the train to Los Angeles! I submit the fact that the baggage car was able to keep up with the airplane as evidence of this


Enjoy!


Claus Schlund





On 13-Jun-22 02:19, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Baggage Car As An Airplane Parts Carrier

This is a photo of a baggage car converted into an airplane parts carrier and rolling promotional billboard.

It was employed in 1911 by Armour & Company to support an airplane entered in a coast-to-coast contest in which the plane and the baggage car promoted Vin Fiz, a grape-flavored drink. This was one of several drinks marketed by Armour.

Newspaper publisher William Randolph Hurst made an offer of $50,000 to the first person who could fly a plane from New York to Los Angeles in under 30 consecutive days. Calbraith "Cal" Perry Rogers took up the challenge, sponsored by Armour.

To keep the plane running, Armour outfitted the baggage car, emblazoned with Vin Fitz advertising and loaded with airplane parts. It took Rogers 56 days to cross the country.  He crashed so often that there were very few original parts left on the plane when he finally made it to Los Angeles. Even so, he and the flying collection of plane parts were the first to cross the United States from coast to coast.

And Vin Fiz? It never really took off. Apparently, people didn’t like the taste.

The plane hangs in the Smithsonian.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Rich Gibson
 

I take some shade of black (oily, weathered, pure, etc.) and add a drop or two of some tan/brown. Every small batch I mix is slightly different and enough for a few cars, so that there is no constant color. I brush paint the wheel faces and side frames while they are on the car. Later, when I weather the car body with Pan Pastels, I brush the trucks with whatever color pigment I’m using for the splatter coming from below, usually Raw Umber, so that everything blends together. 


Spring 2022 Keystone Modeler

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,


The Spring 2022 issue of The Keystone Modeler, our 120th issue, is now ready for download from our web site at https://www.prrths.org/content.aspx?page_id=22...

The Keystone Modeler is a free E-zine produced quarterly by the Pennsylvania Railroad Technical and Historical Society.

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Sun, Jun 12, 2022 at 02:22 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
What is everyone's favorite wheel color?
Answering my own question, I liker Floquil Grimy Black with a touch of Floquil Earth mixed in to warm it up... More earth if the car had just arrived via the Milwaukee Road :-)

Dennis Storzek


Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Eric Hansmann
 

I use Polly Scale Railroad Tie as the base color. Eventually, this bottle will be empty and I’ll need to find a replacement color. 

After the paint dries, I swirl PanPastel neutral grey extra dark on the outer wheel face. I posted details on my blog a couple months ago. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On Jun 12, 2022, at 9:06 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

I do most of my weathering with acrylic paints, ustabe Polyscale, now craft acrylics (not my favorite paint, but cheap and available).  For solid bearing trucks' wheel faces, I start out with black, and add a bit of BCR and a tiny touch of orange for the faces.   My goal is a not-quite-black look that has a brownish tone for the outer faces.  The inner wheel faces and axles get a more orange tone that is lighter, based on various field observations and photos.  I try to harmonize that color with the color of the underbody, since I figure they would all be getting the same coating of guck.

I agree that rusty wheel faces are a modern thing, and when I see them on a model freight car from the steam era, I know the modeler isn't looking carefully at photos of the prototype.  That's not meant to be a jab at anyone, it's just that I learned along time ago, on the advice of modelers who were more accomplished than I, that consulting photos is really important.

Todd Sullivan


Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

David
 

I have to wonder: would the full 1930s-era lettering package have still been around in 1953, or would the car have been repainted in a simplified scheme by then?

David Thompson


Baggage Car As An Airplane Parts Carrier

Bob Chaparro
 

Baggage Car As An Airplane Parts Carrier

This is a photo of a baggage car converted into an airplane parts carrier and rolling promotional billboard.

It was employed in 1911 by Armour & Company to support an airplane entered in a coast-to-coast contest in which the plane and the baggage car promoted Vin Fiz, a grape-flavored drink. This was one of several drinks marketed by Armour.

Newspaper publisher William Randolph Hurst made an offer of $50,000 to the first person who could fly a plane from New York to Los Angeles in under 30 consecutive days. Calbraith "Cal" Perry Rogers took up the challenge, sponsored by Armour.

To keep the plane running, Armour outfitted the baggage car, emblazoned with Vin Fitz advertising and loaded with airplane parts. It took Rogers 56 days to cross the country.  He crashed so often that there were very few original parts left on the plane when he finally made it to Los Angeles. Even so, he and the flying collection of plane parts were the first to cross the United States from coast to coast.

And Vin Fiz? It never really took off. Apparently, people didn’t like the taste.

The plane hangs in the Smithsonian.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Robert kirkham
 

looks great - I enjoy how the weathering on the roof and siding brings the car to life.

Rob


On Jun 12, 2022, at 10:08 AM, Charlie Duckworth via groups.io <Worth51@...> wrote:

I’ve been fighting an infection so lots of indoor time on my second prescription hopefully that kicks it soon as I’m not suppose to be in the sun.   Anyway decided to pass the time by finishing the second Branchline reefer kit that was recently given to me.  I scraped away the reweight date of 1937 and bumped it up to 1953 and changed load limit and tare weights slightly.  I wanted to experiment with the brown Vallejo wash and after a light coat of Dullcote mixed with Black and Tan over the carbody I watched the ‘how to’ video again and added some wash around some of the metal pieces.  Watching other videos on how to make your own washing there’s alcohol in the mixture and it seems to settle into the Dullcote pretty quickly so something to watch using it.   I scraped off the Dullcote on a few boards to break up the sides and aged the roof with gray, brown and black pencils.   

As I mentioned with the NWX kit I’d forgot how well these kits were designed. The ice hatch mechanism was very scale like.  Enough typing here’s the car.<9C0E5213-BBEE-4900-8540-8FB41FD256FC.jpeg><E669C594-17A3-4980-B727-6EA5469F3C7B.jpeg><CCE6D4B8-2C81-4FEA-96A9-8538119B2D3A.jpeg><F4180348-2F8F-4F4A-9BCF-FA30C0D73FB5.jpeg>
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.



Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Todd Sullivan
 

I do most of my weathering with acrylic paints, ustabe Polyscale, now craft acrylics (not my favorite paint, but cheap and available).  For solid bearing trucks' wheel faces, I start out with black, and add a bit of BCR and a tiny touch of orange for the faces.   My goal is a not-quite-black look that has a brownish tone for the outer faces.  The inner wheel faces and axles get a more orange tone that is lighter, based on various field observations and photos.  I try to harmonize that color with the color of the underbody, since I figure they would all be getting the same coating of guck.

I agree that rusty wheel faces are a modern thing, and when I see them on a model freight car from the steam era, I know the modeler isn't looking carefully at photos of the prototype.  That's not meant to be a jab at anyone, it's just that I learned along time ago, on the advice of modelers who were more accomplished than I, that consulting photos is really important.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Tony Thompson
 

Nowadays I prefer Tamiya “German Grey” for wheel faces.

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Charlie Duckworth
 

I mix my black dry pigments with paint thinner and a little brown and paint the outside of the wheels; it drys black pretty quickly.  

On Sun, Jun 12, 2022 at 7:26 PM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer_at_hotmail.com_Worth51@...> wrote:
I started out painting wheel faces a dark rusty color mixed from Floquil Rust and Roof Brown. The backs of the wheels were painted the same as the faces. Then I scrubbed powdered black chalk onto the

I started out painting wheel faces a dark rusty color mixed from Floquil Rust and Roof Brown. The backs of the wheels were painted the same as the faces. Then I scrubbed powdered black chalk onto the wheel faces to blacken them. Chalk scrubbing is a dirty business, so I always did wheels separately before putting them into the side frames. After Floquil went away, I switched to Model Master Skin Tone Dark Tint as the base color for the front face, and Model Master Dark Tan for the rest. I used black Pan Pastel for the finish when I weathered the car. I have enough Model Master to last a lifetime, since my roster is nearly complete.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 4:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

 

Really nice weathering, Charlie, as on all your cars. But, we need to have a discussion about weathering wheels. Rusty wheel plates is a modern, post roller bearing thing. Solid bearings used a 'total loss' lube system, where after the oil was drawn up between the axle and bearing, a portion migrated out the back of the journal box (there was no oil seal) where ti was flung out on the face of the wheel. Of course, anything oily in a dusty environment quickly builds a coating of oily grunge. Those cast iron wheels might have started out rusty, but they didn't stay that way long.

What is everyone's favorite wheel color?

Dennis Storzek

 


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

Nelson Moyer
 

I started out painting wheel faces a dark rusty color mixed from Floquil Rust and Roof Brown. The backs of the wheels were painted the same as the faces. Then I scrubbed powdered black chalk onto the wheel faces to blacken them. Chalk scrubbing is a dirty business, so I always did wheels separately before putting them into the side frames. After Floquil went away, I switched to Model Master Skin Tone Dark Tint as the base color for the front face, and Model Master Dark Tan for the rest. I used black Pan Pastel for the finish when I weathered the car. I have enough Model Master to last a lifetime, since my roster is nearly complete.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 4:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Rusty wheels [was] Branchline UTLX Wood Reefer

 

Really nice weathering, Charlie, as on all your cars. But, we need to have a discussion about weathering wheels. Rusty wheel plates is a modern, post roller bearing thing. Solid bearings used a 'total loss' lube system, where after the oil was drawn up between the axle and bearing, a portion migrated out the back of the journal box (there was no oil seal) where ti was flung out on the face of the wheel. Of course, anything oily in a dusty environment quickly builds a coating of oily grunge. Those cast iron wheels might have started out rusty, but they didn't stay that way long.

What is everyone's favorite wheel color?

Dennis Storzek

 

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