Date   

Re: Wood grain doors

Jared Harper
 

Wow!  Thanks.  I should have known that you are the go to person for odd requests.  Based on your photos I am going to have to make a lot more.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: Wood grain doors

Jared Harper
 

Thanks.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery (1949)

Dave Parker
 

In the main, I agree with Ken, as long as "any" is broadly defined.  I've attached a 1921 list of refineries from the trade journal Oildom, as it might provide some insights about refinery locations -- at least for pre-WWII modelers.

When I first started digging into this topic several years ago, I was surprised to learn that New England actually had a half dozen or so refineries -- two in Providence, the remainder in Mass.  They were all located so as to receive crude by boat, as there no pipelines in New England.  They are long gone now, but I have never tried to track down their dates of closure, except that I know that the Fall River facility was converted to a terminal  by Shell in 1929.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


New member checking in

Jim Pattison
 

Hi,

I model the SP but am interested in having at least semi realistic models of other road’s cars in my trains which led me here.  I hope that I can pick the collective brains about models that are available of freight cars from before 1957. 

I do have a few books on SP freight cars so might be able to help if someone is looking  for info about them.

 

Jim Pattison

Modeling part of the SP coast line circa 1957

In Mossyrock, WA


Re: Wood grain doors

Robert kirkham
 

not sure about New England, but in Vancouver BC (which is a long ways from the grain belt) there were dedicated storage buildings for grain doors from sometime in the 1920s until boxcars ceased to be used.  If grain was moving to a flour mill, or export terminal, or anything else, i imagine you’d find them.

Rob   

On Jun 20, 2022, at 6:45 AM, Rich Gibson via groups.io <richgibson89@...> wrote:

Hi all, I feel a bit hesitant to ask this, but as a non-granger road modeler, I hope that I will be forgiven…
Over what distance range were grain doors used? Were they used primarily in ‘local’ transport of bulk grain from elevators to mills or could they be found far afield from the bulk grain origin point? As an early 1950’s New England modeler, I’m wondering if a car with grain doors would ever show up in that part of the world. 
Thanks for tolerating what might be a stupid question. 

Rich Gibson
Golden, CO



Re: NP, MILW & M&StL ??? c.1939

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Sun, Jun 19, 2022 at 05:36 PM, Robert kirkham wrote:
Looking at the photo a little more closely, i’m thinking the car with the Murphy 5/5/5 end is lettered M&StL.  It has an illegible 5 digit number, so - guessing here - i’m assuming it is a USRA (or clone) double sheathed car in the 25000-25898 series (2 remaining in the Jan 1953 ORER).  As you note, that makes it 9’ IH. 
It is definitely a USRA DS car, you can tell by the shape of the poling pocket castings, also the castings that anchor diagonal tie rods one third of the way up the ends, which the SS cars lack. As to being a clone, all the clones I'm familiar with were built with 7/8 ends and a lower IH.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Wood grain doors

Nelson Moyer
 

Unless a car is being loaded or unloaded, you will  never see grain doors because the car doors are closed and sealed while the car is in transit. I see trains with open box car doors,  grain doors and loads on model railroads, but that’s not prototypical. It’s OK to have a car with open doors spotted by an elevator for loading or unloading, but not OK on moving cars except when an elevator car puller is in operation.

 

Grain doors were stenciled for return to the railroad owning them. I guess it’s OK to have a small stack of grain doors next to an elevator, feed mill, or freight house waiting to be returned.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rich Gibson via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2022 8:45 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Wood grain doors

 

Hi all, I feel a bit hesitant to ask this, but as a non-granger road modeler, I hope that I will be forgiven…
Over what distance range were grain doors used? Were they used primarily in ‘local’ transport of bulk grain from elevators to mills or could they be found far afield from the bulk grain origin point? As an early 1950’s New England modeler, I’m wondering if a car with grain doors would ever show up in that part of the world. 
Thanks for tolerating what might be a stupid question. 

Rich Gibson

 


Re: Wood grain doors

Rich Gibson
 

Hi all, I feel a bit hesitant to ask this, but as a non-granger road modeler, I hope that I will be forgiven…
Over what distance range were grain doors used? Were they used primarily in ‘local’ transport of bulk grain from elevators to mills or could they be found far afield from the bulk grain origin point? As an early 1950’s New England modeler, I’m wondering if a car with grain doors would ever show up in that part of the world. 
Thanks for tolerating what might be a stupid question. 

Rich Gibson
Golden, CO


Re: NP, MILW & M&StL ??? c.1939

Hudson Leighton
 

NP 49210 was dismantled 4-12-1944.

-Hudson


Re: NP, MILW & M&StL ??? c.1939

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for the comments Jack.  I should have looked these up in the ORER before writing. . . .  Years ago, i knew so little about some of these railroads.  For example, i used to think M&StL stood for Montreal & Saint Lawrence, lol.  Still gives me a smile every time I see the initials and mentally correct myself.  Thankfully the ORER and modellers on this list helped put that error behind me!  But i’m still piecing together the steam era fleets of many railroads.  

Looking at the photo a little more closely, i’m thinking the car with the Murphy 5/5/5 end is lettered M&StL.  It has an illegible 5 digit number, so - guessing here - i’m assuming it is a USRA (or clone) double sheathed car in the 25000-25898 series (2 remaining in the Jan 1953 ORER).  As you note, that makes it 9’ IH. 

The MILW car is (I think) numbered 716715, so a part of the 716500-717199 series of composite cars with IH of 9’ 3”.  I don’t think i’ve seen a model for these available anywhere.

NP 49210 appears to no longer be listed in 1953 ORER.   

On the other hand, NP 11558 falls within the large series of steel underframe cars that (I think) were modelled by Rapido.  


Rob 
  

  

On Jun 19, 2022, at 4:28 PM, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:

On Sun, Jun 19, 2022 at 10:05 AM, Robert kirkham wrote:
I’m wondering whether that is a MILW car to the right, with the reporting mark somewhat obscured on the 5/5/5 murphy corrugations.
Well, MILW had a large fleet of USRA SS boxcars, so a good possibility. But while it's probably a mug's game to try to interpret the visible fragments of lettering on the rib, the pattern of what pieces seem to be vertical and what seem to be diagonal or curved strokes doesn't say MILW to me. Neither do I see a good fit to any other owner's marks.
 I’m not a MILW Road student, so don’t have much of a grip on their rolling stock.  My thinking is that the car at right is a USRA car, but i’m wondering why the MILW car to the left (with dreadnaught ends) looks taller.

Because it IS taller. The 4/5 Dreadnaught commonly appears on boxcars with around 10' IH.

Jack Mullen




Re: Suppler milk reefer model

steve_wintner
 

Thanks Bruce! Much appreciated. 


Re: NP, MILW & ??? c.1939

Jack Mullen
 

On Sun, Jun 19, 2022 at 10:05 AM, Robert kirkham wrote:
I’m wondering whether that is a MILW car to the right, with the reporting mark somewhat obscured on the 5/5/5 murphy corrugations.
Well, MILW had a large fleet of USRA SS boxcars, so a good possibility. But while it's probably a mug's game to try to interpret the visible fragments of lettering on the rib, the pattern of what pieces seem to be vertical and what seem to be diagonal or curved strokes doesn't say MILW to me. Neither do I see a good fit to any other owner's marks.
 I’m not a MILW Road student, so don’t have much of a grip on their rolling stock.  My thinking is that the car at right is a USRA car, but i’m wondering why the MILW car to the left (with dreadnaught ends) looks taller.

Because it IS taller. The 4/5 Dreadnaught commonly appears on boxcars with around 10' IH.

Jack Mullen



Re: Suppler milk reefer model

Bruce Smith
 

Steve,

I was purposefully vague because I did the original car modifications something like 10 years ago and I wasn't sure exactly what I had done.🧐 I took your request as motivation to look back and see.

I started with the Roundhouse (Athearn) 40' wood milk car. I believe that this car was significantly u[graded when released by Athearn, as the model was sold RTR, not as a kit, and had separate grab irons, ladders, and door latches. 

I disassembled the model by carefully removing the roof, and stripped the body and underbody. In the process, I broke the door latches, so I substituted some from Intermountain. I removed the lever hand brake and used a scratchbuilt housing and Kadee Equipco brake wheel along with Detail Associates 40 link/in chain for the brake chain. I added the brake step using Tichy supports and a resin step from the parts box. I also added a simple top-action uncoupling device to each end and swapped the couplers for Kadee #78. 

On the underbody, I removed the brake parts and substituted the CalScale set. I also used CalScale steam lines at both ends of the car, and added the CalScale fitting for air and signal lines on the other side of the coupler. At the very end of the build I added HiTech Details rubber air hoses for both the air and signal line (the latter not being 100% prototypic).

Paint was Poly Scale Pullman Green for the sides and roof walk and Model Master black for the roof, underbody, and trucks. The SUPPLEE MILK lettering was done off of the car and when finished, glued on with Same Stuff glue, which is very thin and wicks behind the letters quickly. 

I did the weathering as follows (allowing the paint to dry between each layer):
1) Top-coat of Vallejo flat “varnish”

2) Tamiya dark brown panel liner (enamel) on trucks, hinges, door gap, door header/footer, side sill, ladder fastenings, and any other detail that was in a different plane from the siding.

3) Dot filter along the top edge of the car sides and ends with artists’ oils, black, burnt umber, and burnt sienna. These were “pulled down” with a brush wetted with turpenol until almost all of the paint was removed.

4) Airbrush Vallejo German Grey lightly on roof and top of side and ends

5) Airbrush PolyScale RR tie brown lightly on underbody, trucks, side sills and lower part of body.

6) A final top-coat of Vallejo flat “varnish”


Regards,
Bruce

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of steve_wintner via groups.io <steve_wintner@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2022 1:05 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] Suppler milk reefer model
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Bruce, can you offer a little more on the details added ? Like Tim I'm very impressed and you've done a great job turning that older Roundhouse kit into something really nice. I'm thinking about a Soo milk car, I'm sure you've given the CV and Rutland fans ideas too ...

Steve


Re: Wood grain doors

Douglas Harding
 

Jared here are few photos. Usually they were stacked haphazardly near the tracks or the depot. The stack of doors on the FtDDM&S is an impressive pile. Don’t know the location, but would guess Fort Dodge, or perhaps Des Moines.

 

Doug Harding

https://www.facebook.com/douglas.harding.3156/

Youtube: Douglas Harding Iowa Central Railroad

 


Re: Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery (1949)

Ken Adams
 

Interesting also in that it appears to be such a small almost modellable refinery.  Jack's description of this type of 20th century industry is something we often overlook. This type of refinery could appear in any part of the country not just oil producing areas and has prototype small volumes of tank car traffic unlike the huge refineries. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


NP, MILW & ??? c.1939

Robert kirkham
 

Hi there - Guy Wilber pointed out a group of photos at the Library of Congress i hadn’t spent time with previously, and among them was this.
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017809692/   A very high definition version is available at the link.  

The two cars at the end of the tracks caught my attention.  I’m wondering whether that is a MILW car to the right, with the reporting mark somewhat obscured on the 5/5/5 murphy corrugations.  I’m not a MILW Road student, so don’t have much of a grip on their rolling stock.  My thinking is that the car at right is a USRA car, but i’m wondering why the MILW car to the left (with dreadnaught ends) looks taller.   The USRA cars weren’t short in the wood sheathed era . . .   

Not sure about the available models for the NP cars either.

By the way, what an excellent trash heap.  I suppose all the steel would have been collected and turned into landing craft by the time of my model era (1946).  
 
Rob


Re: Wood grain doors

Robert kirkham
 

that’s a great search Guy.   Lots of interesting images.   I really liked this one.  Fodder for a different kind of layout.
Rob

On Jun 19, 2022, at 6:33 AM, Guy Wilber via groups.io <guycwilber@...> wrote:

Jared,

Search “Grain Minnesota” within the Library of Congress collection.  I believe there are additional photos such as this.

Guy Wilber 
Reno, Nevada

<image0.jpeg>

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

On Jun 16, 2022, at 1:44 PM, Jared Harper <harperandbrown@...> wrote:


Anyone have pictures of wood grain doors in storage?

Thanks.

Jared Harper


Re: Wood grain doors

Guy Wilber
 

Jared,

Search “Grain Minnesota” within the Library of Congress collection.  I believe there are additional photos such as this.

Guy Wilber 
Reno, Nevada

image0.jpeg

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

On Jun 16, 2022, at 1:44 PM, Jared Harper <harperandbrown@...> wrote:


Anyone have pictures of wood grain doors in storage?

Thanks.

Jared Harper


Re: Fox Valley Models To Sell Their Tooling To Scale Trains

Andrew Jeanes
 

I've been hoping that Fox Valley would re-run their HO scale B&O M-53 boxcars at some point. ScaleTrains doesn't have a history of producing models from the steam era, so I'm not sure whether this sale bodes well or ill for more FVM M-53s in the future.

Andrew Jeanes
Kingston, ON


Re: Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery (1949)

Jack Mullen
 

I think the second car is also GPCX. The resolution is poor, and the reporting marks are obscured by the tank bands, but there seems to be a vertical stroke beginning the second letter, just left of the band. So not A, but maybe P.

General Petroleum was a California producer which had been acqy by Socony (Mobil). So why are a couple of their cars in Oklahoma, at what appears to be a small facility ? What's visible doesn't look like a 

Googling "Slayer Refining Co." worked better when I spelled "Salyer" correctly. ;^).  I found d that Salyer Oil was a local Oklahoma gasoline and oil company, and Salyer Refining Co. ran a used oil refining plant in Oklahoma City producing recycled lube oil. That's now a Superfund site. I think that's the photo location. I don't see any signs of the usual tank car loading platform and piping, but the bits of piping visible could well be for unloading. I conjecture that the plant receives waste oil by tank car, and likely distributes its product in drums and cans. 

Jack Mullen

3741 - 3760 of 197031